Harold Lloyd film trivia
Rae West's Anarcho-Generalist Visuo-Mental Artefact Internaut Surfers Sub-Site v. 30 September 2017 14:00

Compassion fatigue?   Bored with serious issues?   Oppressed by media idiocy?   Cast down by the infinite meanness of your fellow man?   Exasperated by Jewish lies? – Relax here with Rae West's General/ Trivia/ Visual Artefacts/ Errors Site for Internauts (the French expression).

Then go to the serious stuff here     big-lies.org     or   nukelies.org     or   Email



12 Days of Christmas     Little-Known Facts about Midwinter and Midsummer
Amen     Could this be the Egyptian word Amun...? And other amen-related issues
Beatle     George Harrison's Garden - Unique Picture! Years ago & Beatles & Bob Dylan!
Circumcision     Male circumcision: lost 1996 piece
COMPUTER WEBSITE HINTS - Learn simple HTML!
Diana     Proletarian tributes to Lady Diana Spencer
Drugs     Drugs: heroin, opium, cannabis...
Early Christianity: Was It Hi-Jacked by Jews? —And Did Jews Foist Islam onto Arabs?     'Yeshua' as a Jewish fictional character, injected into Greek and Latin Christianity | Identical standalone piece
Elvis     Presley theory: Welsh Saint, Biblical Name, Mountains, Stonehenge...
‘End Times’     ‘End Times’ as Mental Poison
Fairy Tales     A few remarks on Fairy Tales
'Flat Earth' Publicity - Why?     What motivations are behind the publicity of the 'flat earth'?
Fluoridation     Poisonous fluoride compounds in toothpaste and water
Gobëkli Tepe     Turkey's Turkey?   Is Gobëkli Tepe an Archaeological Fraud or Hoax?
Graffiti     Collected over about twenty years. All genuine graffiti! WARNING! Strong language
Greeks, Constellations, and Genetics     Greek Mnemonics? Stars and Human Genetics
Lawyers     Jokes about Lawyers - Punch joke, classical remarks, and links to other sites
Leys     Leys (or 'ley lines') and Alfred Watkins as a Pioneer
'Lunar Wave' and 'moon as back projection', 'flat earth'     'Lunar Waves' - Artefacts of Video Cameras
McDonalds Kroc     McLibel Trial of 1997 controversial leaflet (opens another window)
Monarchy     Mooning at the Monarchy, a Mayday 2000 protest souvenir, and more
Motorbike Design     Motorcycle Design and Norman Hossack: the Hard Path of the Inventor; a True Story
Muesli     What is the terrifying truth about muesli?? Find out here!!
'Orbs' and 'sun/moon nearer than clouds'     Yet more silly visual artefacts
Orion's Penis     - for Bauval, Gilbert, Hancock
Peter Merlin Cane     Graffiti in Paintings
Political Correctness     Understand and stamp out this phrase!
Puzzle Rings     Arabic or Egyptian Puzzle Ring: How to Solve
Razor Blades     Three Razor Blade Myths, starting 1950s, 1960s, 1970s
Reverse speech     aural artefacts from voice recordings
'Rods'     visual artefacts from video recorders (yes!)
'Ropeworms'     an 'artefact' in another sense
Salt in Diet and Campaigns to Reduce Consumption   Another covert demonisation policy
Shapeshifters & Reptilians     yet more video artefacts
Smoking     How dangerous is it? Little-known diet link!
Star Trek     based on Captain Cook's voyages?   Based on Khazaria?
Taj Mahal     Even the Taj Mahal has a 'conspiracy theory' ...
UFOs     Psychology. Human failings & why belief may be tacitly encouraged
UFO emails     sent to my earlier site in about 2000
World Tree     Tree as an Axis of Rotation?
Year 2000     Panic in 1999? Thirty-five years of dross
Yoghurt     The truth about yoghurt! At last!

HTML, contents © Rae West. First uploaded 98-04-09. This revision mostly 2001-01-06. Other material includes: Smoking 2013-01-21; Gobekli Tepe added 2013-02-07. Circumcision re-uploaded 2013-04-28 plus a few notes. Leys 2013-10-05; yoghurt 2013-10-20; salt and diet 2014-03-09; UFOs and Jews 2014-10-08. 'Lunar Waves' added 2014-12-01; 'Orbs' 2015-10-21. 'Ropeworms' 2016-07-19. Original Christianity Hijack idea 2016-08-17. Twelve days of Christmas 2017-01-18. Sun/moon nearer than clouds 2017-09-30
This is part of www.big-lies.org


Twelve Days of Christmas, Midwinter, and Midsummer

Little-known astronomical fact about day length changes...

... the winter solstice, that goes from, roughly, the 21st of December to the 6th of January, during which the earth changes its orientation to the sun. Life on earth [in the northern hemisphere!] experiences this as the return of light, sun and warmth. Days, which until now have been getting shorter, will begin to get longer, a process that will continue until the 21st of June, the summer solstice, when they will begin to shorten once again.
      The interesting thing about this period, or one of the interesting things, is how the change occurs. Like so many changes, it does not happen all at once. If you check the times of sunrise and sunset you'll see that as the day begins to expand on December 21st, it's only the sunset that stops happening earlier and begins to happen later, while sunrise actually continues to take place a little later each day, as it has been doing since June, only changing to earlier on January 6th or 7th, when sunrise and sunset together begin the six month process of expanding the day at both ends, sunrise getting earlier each day while sunset gets later. It's as though the morning continues on its downward path for another two weeks while the afternoon and evening are already turning towards spring. ...
      The European peoples tradition has set the turn of the year, New Year's Eve/Day, at a midpoint during this process. While the traditional solstice point is the 24th of December, opposite to the 24th of June, in ancient tradition the summer solstice, or Midsummer's Day (note that for centuries it was also the Feast of St. John the Baptist, and that it is also the date in 1604 when the Earl of Oxford is supposed to have died). Because the actual moment of transition can occur anywhere from twelve to forty-eight hours out of step with the dates assigned by the calendar, the 24th was the earliest that the ancients could be certain the transition had begun.
      Some readers may already have connected this period with the "Twelve Days of Christmas," which demarked, as the old carol describes, the period of holiday gift-giving, beginning on the day after Christmas and completing on the sixth of January, the twelfth night after Christmas. It cannot be coincidence that this period conforms exactly to "the wobble," the two week period when the forces that drive the planet are in conflict with each other, with the earth pulled one way from midnight to noon and another from noon to midnight, until the dayward pull completes its takeover on January 6th or 7th. That Shakespeare, and the ancient astronomers and astrologers, were acutely aware of this process cannot be denied. ...

top of page


Is the word 'Amen' the same as the Egyptian 'Amun'?

Amen     © Rae West 1999

Is the word 'Amen' derived from the Egyptian 'Amun'?

and other amen-related issues


Click for Top of this page
Click for Home page of entire big-lies.org site

Jews as usurpers: amusing modern example.
Left: 'Tutankhamun' mask. Right: faked orientalised version (ITV, 2016)
What is the origin of "Amen"? Looking through a sample of my downloaded rationalists, Ingersoll, Mangasarian, McCabe, Wheless,and A D White, I found, surprisingly, that not one of them considers this question anywhere. Let's examine it...
Concise Oxford Dictionary & Websters agree: "Hebrew Amen adopted into Greek". There's no comment on a possible Egyptian or Babylonian (or other) origin. "Hebrew = certainty, truth." or 'verily!'. A Biblical Dictionary agrees: true, truly. So be it. The gist is that 'amen' is the last word in truth.

A friend of mine (who shall remain nameless, but who knows some Hebrew) thinks Amen is formed on the acronym principle from three words (or syllables?) meaning God, King, and something else. This theory seems likely to be a retrospective fix-up.

A brief survey reveals there are be surprisingly few mentions in the OT. Psalms has some; and Deuteronomy has a long list along the lines of: 27:16: "Cursed be he that setteth light by his father or his mother. And all the people shall say, Amen." You can say that again!

But almost all (or all?) books in the NT contain 'Amen': e.g.: Corinthians 1 14:16: Else when thou shalt bless with the spirit, how shall he that occupieth the room of the unlearned say Amen at thy giving of thanks, seeing he understandeth not what thou sayest?

A few other samples:
Chaucer:
As seith my lord, so make us alle goode men,
And brynge us to his heighe blisse. Amen.

'Shakespeare': always uses it in an emphatic but not very religious sense, e.g.-
To cry amen to that, thus we appear.
My amen to't!
Count, take of me my daughter, and with her my fortunes: his grace hath made the match, and all grace say Amen to it.

Borrow's Romany Rye has something (but my copy is warehoused, so I can't check).

Typical modern constructions, used in assorted ceremonies from military to culinary, generally express unthinking assent, related to the traditional use as a device to show that the multitude are willing to be sheeplike:
For what we have received we thank the Lord. Amen.
For what we are about to receive may the Lord make us truly thankful. Amen.
Through Jesus Christ our Lord. Amen
In nomine patris et filii et spiritu sancti. Amen.

There's considerable variation in the spelling of Egyptian words. In 1922, when Howard Carter, working for Lord Carnarfon, first saw the 'solid bullion' in the tomb, he spelt the mummified inhabitant Tut-ankh-amen. The spelling 'Ammon Ra' was common then, too. By the 1930s Breasted wrote Tutankhamon. And by 1972, the British Museum presented the 'Treasures of Tutankhamun'. Websters spells Amun 'Amon'. This suggests - as might be expected from a language very long dead - that the pronunciation is largely guesswork, with the vowels more questionable than the consonants. 'Amun' and 'Amen' on this test could clearly be the same word.

On Egyptian influence, computer searching reveals miscellaneous points:

"The story in the Gospel of Luke, the first and second chapters is," says Malvert, "a reproduction, 'point by point,' of the story in stone of the miraculous birth of Amunothph."

Tuthmoses (also written Tut-Moses, Tuthmosis) is one suggestion of Jewish influence - whatever that means. Another example of this is in David Rohl, who uses Nile inundation records to try to find 'fat' and 'lean' years, and identifies the Amenemhat III Labyrinth and the Bahr Yussef canal as other evidences of 'Joseph'. This is one obvious possible route of transmission from Egypt of the word 'Amun'.

Everyone agrees Amun (or Amon) was originally the Egyptian god of the reproductive forces and, later as amalgamated with Ra (or Re) to form a superior Amun, the king of the gods. Quite a number of Pharaohs include Amun as part of their name: without worrying too much about spelling, or who these people were, I found with a search: Amenmesse, several Amenhoteps including Amenhotep IV who renamed himself Akhenaton, but apparently was defeated by the priests (who ritually defaced his mummy) in his attempt to make Aton the true and only god. Ary-mery-Amun, Amenimnisu, Amenemope, a collection of Amenemhets, and the famous Tutankhamun.

Could there be an Indian influence? There's a suggestion that 'amen' came into Christianity from India, 'Om being the traditional first name of god'. I have no idea whether there's anything in this.
The Egyptian 'Temple of Ammon' is etymologically related to the Greek for sand. (Says Holmyard). Alexander of Macedon - ["Alexander killed more Greeks than Persians; but don't say that to any Greek"] - was 'declared' a god by divine generation, by the Pagan Oracle of Jupiter Ammon. Alexander supposedly wanted to be buried in the Egyptian oasis (west of 'Alexandria') where this oracle, of 'zeus-ammon' (or Jupiter-Ammon) was. Alexander appears in the Quran as the 'two horned one', after a ram the supposed father of Ammon. Edom, Ammon, and Moab. Ammonites and lots on children of Ammon.
So there's convincing evidence for the existence of the name 'Amun' for thousands of years in Egypt; and for cultural contact which might have spread it. I don't know whether it's known whether the priests of Ammon Ra and Jupiter Ammon and the rest chanted "Amun" at any point in their proceedings - though they must surely have mentioned it occasionally. No doubt the conventional meaning in such Hebrew writings as exist now use 'amen' to as a confirming device. Whether they always did, and if so whether the meaning was the same I have no idea. However, one suspects the word must always have been a special, isolated word, not used in ordinary senses, but reserved for incantations.
So I conclude there's a strong a priori case for "Amen" simply being the name of the God Amun. It's amusing to contemplate the idea of people using a word for a couple of thousand years without realising its meaning.
Tailpiece: Most frivolous quasi-derivation? Irma Kurtz, when young, thought "A-men" in the US pronunciation was something to do with men.

Click for Top of this page

Click for Home page of entire big-lies.org site


HTML Rae West (randomised color technique). First uploaded 1999-02-12. Standalone file uploaded 5 Aug 2016. 'Tutankhamun' mask and prop 9 Nov 2016
.

George Harrison's Garden (and two more old photos)

© Rae West 1998, 1999

It struck me some surfers might like this trivial info on ex-Beatle George Harrison.
      In the early 1960s he bought a large house, situated on a hill on the way out of (or into) an Oxfordshire town, and popularly believed to have belonged to an eccentric stockbroker. (In England, anyone rich used to be thought of as a 'stockbroker'). This man had his house decorated with things like gnomes and, in its garden, is at least one artificial tumulus with a megalithic entranceway, leading into an artificial cave, fitted with such things as stalactites made of springs covered with papier mâché. I imagine this was in imitation of people like Hugh Walpole, who had an entire megalithic monument shifted from Jersey (I think - from memory). 'Crackerbox Palace' is how this house appears in a George Harrison song; it's also somewhere in the artwork of 'All Things Must Pass'. At least, this cave existed in the early 1960s, when a small group of us climbed over a wall and daringly had a look, before it was fenced. Below is an authentic photo! Incidentally, George employed his brother to help in his huge garden.

At the George Harrison residence

Two more old photos, in case anyone's interested. The image size in each case was about an eighth of an inch square, hence the blurry quality:—
Beatles Christmas Show, Finsbury Park, London. 1964?     Bob Dylan in Leicester England; 1966?
Left: Beatles at Finsbury Park Astoria 1964? | Right Bob Dylan at Leicester 1966?

Top of this page
big-lies.org

HTML Rae West First uploaded 98-04-08 This revn 98-06-21. Other old photos added 99-10-25. Slightly modified 99-12-30 on the news of a stabbing..



Top of this page
big-lies.org

MALE CIRCUMCISION: THE PROS, THE CONS, AND THE BOTTOM LINE

Anon dated 1996
Here's some online material from the Occidental Observer. Variety of viewpoints. 2010.

male circumcision in ancient Egypt
Detail redrawn from wall of tomb at Saqqara, c. 2300 BC. Illustration from British Museum Dictionary of Ancient Egypt, 1996 revision, by Ian Shaw and Paul Nicholson. ‘.. The Egyptians themselves may have regarded circumcision as an ethnic 'identifier', judging from depictions of foreigners in battle scenes...’

Is circumcision is an unnecessary ritual? Presumably in addition to the Biblical and other connections there's a financial consideration too—just as large numbers of children used to have their tonsils removed in the UK, for no very satisfactory medical reason—Rae West.

'Cultural' point: male circumcision is helpful in anal sex: is this the intention behind this 'Jewish'/ Moslem activity? Just as female 'circumcision' (in fact, removal of the clitoris) has the intention of removing female pleasure?—Rae West

THE ALLEGED BENEFITS
THE ALLEGED DISADVANTAGES AND RISKS
THE BOTTOM LINE
WHEN PARENTS DO DECIDE TO CIRCUMCISE
WHEN PARENTS DECIDE NOT TO CIRCUMCISE
REFERENCES [Note: some probably outdated]

THE ALLEGED BENEFITS

      1. Circumcision allegedly reduces the likelihood of UT Is.

Point: A number of studies indicate that circumcision significantly reduces the likelihood of urinary tract infections (UT Is) during infancy. Some studies have shown as much as a ten-fold reduction in the rate of UT Is in circumcised infants as compared to that in intact (not circumcised) infants.

Counterpoint: The rate of UT Is in intact infants is only about 1 or 2 in 100 (depending on which study is quoted) while the rate of complications from infant circumcision is about 4 in 100 (depending on exactly what is defined as a complication). For many reasons, it is difficult to compare the reduced likelihood of UT Is and the rate of complications from circumcision, but detailed comparisons seem to indicate that the benefits and risks cancel each other out.

      2. Circumcision allegedly reduces the likelihood of penile cancer.

Point: Although it is not unknown in circumcised men, penile cancer is most often seen in intact men.

Counterpoint: Penile cancer is extremely rare. It occurs in the United States in about 1 of 100,000 men per year (overall). Although the rate might be higher if we were to consider only intact men, the rate is simply not high enough to justify routine, infant circumcision. In addition, the causal agent in cancer of the penis is a known virus, and good hygiene appears to be a superior alternative to routine circumcision.
      In addition, penile cancer has been occasionally observed in circumcised men and it is often in the circumcision scar itself that this cancer occurs. In fact, one well-conducted study found that more than a third of those who were suffering penile cancer were circumcised.

      3. Circumcision allegedly reduces the likelihood of cancer of the cervix in one's female partner(s).

Point: (N/A)

Counterpoint: This has been fairly well laid to rest as simply untrue. Studies comparing the frequency of cervical cancer in Israeli women (whose husbands are almost always circumcised) with that of Scandinavian women (whose husbands are almost never circumcised) show no significant difference. In addition, there is a significant correlation between cervical cancer and both smoking and the presence of the Human Papilloma Virus (HPV); in other words, it is both factors in conjunction with each other which correlate with the likelihood of cervical cancer.

      4. Circumcision allegedly reduces the chance of contracting STDs and HIV infection.

Point: Several studies have shown a correlation between being intact and a higher likelihood of contracting STDs and HIV infection.

Counterpoint: Critics remind us that correlation does not prove causation. They point out that there are many methodological problems with these studies in that other possible factors, such as personal cleanliness and failure to practice safe sex, were not taken into account.
      In addition, the most optimistic estimates of benefits in reducing the frequency of STDs and HIV infection are marginal and are not likely realistic. In fact, a recent study concluded that there was no definitive benefit to circumcision in preventing STDs.

      5. Circumcision allegedly makes genital hygiene easier for the child.

Point: In the case of a properly performed circumcision, this is probably true.

Counterpoint: The key here is "properly performed." The fact is that an improperly performed circumcision can actually impede genital hygiene. Some circumcised children, for example, end up with adhesions and/or skin bridges which can impede hygiene and actually precipitate infections.
      In addition, many people believe that it is not justified to do amputative surgery of a normal body part in order to improve hygiene when parental instruction and/or supervision would probably suffice. The care of the intact penis is not difficult (see information at end of article); in fact, the foreskin should normally be left entirely alone for the first few years.

      6. The circumcised penis is allegedly more aesthetic.

Point: In the United States, where circumcision has been the norm, this is probably the viewpoint held by many parents.

Counterpoint: What is and is not aesthetically pleasing is in the eye of the beholder. In Europe, where circumcision is extremely rare, many people believe that a circumcised penis looks strangely deformed and ugly. In any case, a bungled circumcision can be especially unaesthetic even to an American. In addition, few men would likely want to accept diminished sexual sensitivity for the sake of a possible aesthetic benefit.

      7. A boy who is intact will allegedly feel awkward with his mostly circumcised peers and/or relatives. [This is often referred to as "locker room syndrome."]

Point: For some intact boys who are growing up among mostly circumcised peers or relatives, this can be a problem. It is not necessarily that there is teasing of an intact child by others, but rather that the child himself may feel "different." This feeling can be so intense that the child will resent not having been circumcised.

Counterpoint: Many children feel no such awkwardness. This is especially true when the parents support their child in being intact, letting him know why it was that they made the decision that they made. In addition, circumcision rates are dropping in the U.S. to the point that in a few places it is now the norm to be intact (California is an example). In many other places it is approaching a fifty-fifty situation.
      In addition, regardless of the status of peers and relatives, some men resent the fact that they were circumcised without having had any say in the matter; some become very resentful toward their parents. This is especially true in the case of a bungled circumcision.
      A recent nationwide survey of adult men which was done by "Men's Confidential" magazine clearly indicates that a significantly higher percentage of adult men who are intact are satisfied with their intact status than circumcised men are with their circumcised status.
      There are a number of men who are so dissatisfied with their circumcised condition that they are "restoring." In some cases, a surgical restoration is done, but more often restoring involves a long period of taping and stretching penile shaft skin until there is at least a semblance of foreskin. In this regard, it should be remembered that an intact individual can always choose to undergo a circumcision whereas a circumcised individual can never again become truly intact.

      8. A circumcision during infancy allegedly precludes the possibility of a circumcision later in childhood or adulthood when it would allegedly be more expensive, more painful, more traumatic, more complicated, and more likely to result in complications.

Point: It is probably true that a circumcision in later childhood or adulthood is more complicated and more expensive, and possibly more problematic and traumatic.
      It is also true that, in the U.S., 5% to 10% of intact children will eventually undergo a circumcision during childhood or adulthood, and this can be a traumatic experience. It is also true that a properly performed infant circumcision precludes the possibility of a later circumcision.

Counterpoint: The key is "properly performed." Surprisingly, it is not unheard of for children to undergo two or more circumcisions. A circumcision revision is sometimes done during the prepubertal period either to correct complications of an infant circumcision or simply because the parents and/or child are dissatisfied with the result of an infant circumcision. Some adults undergo a scar revision (or recircumcision) in adulthood.
      With regard to the possibility of an intact child requiring a circumcision in childhood, critics point out that U.S. doctors (who are mostly circumcised) are generally pro-circumcision as well as unfamiliar with either the advantages of remaining intact or the care of the intact penis. They are often unaware of alternative medical and surgical procedures which are far less drastic than circumcision and are simply too anxious to take the easy way out and circumcise when it is not truly necessary.
      With regard to pain, it should be noted that it is far easier and safer to control pain in the case of an older child or adult than it is in the case of an infant. Infant circumcisions are usually performed without anaesthesia and can be excruciatingly painful. In addition, the injection of local anaesthesia into free tissue (such as the penis) carries its own risks: it can, for example, cause permanent vascular and nerve damage. General anaesthesia, which should probably be the norm for circumcision of older children and adults, is simply too risky to use in the case of newborns.

THE ALLEGED DISADVANTAGES AND RISKS

      1. Circumcision is allegedly an unnecessary surgery which cannot be justified on medical grounds.

Point: Several cost-utility analysis studies have concluded that there is no cost-utility benefit to routine infant circumcision (i.e., that the minimal potential benefits of circumcision are offset by the disadvantages and risks).
      In addition, there are certain medical problems which are actually caused or aggravated by circumcision; one of these is meatal stenosis (a narrowing of the meatus, or urethral opening at the tip of the penis) which may later require surgical intervention. Meatal stenosis is far more often seen in circumcised children than in intact children and is, in fact, considered a consequence of circumcision. While the exact etiology is unknown, some studies point to the fact that the foreskin provides protection for the urinary meatus during the diaper period and/or that the frenular artery can be damaged during circumcision and result in ischemia (lack of proper blood supply) to the glans (head of the penis) and meatus.

Counterpoint: Lifetime cost-utility analysis is not usually a factor that enters into the decision of parents as to whether or not they will have their children circumcised.

      2. Circumcision, like any other surgery, puts a child at risk for possible harm.

Point: There is a definite risk associated with circumcision. Many parents (and even many doctors) do not realize the frequency or severity of complications that can and do occur as the result of circumcision. The complication rate for infant circumcision has been given as from 2% to 10% (depending on exactly what is considered a complication). If by complication we take it to mean an unwanted and unexpected result, the best estimate of the complication rate for infant circumcision is around 5%. The most common complications include bleeding, infection, the removal of too little or too much tissue, meatal stenosis, and scarring. Less common are skin bridges, skin tags, and loss of the tip of the glans. Even loss of the entire penis and death are not unheard of. Just about anything that could happen has happened.
      A child who has to live with a noticeable circumcision complication may be far worse off emotionally and physically than he would have been were he not circumcised in the first place.

Counterpoint: The operation is a fairly simple one which seldom has a significantly adverse outcome when performed by a skilled operator.

      3. There is a loss of erogenous tissue which is, in itself, allegedly worth saving. A drastic circumcision, especially, can result in a significant loss of sensitivity and sexual pleasure.

Point: Many men who were circumcised at an age of awareness confirm that there is a loss of sensitivity, sometimes severe.
      The foreskin is more richly innervated than the glans itself. In addition, certain structures associated with the prepuce, such as the highly sensitive frenum, are often partially or totally destroyed during a circumcision. To a greater or lesser extent (depending on the technique of the operator) the highly sensitive mucosa (what is often referred to as the "inner lining" of the foreskin) is lost to circumcision.
      Through exposure to the elements and a keratinizing process, the glans and whatever mucosa remains become much thicker and less sensitive. Many free nerve endings in the glans die off during this keratinizing process.
      In addition, inasmuch as the mucosa is normally adherent to the glans at birth, in order to perform an infant circumcision, it is usually necessary to separate the mucosa and the glans; doing so involves stripping or tearing the one from the other, often resulting in considerable trauma to both structures which may possibly have a lasting, detrimental effect on sensitivity and in some cases leaves noticeable pock marks on the glans and the mucosa.
      Some doctors seem to feel that a "good" circumcision is a "tight" circumcision. One of the most common complaints of circumcised adults is that erections are painful due to having had a too drastic circumcision. In this regard, it should be mentioned that it is not possible to judge with any degree of accuracy in the case of an infant how "tight" his circumcision will be when he is an adult.

Counterpoint: Barring an adverse circumcision complication, most circumcised men seem to have no trouble with sexual sensitivity and sexual performance. Many men who were circumcised at an age of awareness report no noticeable loss in sensitivity.

      4. There is allegedly considerable pain involved in a typical infant circumcision performed without anaesthesia.

Point: Many studies verify the fact that infants do feel pain and that they feel it intensely. Some of these studies indicate that they feel it even more intensely than do adults. There is no doubt that a circumcision without anaesthesia can be excruciatingly painful.
      In addition, there is a question as to the effectiveness of the various local anaesthetic techniques which are typically employed when anaesthesia is used in an infant circumcision. There is no question, however, that the use of local anaesthesia significantly increases the risk of complications and in itself has the potential to cause vascular and nerve damage. General anaesthesia is simply too risky for use in the case of infant circumcision.

Counterpoint: Because the nervous system is not fully developed at birth, some allege that infants do not feel pain in the same way that adults do. It is claimed that this is evidenced by the fact that some infants seem to be relatively unaware that they are undergoing circumcision.

      5. A boy who is circumcised will allegedly feel awkward with his mostly intact peers or relatives. [This is often referred to as "locker room syndrome."]

Point: For some circumcised boys who are growing up among mostly intact peers or relatives, this can be a problem. It is not necessarily that there is teasing of a circumcised child by others who are intact, but rather that the child himself may feel "different." The problem is often more pronounced in the case of a circumcised child who is among others who are intact than it is in the case of an intact child who is among others who are circumcised for the reason that a circumcised child has had a part of his penis cut off and may feel more "exposed" and deprived. This is especially likely when there is significant scarring, discoloration, an adhesion, a skin bridge, a skin tag, or any noticeable complication resulting from circumcision.
      Some children are devastated when they first learn that a part of their penis has been cut off and disposed of. This feeling can be very intense to the point that the child will resent having been circumcised. In at least a few cases, this has caused real problems between parents and children at some point down the road.

Counterpoint: Many children feel no such awkwardness. This is especially true when the parents support their child in being circumcised, letting him know why it was that they made the decision that they made. In addition, although circumcision rates are dropping in the U.S., it is still the norm in some parts of the country.

      6. There is an alleged human rights issue involved.

Point: Many humanitarians feel that a child has a right to an intact body. They feel that it is unethical for parents to seek or for doctors to cooperate in performing genital surgery on unconsenting minors when there is no clear, medical need (i.e., disease or trauma). In fact, it would appear that routine infant circumcision violates the February 1995 statement of the American Academy of Pediatrics Committee on Bioethics regarding informed consent, parental permission, an assent in pediatric practice, stating that in the case of nonessential treatments, which could be deferred without substantial risk, physician and family should wait until the child's consent could be obtained.
      It should be noted that while tattooing of children has been outlawed in some states, parents in those same states can opt to have their sons circumcised. In addition, while most Americans decry the practice of female "circumcision" in other cultures, they are alone in the world in sanctioning the practice of nonreligious circumcision on such a high percentage of males. Humanitarians tend to see this as inconsistent.

Counterpoint: Parents often make decisions to have medical and/or surgical procedures performed on and in behalf of their children. Inoculations and orthodontic work are two examples. Infants and young children are not in a position to make these decisions for themselves, therefore parents act in behalf of their children.

THE BOTTOM LINE

      There is no clear cut medical basis on which to make a valid decision to circumcise. Therefore, the decision to circumcise represents a parental choice and nothing more.
      Circumcision does provide some minimal, potential health benefits such as a lowered risk of UT Is, penile cancer, and foreskin problems. These are offset, however, by the disadvantages and risks.
      Although most circumcision complications are quite minor, some are quite serious. Any decision to circumcise should be made with this in mind.
      While it is true that circumcision can actually improve sexual pleasure in the case of an adult male who has a problem which is corrected by circumcision, the fact is that circumcision diminishes sexual sensitivity and pleasure to a greater or lesser extent (depending on exactly how it is performed) in the case of a normal male when there is (or would have been) no such problem.
      There is a human rights issue involved. While many parents correctly believe that they have a right to make medical decisions in behalf of their children, many others believe that circumcision in the absence of disease or trauma is not properly a medical decision. They question whether genital surgery performed on unconsenting minors can be justified on the basis of parental preference.

      All things considered, it is the author's opinion that routine circumcision cannot be justified either on medical grounds or on the basis of parental preference.

WHEN PARENTS DO DECIDE TO CIRCUMCISE

      When parents decide to circumcise, thought should be given to who will do the surgery and how it will be done. Too many parents are willing to take potluck in this regard; that is, the surgery is performed by their child's primary care physician in whatever manner he or she happens to perform it. Better to choose a doctor who regularly does circumcisions and who is well-trained to do them. A pediatric urologist is probably the best choice.
      In addition, it is not a bad idea to discuss -- ahead of time -- exactly how the operation will be performed. Will anaesthesia be employed? If so, what type and why? What technique will be used for the operation itself? How much tissue will be removed? Will care be taken to preserve the frenum and a good deal of the mucosa?

WHEN PARENTS DECIDE NOT TO CIRCUMCISE

      The important thing to remember is that, in the infant and very young child, no special care is required of an intact penis. It is especially important that no one (this includes mothers and the child's physician) attempt to forcibly retract the child's foreskin. (Doing so can cause the very problem for which physicians will often recommend circumcision.) The first person to retract a child's foreskin should be the child himself.
      During the first years of life, the foreskin and glans are normally connected to each other (in the same way that the fingernails are attached to the fingers) by a common membrane called the synechia. This connective tissue dissolves naturally during the child's lifetime so that the percentage of boys who have retractable foreskins increases with age. By adolescence, the vast majority of boys will have retractable foreskins.
      Once the foreskin has become retractable, the child should be taught to practice good hygiene. The following instructions given by the parent or caretaker may be helpful: 1.) Gently pull your foreskin back. 2.) Rinse with warm water. 3.) Pull your foreskin back in place over the head of your penis.

REFERENCES [NOTE: Many may be outdated]

Adult Penile Circumcision: Erotosexual and Cosmetic Sequelae. Journal of Sexual Research, 1983 Aug, vol 19, pp 289-292.
Answers to Your Questions about Your Young Son's Intact Penis. (Brochure) National Organization of Circumcision Information Resource Centers (NOCIRC); P.O. Box 2512, San Anselmo, CA 94979-2512.
Attitudes and Practices Regarding Analgesia for Newborn Circumcision. Pediatrics, 1993 Oct 4, vol 92, pp. 541-543.
Circumcision: A Decision Analysis of its Medical Value. Family Medicine, 1991 Nov-Dec, vol 23, pp. 587-593.
Circumcision. A medical of a Human Rights Issue? Journal of Nurse Midwifery, 1992 Mar-Apr, vol 37, pp. 87s-96s.
Circumcision and Sexually Transmitted Diseases. American Journal of Public Health, vol 84, #2, 1994 Feb, pp. 197-201.
Circumcision in Children Beyond the Infant Period. Pediatrics, 1993 Dec, vol 92, pp. 791-793.
Circumcision Decision: Prominence of Social Concerns. Pediatrics, 1987 Aug, vol 80, pp. 215-219.
Circumcision No Longer a "Routine" Surgical Procedure. Canadian Medical Association Journal, 1995 Jun 1, vol 152, pp. 1873-1876.
Circumcision Revision in Prepubertal Boys.... Journal of Urology, 1995 Jan, vol 153, pp. 180-182.
Clinical Presentation and Pathophysiology of Meatal Stenosis following Circumcision. British Journal of Urology, 1994 Jan, vol 75, pp. 91-93.
Complications of Circumcision. British Journal of Surgery, 1993, Oct, vol 80, pp. 1231-1236.
Early Adolescent Knowledge and Attitudes about Circumcision.... Journal of Adolescent Health, 1992 Jun, vol 13, pp. 293-297.
Is the Risk of UT I Really the Pivotal Issue? Clinical Pediatrics, 1992 Feb, pp. 100-104.
Management of Foreskin Problems. Archives of Diseases of Children, 1991 Jun, vol 66, pp.696-697.
Male Circumcision Satisfaction. Men's Confidential. 1996, March.
Neonatal Circumcision. Urological Clinics of North America, 1995 Feb, vol 22, pp. 57-65.
Newborn Circumcision. American Family Pediatrics, 1988 Oct, pp. 151-155.
Pain and its Effects in the Human Neonate and Fetus. New England Journal of Medicine, 1987 Nov 19, vol 317, pp. 1321-1329.
Preputial Plasty: A Good Alternative to Circumcision. Journal of Pediatric Surgery, 1994 Apr, vol 29, pp. 561-563.
Relation of Circumcision to Cancer of the Cervix. American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology, 1973 Dec, vol 177, pp. 1056-1065.
Routine Neonatal Circumcision: A Cost-Utility Analysis. Medical Decision Making, 1991 Oct-Dec, vol 11, pp. 282-289.
The Circumcision Decision. American Baby, 1996 Mar, pp. 70-73.
The Circumcision Question. Postgraduate Medicine, 1992 May 1, vol 91, pp. 237-242, & 244.
The Prepuce: Specialized Mucosa of the Penis and its Loss to Circumcision. British Journal of Urology 1996 Feb, vol 77, pp. 291-295.
The Question of Routine Neonatal Circumcision, New England Journal of Medicine, 1990 May 3, vol 322, pp. 1312-1314.

First uploaded to Internet by Rae West 98-01-18; revised 98-09-22; reuploaded 2013-04-28; anal sex and removal of clitoris note added 2013-11-05 .



Diana Spencer: the Peoples' Tributes

Landmines. ©Watch Tower Bible and Tract Society

Rae West © 1998, 1999, 2000

Summary: I copied down as accurately as possible the following epitaphs and encomia (in Lincoln cathedral, September 1997 - the reader must imagine piles of intensively-grown industrial flowers plus the occasional toy or decoration, with messages attached). These are a tiny sample of the total. So far as I noticed, none mentioned her campaign on land-mines.
      Chomskyan linguistics asserts that the number of sentences is 'infinite', and that ordinary language has something like unbounded descriptive power. Perhaps Noam was wrong?
        Since then I've added a note on her father, and a poem by Hal Roberts.

Top of this page
big-lies.org


  • The Poppy is the Symbol of Remebrences. You'll never be forgotten Diana for all your unconditional love and support you showed the world. I miss you. I love you. Lesley, Giles & Baby Hannah
  • I Love You DIANA   Love Natalie aged 7 years
  • BORN A LADY/ DIED A LEGEND/ YOU WERE THE JEWEL IN THE CROWN/ REST IN PEACE DANA
  • For Dianna/ You were a shining light, an example to follow. You were Truly the Queen of the Nation's hearts
  • To Diana & Dodi/ We are so sorry we have lost you. May you both rest in peace and be happy together in heaven
  • My dear Diana,/ Oh! I wish I had met you. Though I feel I knew you very well, you caring and sweetness is something we shall treasure. The nation and the world mourn you - there will never be another like you, though William will make a fine king, your legacy to us./ Thank you
  • Charlotte Brereton, aged 12/ Dear Father in Heaven,/ Let us remember the tragic day of Princess Diana's death. Let us remember her how she was Happy, Determined, Caring and Loving. So many people loved her because of how she acted towards people. ... Amen
  • For Dodi/ You gave joy and happiness to the princess. Be Together in Paradise.
  • Diana our love to a beautiful princess a tragic loss. Why oh why? No longer in our sight, but forever in our hearts and thoughts. For gods safekeeping.. god bless Debbie
  • Diana and Dodi/ May you rest in peace/ The Queen of everybody's hearts much loved and sadly missed/ Love alway's/ Debbie
  • Diana and Dodi/ Together, at play in Gods garden./The Johnson Family
  • Such a sad loss/ Janet Wood
  • Safe with God/ Sheila and Brian Wilson
  • Diana, The New Age Princess of awareness Shine Your light to the world/ [woman's name]
  • Diana, Princess of heart, you will be greatly missed rest in peace [female then male name, and surname]
  • Lovely Place. V. Thorne.
  • In Memory of our FIRST LADY. An Example to us all. Naomi.
  • The Peoples Princess/ Never Forgotten/ Forever Loved

Top of this page

Diana's father had the misfortune to die a lonely death. (I forget the details; but they involved a final painful illness alone in his private hospital room). People wishing to be informed on this depressing topic might look at our Private hospitals in Britain site.



Hal Roberts was good enough to email on 8 Jun 2000, with this:—
I found your web site about Diana. I wrote a tribute to Diana in 1997 while on the road with The Smothers Brothers. We were in Las Vegas at the time.
    I think I sent this poem to the website recieving these kind of things but, thought I would send it to someone again on the request of a friend.
    Would like to send it to the official Diana site in England but don't know where it is. No matter right now.

Camelot Lost
* * *
Sleep peacefully our beauty, no Lancelot for you.
You've brightened our hearts, and we bid you au du.
You'll come again to shine, in a kingdom that's devine,
A Camelot that lives, for another day and time.
Our hearts' are clearly broken, and the world has loudly spoken,
We'll miss you, my dear, you were our Gwynevere.
Hal Roberts - 9/4/97


Top
big-lies.org

HTML Rae West First uploaded 98-01-26 This revn 98-06-21 Spencer added 99-12-22 Hal Roberts 2000-06-09.



Plant Drugs: Opium, Heroin, Cannabis, Coca...

Everyone is told that spices were one of the reasons for trade with tropical countries. (Plants in hot countries typically have far more energy input, and are more able to synthesise exotic chemicals: in colder countries plants tend to struggle to keep alive).

Most plant products with no immediately obvious function presumably result from some evolutionary process: some are not liked by mammals, fungi, animals underground, worms, or other things: ginger roots presumably are less likely to be eaten, mint isn't liked by rabbits, lemons are highly acidic, cabbage leaves when bitten have an unpleasant taste, peppers can't be eaten casually, and so on. Some plants (e.g. ferns) make anti-vitamins; some are poisonous, which may help them get protein if they have corpses near them; and some have evolved psychoactive properties, no doubt not just in human beings.

There are many ways in which people found it useful to process food, usually to make it last: drying (in hot climates), salting (if there's salt), smoking (if there's wood), adding bacteria (yoghurt). Fermentation, if genes to digest ethyl alcohol are plentiful in the gene pool, has been fairly widespread. Tea, tobacco, cocoa are typical of processed plant products which aren't particularly useful, but many people like. There seems to be a gradation, and it's easy to guess some plant products have evolved to be harmful, possibly over a long time.

I've met people who deny that 'addiction' exists, though I wouldn't like to test that idea myself. Normal life has processes which lead to fatigue, tiredness, satiation, desire for change; otherwise presumably people might never stop eating, never stop drinking, never stop communicating, never stop liking some piece of music or some sensation, never stop exercising. As far as I know, nobody has much idea how such processes work, but it's presumably possible that plants, by chance, evolved chemical methods to damp and weaken some such processes. If so, there would be a genetic component: it's well-established that there are differences in reactions to chemicals (such as lactose, for example, or thiourea, or allergens).

This is not really the place to discuss the part played by Jews in the Opium Wars against China. However there seems to be a re-run, with US involvement in cocaine from south America and also heroin (i.e. processed opium poppy) from parts of Asia. It appears the British Army guards opium poppy fields in Afghanistan, after they'd been removed by the locals. I happened to hear a very good talk on this issue (click the youtube for a leaflet, read out for about 6 minutes) by a man whose son had (I've been told) been incapacitated by heroin. Unfortunately he hasn't made a follow-up video, due, he told me, to police pressure.
Top of this page
big-lies.org


Tony Bamber's heroin leaflet 2010
After two years' harassment, Tony Bamber's heroin and Islam factsheet, distributed in Lancashire, NW England, was cleared by a jury in June 2010. Det 'Superintendent' Neil Hunter of Lancashire Constabulary was quoted as saying 'While we are disappointed with today's decision, we accept the decision of the court. We have worked very closely with the Crown Prosecution Service throughout this inquiry..' Very nice of him to 'accept' a jury's decision, though I'm not sure many people will share his feelings of disappointment. Why would he be disappointed? Does he like heroin and addiction and Islam? Does he get something out of it? (Was the 'quotation' accurate?)
 
 
Clear Thinking about 'Recreational Drugs' has some interesting different viewpoints, including the idea that many plants have opiate-like substances in them.

Uploaded 2013-11-05



The Colosseum as it is today. No Christians were ever thrown to lions there.

Medieval chess joke
Mediaeval chess joke. [Brother Jews advising the kings of opposite sides; and religion split between nominal Christians and nominal Jews.]

Was early Christianity Hijacked by Jews? And Islam Invented by Jews?

© Rerevisionist 2016, 2017
Quick Summary of this Article's 2000 Years
Modern-day unremitting pushing by Jews worldwide for the fraud of 'Holocaustianity' suggests the same process may have been used in ancient times to push another Jewish fraud, 'Christianity'.
Early Christian opinions are not known; or perhaps were hidden. It is possible their opinions may have included opposition to Jews. And it is possible Jews reacted by taking over or corralling early Christianity.
It must be understood that 'Christianity' originally was a Greek expression, probably NOTHING to do with the Jewish 'Yeshua' fiction. Most of the documents relating to the period were destroyed; critics attributed the destruction to Christians, but destruction is a Jewish modus operandi.
Palestine is geographically near Greece, and Greek colonies in Turkey.
The attempt to insert crude Jewish literary junk into Greek areas, civilised for centuries, failed.
Whenever possible (Egypt; Babylon; some aspects of Rome; Europe; modern Germany, modern Iraq ...) Jews malign and destroy with complete disregard for truth. For this reason, serious historians must separate out the influence of Jews—for example, Nero vs rich Romans, the 'black legend' of Spain, the 'glorious Revolution' in England, Napoleon moving east, Holland and Britain moving west, India, the opium wars, both world wars ...) if they are to have any hope of understanding events.
The forced conversion of Rome took centuries; helped by the fraud of the Donation of Constantine.
In the words of Bertrand Russell; '... the most important of Christian doctrines was ‘we ought to obey God rather than man.’ ... a precept to which nothing analogous had previously existed, except among the Jews. This introduces the contrast between individual conscience, and the medium of the Church. Obviously, if Jews can persuade people they are official experts on God, they can infiltrate their own persuasions.
About a century later, Augustine's City of God was published. I've seen it suggested plausibly that the book was aimed at non-Jew populations, to try to reconcile them to Jewish taxation, ruin, opening of gates, and imposition of Christianity. Perhaps analogously to 'Puritanism' and vernacular Bible translations.
One might speculate that Cohen, Kahan, Khan, Kuhn... were opposed to Caesars, Kaisers, Tsars...
Islam appears to have been invented by Jews, who by then were at their last gasp, having sucked Rome dry.
Islam was probably designed to convert indolent Arab masses into a force of thugs. Jews used them and manipulated them to suck parts of the Roman empire (such as Spain) and also to attack east though there were geographical obstacles.
Particularly for US readers, Will Durant (next generation after Wells' Outline of History), was interested in Jews and Islam, and their invasions and damage.
It's a possibility that Islam from the start was manufactured (by making secret promises to both sides) as two rival groups, Sunni and Shi-ite, for divide-and-rule purposes. Offering support to one or other depending on the situation later.
Khazaria seems to have been targetted by colonisation, or conversion, or both, for Jew alliances.
The Roman Church was heavily Jew-influenced. Probably (1) the idea of Jews hating Yeshua was inserted to pretend the Church was a defence against Jews; (2) the supposed attack on usury was probably to keep the monopoly for Jews; (3) burnings of the Talmud, reported fairly often, were probably designed to remove the Talmud from inspection; (4) the Church propagandised poor people to damp down criticism of Jews; (5) the Church often aided Jews—possibly the reason Jews in the USA propagandise 'sanctuaries'; (6) the Roman Church was far harsher and cruel than many people can easily understand now.
Jews probably had a centuries-old hatred for Byzantine Christianity, culminating in its invasion and massacres by Muslim thugs. Much of the manoeuvring of alliances, weapons, and so on must be viewed as Jew-controlled.
jews in china

Jews may have a folk belief in the excellence of the Middle Ages since they took over the western Church, had a large influence in Islam, and embarked on a series of invasions—think of (for example) Venice, events in Poland, and the invasion of Britain. This is not an attitude natural to westerners, and may help explain the zest of 'Jews' in harming the west. See below: Jews, Roman Catholics, Protestants, Aristocrats
Lorenzo Valla 'On the Donation of Constantine' (15th century) is usually treated simply as a discoverer of a fake, but it could well be that the time was considered ripe for an attack, and other material resurfaced. Many debunkings occur when vested interests shift.
The words 'Jews' in Britain is relatively recent, coinciding more or less with the invention of printing in England. Probably much the same remark applies to other languages.
19th-20th century westerners were influenced to an almost infantile level by Biblical Jewish nonsense, leading to disasters such as the US Civil War, and the World Wars in Europe and elsewhere.
Despite perpetual 'Jewish' lies, large numbers of people know by now that 'Communism' as installed in Russia in the Jewish Coup was 'Jewish'.
Many 19th-20th century writers, not understanding Jews, believed tolerance of Jews to be a mark of enlightenment, which is why they were unable to understand the threat of Islam. They thought Islam was a tolerant religion, because it was thought to be fairly kind to Jews—without understanding that Islam had been set up by Jews, with the Quran as a military-style manual.
New to me is the idea that 'Chinese Communism' was yet another Jew fix-up. I'm not sure I would have noticed if they'd chosen a Chinese name; however, rereading some of Joan Robinson, an economics professor at Cambridge of complete unintelligence and unoriginality, made it obvious enough.


Below: Importance of the Greeks as Target
Below: Consequences, including Islam.
Below: Variations on the theme - Joseph Atwill and Rome. And Greece.
Below: Extreme Slowness of Spread of Christianity
Below: Jews, Catholics, Protestants, Aristocracies
Below: United Nations as A Jew 'Religion'

This is an idea new to me, and perhaps genuinely new.
Here are a few starting-point puzzles –
  • Why did the Bible, when it was finally printed, include the 'Old Testament'? Why not just have Christian material? (I'm agnostic about the Latin (Roman Catholic) and presumably Greek (Byzantine) versions; for all I know the 'Old Testament' might have been treated as inferior, or consisted of different books).
  • Early Christianity seems to have been named after the Greek word meaning 'illuminated' or 'golden', in a similar sense to 'the light of the world' or 'bright spirit'. Hence the chi-rho and fish symbol.
  • The importance of the Greek Empire in early Christianity
  • The Romans appear to have had the idea of amalgamating and collecting together parts of extant religions from their part of the world, with the intention of psychologically unifying their unstable empire. Sensible enough, and perhaps a precursor to the idea of 'conversion', which must have seemed a new outlook to tribal peoples.
  • Constantine's genuine or supposed conversion in 312 A.D. is of course about three centuries after the supposed birth of 'Jesus Christ'
  • Evidence of such things as the faked 'Holocaust' and faked attribution of the 9/11 demolitions is impressive proof that Jews are persistent liars; they will never stop lying.
  • Evidence shows Jews have no scruples in manufacturing or destroying evidence.
  • Evidence shows Jews may claim to have invented or originated anything considered desirable. Modern evidence shows Jews, if they lied to claim to have taken part in establishing Christianity, will lie more, claiming progressively more influence over the past.
  • Whether ancient 'Jews' are related to modern 'Jews' is a controversial question; but the same written 'laws' and stories can reasonably be supposed to affect populations subject to them in similar ways. Ancient 'Jews' must therefore be suspected of being persistent liars, too.
A popular religion, perhaps Roman-slave-based, or perhaps more generally based, which professed to enlighten people, might reasonably be expected to include elements from Roman, perhaps with other tribal and national elements. There might (for example) have been books of Persian beliefs, of Babylonian beliefs, of Egyptian beliefs, and other long-established written sources. No doubt with Christian material showing why they were wrong or obsolete or unenlightened.

I'd like to suggest there may have been a process, over several centuries, in which Jews made up their own stories about 'Yeshua', also known as 'the Christ', or 'Jesus Christ', and insisted upon them in their Jewish group way, redefining 0 A.D. as a starting-point for their own purposes. Three centuries is about the length of time taken for Jews to take over England, then the USA, and invent and promote bogus histories, so the time scale seems plausible enough.

In short, I suspect the 'Old Testament' progressively was forced into Christianity, despite having no connection whatever with the origins of Christianity. And the 'New Testament' itself was Judaised, replacing genuine early Christian works.

The idea is reinforced by plenty of examples of bogus religions fostered by Jews, including many aspects of the Reformation, Quakers, Mormonism, and Christian Science.

THE IMPORTANCE OF THE GREEK EMPIRE TO EARLY CHRISTIANITY
It's important to understand that early Jewish efforts seems to have been directed to Greece, not Rome. Latin Christianity was accidental, dependant on Constantine's victory. Consider that:
  • The 'Christos' idea, 'ichthyos' etc are Greek words. 'Episkopi' (bishops) are overseers in Greek. 'Peter' is a Greek word, for 'rock' And so on.
  • The Gospels were written in Greek; not Latin, Aramaic, Hebrew.
  • The Greek Testament is the original form of the books that make up the New Testament as they appeared in Koine [i.e. popular] Greek. To quote Wikipedia.
  • For two or three centuries, Greek was the language of the Roman church.
  • Greek (or 'Attic') cities dotted the coastline and interior in all the areas north and northwest of Palestine, including in what's now Turkey. (See map). In other words, the area would be relatively familiar to them. Thesallonians were in a region of Greece. Corinth was a Greek city.
  • Greek cities in what's now Turkey continued to be important to Christianity: Nicaea, for example, Ephesus, and of course Byzantium. Note that there is some confusion over names: there are several of Alexandria; several Antiocheia (one of these being Tarsus).
  • Greek was the official language of the Roman Church during the first two or three centuries.

    —Greek influence in about 1 BC.—
    Black dots = Greek cities founded <336 BC
    Green dots: Greek cities founded 336-1BC
    Yellow dots: Non-Greek Hellenised cities

    —Greek influence: Byzantine Empire about 1000— AD.
    Blue: Greek Orthodox
    Green: Slavonic Orthodox
    Grey: Georgian Orthodox
    Red: Latin Christendom.


Last Supper


REPRISE... same idea, different wording
After a few tests, I realise many people can't understand the new view of the New Testament I'm making. So I'll retry...

[1] Bear in mind that Jesus NEVER EXISTED; see abundant material on this point. The 'Acts' are not a historical record. The 'Gospels' are self-contradictory and ridiculous.

Put this together with
[2] Jews, today, TELL LIES ALL THE TIME.
These are joint, collective lies, which persist over long stretches of time. And clearly have intention behind them. Motives include promoting wars, getting the Fed for Jews, changing propaganda schemes to face new enemies or to work for new wars for Jews, continual statistical lies on e.g. black crime, retrospective lies for example on the history of the Soviet Union, and the history of science, with a view towards skewing things to what they evidently think are Jewish interests.

So we have hypothesis
[3] I'm saying the NT was just another set of Jewish lies.
Not stories, not history, not an honest attempt at a record. But purely for Jewish aim(s). Perhaps heading off an early religion in the Roman Empire, which looked likely to form a new composite religion. I won't name it, as that will confuse people. Jews may have seen this, and thought "Oy vey, we can make money from this" or "Oy veh, God chose us to lead these stupid goyim" or "Oh vey, papyrus is cheap these days & we'll hire Greek scribes to write out our stories" or "We are the experts in official religion, so we're entitled to tell lies" or all four. So they wrote a whole set of stories, based around 'Yeshua', almost as Spielberg composed his absurd films, Weisel orated his lies for a lifetime, or Jewish 'historians' of the holohoax orchestrate and embroider their lies. The main point was to get them out, published, available to be forced onto people; further detail could come after. After a few centuries of intimidation and/or repetition and/or bribery and/or selection of fake leaders, they added the OT to the NT to reinforce their claims. This time frame is similar to e.g. forcing Jewish history over whites for the last four centuries or so.
    I've seen the argument that US Jewish-controlled 'Universities' now all accept the Bible as reliable 'proof'—since even Marxists accept this! But of course if the whole thing was just a Jewish set of stories, like the 'mainstream media', Marxists would be likely to support it, whatever the evidence, just as Jews would.

NOTE THAT it doesn't even matter if there was a genuine, new, morally original figure, for example Lucius Calpurnius Piso. All they had to do was put forward their own lies and—provided there was sufficient promotional push and destruction of opposition—Piso would be forgotten. Jews often do this; for example, the leading physicist over the last few centuries was Newton, so Einstein was manufactured as a substitute. To take a totally different example, the Beatles were one of the most influential music groups of the 20th century. If Jews started a promotional myth that 'The Bagels' were the best ever, with their famous 'Abbey Schul' and 'Light Blue Album' achievements, who can tell whether this would be accepted in 300 years' time?

NOTE ALSO that the Bible uses many techniques which show in Jewish films. For example, scene-setting and opinion-setting. Many Jewish films start with fictional stuff on how actress X is the most beautiful woman in the world, collecting her beauty award, and gasped at by big crowds. In the same way, the 'Jesus' figure is supported by miracles, impossible events, epigrams supposed to suggest wisdom, marvels, scatterings of enemies, etc etc. Rather oddly, this feature seems to be the basis of many people's reaction, which is that the Bible is full of reliable and accurate material—something like the opposite of the truth.

AND NOTE that the Catholic Church of course was fronted by non-Jews, most of the time, but they had their own views on what mattered, leading to interminable cryptic disputes. No doubt the Roman Empire's collapse was helped by such rented people diverting assets away from the state, and ordinary people. A situation recognisably similar to the present day.

If you see my point, I'd welcome serious comments. I'd particularly welcome comment on Churches post- about 500 AD, and interactions between Jews and non-Jews, and on e.g. money - Gold? Silver? paper money promotion? And the invention of Islam, and the Khazar issue. And of course promotion of wars and invasions, as parallels with modern times. Discoveries of new territories and the corresponding increases in ease of travel. Venice? Trade routes? William the Conqueror, Cromwell, Napoleon, the Reformation, Renaissance, Thirty Years War, 20th century .... Any insights, based on the idea that the Bible was a Jewish promo job; what were they trying to promote, in different eras? There may well be insights waiting to be seen and outed! [Added 21 Sept 2016)

ANOTHER NOTE: The New Testament does not mention Christianity at all—understandably, as the Church did not exist at the time. Only the fictional Jesus/Yeshua. So if some other religion (say, Mithraism, or Gnosticism, or RomanEmpirism, or Anythingism, or pan-Paganism, or revivedBabylonism) had emerged, the NT could be used against them, so Jews could muscle in. They may have prepared stories, later dropped, to plan for these eventualities—in the same way modern 'Jews' prepare media campaigns against Germans, Vietnamese, whites, Iraqis, Moslems etc. [Added 22 Sept 2016]



SECOND REPRISE... same ideas, reworded
Here's a review of a little-known but forceful small book on Jesus as a myth.

A longer and more detailed book is Prof. G A Wells' The Historical Evidence for Jesus (1982; published by Prometheus Books in the USA). Neither of these authors, Robertson or Wells, has any concept of 'Kosher' forces which successfully agitated for, then imposed, 'Jesus Christ' on top of early Christianity, which, if it even existed as a genuine non-Jewish movement, had no place for a 'Yeshua'. Prometheus Books is an arm of the 'skeptics', US people funded by Jews; Wells would not have been published, had he been Jew-aware.

archibald-robertson-jesus   Review of   Archibald Robertson: Jesus: Myth or History?

Valuable, Condensed, Thorough, and Little-known Measured Criticism of 'Jesus' Considered as a Genuine Personage. Helps Pave the Way for Future Understanding.
  Review by Rerevisionist, Jan 7th, 2017
I have a copy of this book, in the original small-format red hardback of the 'Thinker's Library'. First printed 1946, second edition 1949. Most Thinker's Library volumes were bound in brown, with black printing, and with a one-colour on white dust-jacket in their Watts & Co. house style. There are other editions, some, I think, more or less pirated; or perhaps the copyright situation isn't clear. Whether these are accurate, I don't know; for interested readers I'd recommend an original copy, just in case.

The contents are more or less chronological, with Chapter 1 containing Christian writings, Chapter 2 writings by everyone else—with some overlap—and Chapter 3 leaping forward to post-Reformation times, no doubt because criticism of the Bible in the Middle Ages is difficult to find. I'd guess Robertson—British son of a theologian in Durham, and impeccably public-schooled and degreed—absorbed much of the material in his father's house. I haven't found any supposed texts showing the existence of Jesus, not found in Robertson. (The book has a fairly detailed helpful index).

My view is that, at the time of the various commentators, nobody influential appreciated the fact the Jews, who were, presumably, behind the Jesus promotion, seem to have a genetic tendency to lie—something which may go back to the days when language was still developing, in the remotest depths of time. Much as visual camouflage would not have evolved until sight had developed, modes of use of language could not predate speech. It's now clear that Jews have an exceptional tendency to lie—this may be compared to some creatures which lie [pun not really intended!] rather than fly, when in danger. Before the days of technological aids, such as writing, and, now, photographs and fingerprints and videos etc etc etc, convincing liars must have been hard to detect. It's now plausible that Jews made up the 'New Testament' as a Jewish fantasy, or film script, or advertisement, or promotion of a Jewish 'hero' aimed at gullible goyim. It's what they do. People who describe Christianity as a 'Jewish Trojan horse' are no doubt correct.

The idea that there was a ferment of religious ideas in the Roman Empire may also be untrue. It's now known that Jewish strategies include defaming and subverting and critiquing rival societies; it's entirely likely the supposed unease leading to religious change was a Jewish manufacture.

The remaining problem is how Jews could have done this; they didn't have the Federal Reserve to print them endless money. They may have had the ear of prominent Romans. They may have used unreliable, dysfunctional, disgruntled people to spread the world, much as non-Jewish 'Marxists' now, and in the past, often fit this description, and often co-operate in treachery which is mildly profitable to them.

A modern question which may occur to the reader is why a Jew-based publishing house should risk subverting their racial group with a serious presentation of the idea of the non-existence of 'Yeshua'. There have been alternations in self-images of Christians, and I'd guess their feeling was that Christians in 1945 were a bit too independent. The story of Jewish collaborators through the centuries hasn't begun to be described yet.


CONSEQUENCES AND POSSIBILITIES
Fairly modern map; the Aral Sea was once larger. Showing likely areas of religious takeovers by Jews.

Very roughly (places & names change):
UA=Ukraine, AM=Armenia. R=Rome. C=Constantinople. J=Jerusalem. M=Medina.

Arabs occupied a large area, and were well positioned to take over the remains of the Roman Empire, much of it around the Mediterranean Sea.
Note: ‘The established presence of Islam in the region that now constitutes modern Turkey dates back to the latter half of the 11th century, when the Seljuks started expanding into eastern Anatolia’ says Wikipedia.
Note: a silk route between Europe and China went north of the Khazar enclave, marked K. The Khazars had mountain and water barriers to the south, and were well-positioned to act with (or against) Silk Route merchants—and Huns, and Mongols, and the Chinese. And the Kaifeng Jews, visually indistinguishable from Chinese.


ISLAM can convincingly be claimed to have been a Jewish invention. This is written up at Jews, Christianity, Abrahamic and I won't repeat it here, but it is entirely possible Islam was assembled, over a long time, by people who could write, and who wanted to marshal the bands of miscellaneous desert dwellers and traders into a violent unintelligent force, for theft, conquest, and subjugation. Hence the difference in style between Christian and Islamic writings—they were designed for different purposes, like romantic movies vs violent movies. Various Hadiths might be compared to Judaic commentaries and Gospels and Apocrypha—extra writings regarded as supplementing the 'holy' texts, and of course allowing insertion of later updates or changes or policies.

A Jewish motive for inventing and passing off a new religion to Semites would have been to take over what's now Turkey, using allies less clever than Greeks; see the notes above. This of course happened after Mohammed. At the present day, bear this in mind when looking at Russia (hated by Jews) and Islamic invasion.
Here are just a few suggestive comments on 'Islamic Revisionism', modified from a Wikipedia article—
The new [revisionist] movement originated at SOAS, University of London [School of Oriental and African Studies] in 1977 and 1978.   SOAS has a similar origin to the LSE, notorious of course for Jew funding and supremacism.
Islam did not rise among polytheistic pagans in the desert, but ... where Jewish and Christian texts were well-known.
The connection of Muslims and Jews was very close in the early times of Islam. Also Jews were called "believers" and were part of the umma. Antisemitic [sic] texts as e.g. the slaughtering of the Jewish tribe of the Banu Qurayza came into being long after Muhammad when Islam separated from Judaism.

The existence of Muhammad is debated, like the existence of Jesus. Note an important differences between Christianity and Islam: Islam was headed by families, in a way which didn't happen (or wasn't successful, or was not understood, or was national) with Christianity. Here's Jews and Muslims - Very Similar Violent Parasitical Tribal Cults though it was written before I understood the precedence of Jews.



On CHINA and Mongolia and the Far East, note the fact that the Khazar area, on the extreme east of Europe, was along a route to/from China. It may have developed, as another Jewish enclave, to control that route, or as a half-way safe territory, or tax point.

In EUROPE, cities may have been partly under Jewish influence. Jews have a tradition of living in ghettoes in cities, probably a genetic inheritance from millennia of city parasitism. There is a relation between cities and cathedrals; and between smaller towns and parish churches. It's tempting to suggest that Christian parasitism was packaged out—Cathedrals and Bishops in cities providing protection for Jew monopolists; with country land ownership going to the Church, and country-dwellers still thought of as pagans.
    There are astonishing numbers of churches in Europe, and it's possible they absorbed labour, skill, and materials in a similar way to the pyramids, or to modern arms and bases: productivity arranged under the control of elites, which preferred waste and impressiveness to anything useful to ordinary people.
    Are Christians in any way sincere about their beliefs? Briefly, I'd suggest not. There have of course been creeds and Councils; and Heretics. But at times of important change, influence and money trumps beliefs, with The Vicar of Bray as the English exemplar. The Great Schism was regarded at the time as important; but most Catholics have no clue what the points at issue were. During the Reformation in England, almost all the clergy changed sides, apart from a handful of recusants, though Henry VIII's treatment of the Pilgrimage of Grace must have discouraged the others from not converting. During the entire 19th century, the English clergy must have had lives easier than ever before, with guaranteed livings in numerous parishes all around the country. The might have raised questions about Jews; they might have probed into such events as the Opium Wars; but almost all did nothing to help civilisation. They contributed nothing to the understanding of both world wars. They resembled the BBC, but before radio and recordings were invented. Now, they promote immigration, without the slightest understanding of its effects, and they continue to say nothing about wars.
    On Wars, Christendom, since 1914, has been a dead letter, probably because Jews split it very successfully and very disastrously. When Rome, then the Roman Empire, became officially Christian, they fought wars until exhaustion, very likely for the reason the USA has wars now, at the instigation of Jews. Jews switched to Islam, making it very warlike (with peaceful bits—as with Christianity, all options were covered). Muslims became the new model thug armies. The way to examine history since Christianity is to assume it was covertly Jewish, and wars would have been covertly pro-Jew, just like modern wars. Possibly the Vikings et al did not wish to pay a percentage to Jews and/or the Church; certainly they seem to have combined trading with anti-Church violence. People influenced by Victorian historical teaching regard Alfred as uniting England under Roman Catholicism (he learned Latin) and fighting Vikings, seem to forget that 150 years or so later William the Bastard of Normandy was funded for his own Christian invasion. Many people by now realise wars and civil wars with Holland, Spain, England, Ireland, Scotland, France, Russia and endless more cannot be understood without the Jewish covert operations. Wars between Christians (including of course 'wars of religion') have been common enough, though they seem to have not been examined as a separate category, probably because of the difficult issues raised.
[ Back to top of this page ]


VARIATIONS ON THE THEME. JOSEPH ATWILL AND THE ROMAN EMPIRE

Joseph Atwill is the author of 'Caesar's Messiah: The Roman Conspiracy to Invent Jesus' (2005 1st edition). It's described as 'speculative non-fiction'. His other books and broadcast aren't (in my view) very impressive. He seems to have been a journalistic-style author, but his back-up researchers seem weighty enough. I had not heard of him; my personal desktop search reveals nothing. His surname is possibly Jewish; his book may indeed be a diversion from the attribution of fakery to Jews. The following notes I think are more or less correct, though the chronology needs adjustment:–

His work model is that, as far as Jews/Israelites/whatever were concerned, the thirty-plus years assigned to Jesus were wartime, a time of wars with Rome. The Gospels/ Acts and so on were circulated at the end of that period, as though written about forty years earlier, and ignoring war actions. Any prophecies within them could accurately 'predict' such events as a Roman wall around Jerusalem, and destruction of the Temple—they had already happened!
    [Propaganda often ignores wars, however obvious they were to people at the time: Elizabethan England is presented as a merry time, despite a huge war with Spain. The Second World War is presented by propagandists as the 'finest hour', 'good war'].

Copying of symbols and stories (as many anthropologists and others have noted) by Christianity are frequent. The ascension to heaven, the virgin birth, vague ethical ideas, death of a God, are examples. Christian symbols include the anchor, boat, fish, olive branch, and star—and these were symbols on Flavian dynasty coins. Atwill's etymology of 'Christ' is not from the Greek.

Atwill says the Maccabean dynasty was ended by the Herods. And he says the Flavian emperors of Rome replaced the previous dynasty, which ended with Nero. After these replacements, rich and influential families included the Flavians, the Herods and the Alexanders.
    [Atwill seems to accept the blackwashing of Nero, and seems unaware of the possibility that Nero was a reformer, somewhat like Hitler, who was removed and denigrated by the Flavians and their supporters after their coup].

Titus Flavius Vespasianus (son of Vespasian) though emperor for only a few years is central to Atwill's revision. Vespasian had been advertised as a God, Titus therefore being the Son of God. Josephus (renamed Titus Flavius Josephus) wrote his Jewish Wars history, essentially under Roman patronage; how much (if any) is true, is not known to me, but Josephus and the Flavians must have presented a unified view—if they were on good terms.

Atwill uses the word 'typology' to cover stereotyped stories, with sequential passages copied with modifications into a 'new' work, relying on an 'idealised prototype'. A rather clumsy expression. One example is Matthew, which is taken from the Moses story, with about ten sequential parallel passages linked by unimportant material. Or so Atwill maintains. There is of course plenty of scope for linguistic problems, abbreviations and incomprehensible words, puns, jokes, double meanings, and long-disused expressions familiar at the time.
    [Fomenko uses a technique of analysing lengths of reigns to suggest a lot of dynastic history was simply made up to conform to a known, or believed, pattern. And computerised examination of texts and their structures and vocabularies has been tried, I hope with genuine texts.]

[ Back to top of this page ]


Christianity's slow spread in Europe
EXTREME SLOWNESS OF SPREAD OF CHRISTIANITY

Contrary to what most westerners seem to believe, Christianity spread with painful slowness over Europe and Russia, and other areas. Probably it is embarrassing for its acolytes to admit this. And in fact it's even slower than might be imagined, since the conversion or swearing an oath by a leader often failed to penetrate other members of their groups. I'm prompted to insert this note given the endpoint that the last European country to convert nominally was Lithuania in the 14th century!
This map was downloaded, and judging by the typography and other cartographical clues was drawn up in the 1920s or 1930s. Some areas are vague, very likely because borders of countries, and their names and identities, fluctuated widely .

[ Back to top of this page ]


JEWS, CATHOLICS, PROTESTANTS, ARISTOCRACIES

There is still considerable hostility between the various brands of Christianity. As awareness of traditional Jew behaviour expands, there ought to be suspicions or discoveries relating to what after all appears to be just another Jewish propaganda trick. I've selected two specimen bits of writing to illustrate how this process may work itself out. The first is from Miles Mathis's paper, england.pdf
Miles Mathis, June 15th, 2016:
... let us pause to look at Catherine de' Medici. She was Queen of France from 1547 to 1559. Note the first date, and the number 47. King Henry II died in mysterious circumstances in 1559, at age 40. ... [But] that story looks manufactured. ... we find Catherine wouldn't let anyone see the King on his sick bed, so there was no way to confirm this diagnosis or cause of death. All she would have had to do is pay off a doctor. The King [Henry II of France] was more likely poisoned. We have already seen several rumors of poisoning from these families, and it was a common ploy at the time. For more evidence the story is false, we find a strange reaction from Montgomery, who had up to that time been savagely repressing Huguenots in the Scotch Guard: he joined them and waged war against France. I suggest he was chosen as a scapegoat for the King's death and didn't appreciate it. I also suggest that with the murder of his King, he became aware of what the Medici faction was up to: it had just performed a successful coup through the Queen. So Montgomery's war wasn't against France, it was against the Medicis. He should be seen as a hero.

This means the religious wars of that period have been sold to us under a false pretext. We are told it was between the Catholics and the Protestants. But seeing that Paris was ruled by the Jewish Medicis, we see it was a war of the Medicis against the Christian Church more broadly. Catherine ordered the rich Huguenots murdered in the St. Bartholomew's Day massacre not because they were Protestant, but because they were prominent aristocrats and Christian. Also, at Wikipedia we are told

Throughout Europe, it “printed on Protestant minds the indelible conviction that Catholicism was a bloody and treacherous religion”.

That's convenient for the Medicis, right? We see that these religious wars did double duty:
1) getting rid of rich aristocrats whose properties could then be seized,
2) blackwashing Catholicism by making Catholics look like the bad guys. But we have just seen it wasn't really Catholics ordering the Huguenot genocide: it was the Medicis. The history of France has been rewritten by Jewish “scholars”.
And a comment from me, Rerevisionist, 3 Nov 2017 posted to The Occidental Observer's piece on Agobard of Lyon, but disallowed, presumably by a moderator, and not published.
It seems to be impossible to get Catholics, or at least Roman Catholics, to understand that Jews invented the whole fantasy of Jesus etc and then, holohoax-style, repeated their lies for centuries until they managed to insert their invention and get it established as a money-maker. The ‘Reformation’ was largely a Jewish-funded thing; but so was the ‘French Revolution’. Most Roman Catholics don't understand the simplest dynamics of their ‘Faith’ and can't be expected to oppose Jews in any effective way—as of course Jews are perfectly aware as they toy with it. The same sort of comment applies to Protestants too, obviously. You're [someone hoping increase in 'Faith' would go with decrease in Jew influence] trying to build a house, not on sand, but on carefully-compacted rubbish.


[ Back to top of this page ]


THE UNITED NATIONS AS ANOTHER JEWISH POLITICAL RELIGION

This idea occurred to me as I wrote a review of Alex Comfort's Authority and Delinquency (1950; 1970)
Comfort's introduction begins: In 1948 the Beirut conference of UNESCO initiated a large-scale international research team ... on the causes of international and intranational hatreds and tensions. ... [including] a study of the methods by which Fascism was established, and ... the presence of psychopathic or criminal elements in the government of states. ... followed by the inevitable unfocussed discursive comments on research, psychiatry, criminology, and the 'Unesco Tensions Project'.

Note Comfort's assumption that 'Fascism' involved psychopaths or criminals, the omission of Jews, and the conference site, in Lebanon in 1948, where Jews were starting wars—as usual. The UN deserves study; and of course has an intimate connection with Jews—Ashley Montagu, real name Israel Ehrenberg, in effect a founder of 'anti-racialism', being a typical specimen. 'Anti-racialism', obviously something Jews never believed in, was a plank of the UN, in effect part of its new religion, intended to appeal to all races, except perhaps whites and Asians. My reviews include Gunnar Dahlberg and Martin Gardner as just two writers of the 'anti-racialist' dogma; Gunnar Myrdal was another, and Joan Robinson and Richard Dawkins were later.

But as with other religions, Jewish control was never complete, and the equivalents of heretics and reformations and national orthodox variations would be expected.

[ Back to top of this page ]
Click here to e-mail
Updates to this brief version will be added to my articles on Jews, here.
Click for Index to all my general interest items collected in one file
Click for Home page of entire big-lies.org site
© Rae West - First upload 2016-08-17. This version 2016-09-22, but-- Another reprise added 2017-01-07. Consequences and Possibilities added 2017-03-22. Islamic addenda by 1 May 2017. Greek addenda 5 Apr 2017. Khans vs Kaisers 2017-04-20. United Nations note 2017-06-25. Turkey invasion by Seljuks 2017-08-07. China 2017-10-09. Augustine note 2017-10-14. Jew penetration into Europe 2017-11-04

A little-known Welsh saint; the Welsh Bible; a range of Welsh mountains and stonehenge - a new theory about Elvis Aron Presley

© Rae West 1998

Top of this page
big-lies.org

There have been four outstanding mass musical phenomena in the last 50 years or so [i.e. up to 2000]: Frank Sinatra, Elvis Presley, the Beatles, and Michael Jackson. There are still people whose pulses race to the name of Elvis. For them, I present what I believe to be a completely new idea about Presley's name - nothing like it is in Fred Worth and Steve Tamerius's All About Elvis, for example - if it isn't, please let me know. Otherwise, remember you heard it here first! - Rae West

Elvis Presley, Tom Jones: Welsh boyos?     Presley and Jones: Welsh boyos singing together?
Rather blurred detail from 'Tom Jones and Elvis Jamming' Priscilla Presley 'with Sandra Harmon', in 'Elvis and Me', first publication 1985 © Graceland Enterprises


     My idea struck me a couple of years ago, visiting St Davids in south Wales - in what's now the 'Preseli Pembroke district' of south Pembrokeshire, or Dyfed as it's known out of deference to Welsh feeling. Wales (like Cornwall) trails off into the Atlantic, south-westerly, in a granitic Celtic fashion, St Davids ('the smallest cathedral city') being on the top half of the lower of the two sticking-out parts of Wales (got that?), facing southern Ireland.
     A footpath in the area, starting at Solva harbour, passes what looks like an industrialised farm, on a hillside below a burial chamber; an Ordnance Survey guidebook says '.. pass the remains of St Elvis Cromlech, a neolithic burial chamber built around 5,000 years ago. Originally the stones would have been covered by a mound of earth. St Elvis lived in the sixth century and was St David's religious teacher. ...' (OS Map 157, ref 812239). A look at the map shows the farm must be St Elvis' Farm. The burial chamber is a fairly typical small monument - neglected, overgrown, not very large, but with stones hefty enough to have ensured considerable durability.
     Inspired by this information, I looked up a popular booklet on 'St David of Dewisland', by Nona Rees, on sale in the cathedral; she's the daughter of a writer on the Celts. Based mostly on a MS of about 1080, no doubt of immense unreliability, we're told among other things that Aelfyw, also known as Elvis [Latinised form, as David is of Dewi?], a cousin of St David and Bishop of Munster [in Ireland] baptised David. And 'the cult of David extended into south-east Wales and Somerset.. as far afield as Repton in Derbyshire.' As St Elvis doesn't appear in my little Penguin book of saints, it seems he was eclipsed by his more famous relative, and is only locally known.
     So much for Elvis. On Presley, it's notable that the Preseli hills are nearby; the spelling has varied, including for example Prescelly. Incidentally the blue stones of stonehenge are reported, presumably reliably, to have come from here; there's an outcrop, though it has to be said they don't look very blue to a modern eye.
     It's also notable that the area has pleasant shallow harbours - e.g. Whitesands Bay, with 'St Patrick's Chapel' near the waterside, where departures to Ireland were made, at least according to tradition; it seems likely that later emigrations to the colonial United States would have been suggested by this tradition, as, in a similar way, American newspapers circulated in the west of Ireland in the 1920s.
     I suggest that Presley was the son of piously-inclined - at least in theory; Presley's father was jailed for forgery - Welsh-descent people from the Preseli area, who, conceivably out of respect for teaching, christened their son after the more or less legendary 'saint', credited with shaping their patron saint, David.
     I have no idea when Presley's ancestors might have travelled from Wales. Perhaps there's a clue in Benjamin Franklin's Autobiography where Franklin's partner Meredith leaves more or less amicably, 'in or about the year 1729': "I see this [printing] is a business I am not fit for. I was bred a farmer, and it was a folly in me... Many of our Welsh people are going to settle in North Carolina, where land is cheap. I am inclined to go with them.." Carolina is at least in the same sort of area as Tennessee and Mississippi.
     The name 'Aron' presumably is Aaron, 'a teacher, lofty, mountain of strength' according to Cruden's Concordance, which fits nicely. It's not very well known that, early on, but when printing had been properly invented, the Bible was translated into Welsh; there's at least one such vernacular Bible in St Davids Cathedral. So it's possible that 'Aron' is in fact the correct spelling, but in Welsh! Certainly the double-a seems unknown in Welsh (judging by a small dictionary I have). The name given to Elvis' still-born twin, Jesse Garon, perhaps adds a bit of support; Jesse being the father of David, though I haven't been able to find a 'Garon', unless it could possibly be 'Geraint'.
     Furthermore, the Welsh have a tradition of Eisteddfods, community singing, and so on (partly because there was little else to do?) so that perhaps Elvis is an unexpected outcome of this long tradition.
     When I checked, people in the nearby tourist information centre hadn't heard of this idea; so I presume it may be original; anyway, here it is. (Note for the South Wales Tourist Board: 1% of turnover?)

Aug 1999: As an experiment I emailed, and received a reply from, the 'Information Development Officer' of the Welsh Tourist Board. They aren't interested.

Visitor number:


Click here to e-mail

Top of this page
big-lies.org



© Rae West [1998-01-15 this revn 2000-04-19]



‘End Times’ as Jewish Poison of the Mind

Interesting video by Jan Lamprecht:
Jewish Mind Poison - the End Times

Lamprecht focuses on the use of fake predictions, terror, apocalyptic fears, and 'end of the world' terrors in the past. He starts with his own past obsessiveness on prophecies and the supposed wisdom of ancients, Jewish religious stuff, Y2K, Christian prophecies, etc.
    Lamprecht later mentions the (real or supposed) fears around the year 1000 AD. He mentions fear of nuclear war—23 minutes into his video he discusses Cold War fears. (He doesn't seem to have taken on full nuke criticism, as in nukelies.org or I think the AIDS fake.)
    It hadn't occurred to me that instilling 'The End of the World is Nigh' attitude is yet another aspect of Jew propaganda. Lamprecht makes the interesting claim that Jewish 'books' were specifically written as propaganda against nations—not the whole world; certainly not to Americans—to weaken and demoralise and divide them, much like Jewish media today, and in the same way leaflets may be dropped on populations about to be bombed by Jew puppets, and Jews broadcast propaganda lies to rival populations. “Scare propaganda... the poison remains... It's written to be depressing to scare people and freak people out, because these Jews are nation-destroyers [e.g. Book of Daniel, Book of Revelations]... still poisoning the minds of people in the modern age... we've achieved so much, and we sit here cowering in fear...”
Added by Rae West 11 Sept 2017


A Few Comments on Fairy Tales

  • An interesting comment in an American paperback in the early 1970s... Some fairytale characters, notably witches and wizards, have the power to grant wishes, which will then come true. The American author thought this may have something to do with teachers, who arguably can explain to children what to do to change their lives. And it also explains why the witches or wizards cannot grant themselves wishes.
  • ... It also suggests that anyone offered a wish should make the first wish an unlimited number of further wishes.
  • Some fairy tales deal with giants, who emerge from their castles to terrorise the surrounding populations. A little-known Briton, Thomas Spence, author of a periodical called Pig's Meat, suggested this was a reference to Normans in Britain.
  • As far as I remember, the only reference to a fairytale in Bertrand Russell is a remark in Power that powerful people may be more moderate than some revolutionaries predict, 'for fear of killing the goose that lays the golden eggs'.
  • Joseph Needham, the Sinologist, said that fairy tales in China all ended with the beautiful girl marrying a Confucian bureaucrat, rather than a handsome prince.
  • Malcolm Muggeridge's novel Winter in Moscow, an underpowered description of Jews in the USSR, has an unpleasant female character who ignored famine and general deprivation in the correct sense of Russians, but claimed to be interested in fairy stories as a way to explore the soul of Russians.
  • There are plenty of suggestions in The Lord and Language of Schoolchildren that school rhymes, songs, and games echo the past; a typical example is the idea that Ring a Ring o' Roses is a relic of the population drop now described as 'The Black Death'. I found taking the authors seriously a bit difficult when I found they quoted Dr Johnson's Genteel and Ingenious Conversation as thought it were not intended as satire.
  • A strange incident that occurred in the day was Arthur Conan Doyle (author of Sherlock Holmes stories) getting himself gulled into the belief in fairies at the bottom of the garden. Two schoolgirls (this is from memory) snipped out some drawings of fairies from a book, put them in their garden, and took photos, no doubt with some black and white Kodak camera. How this became publicised, I don't know; probably the story isn't widely known. Doyle, rather incredibly, fell for this trick.
  • 'Crying Wolf' has an interest which maybe hasn't been noticed: the default mode is that the little girl is assumed to tell the truth. It's taken fro granted that people usually tell the truth. This of course reflects general attitudes, presumably in most people: it's the reason why most people are baffled by the Jewish media now; they simply can't believe they have been lied to, until some dramatic refutation makes them rethink.
  • Fairy tales and legends and folk songs were presumably first recorded where there were still people living fairly isolated country lives, but also literate people with sufficient leisure to carry out the work. Probably the normal rules of censorship would apply to them.
  • ... to be continued ...



  • Top of this page
    big-lies
    © RW 2013-10-04


    Gobëkli Tepe - Turkish Delight, or Turkey's Archaeological Turkey?

    ©Rae West 7th Feb 2013

    This version slightly updated for spurious film set speculation 2016-09-18, 20

    [ Click for To top of this page
    Click for Home page of entire big-lies.org site ]


    Map of Turkey with Gobleki Tepe
    Map of Turkey, showing Gobëkli Tepe ^. (Çatal Höyük is far to the west, due north of Cyprus)
    Gobleki Tepe Pot Belly Hill
    View of Pot Belly Hill ^

    Gobleki Tepe excavations
    Gobëkli Tepe Excavations at Pot Belly Hill ^
    As soon as I saw this thing ... I thought it looks like a fake. Note the location, on the border of Turkey with Syria; and the high elevation of the land; and the confusion in the site of round areas and rectangular areas. I'd suggest this may have been built as a foundation for a mosque, on commanding high ground, perhaps as a threatening anti-Christian monument. Conceivably it might have been intended as a mass grave. Maybe it was built under the pretence of being a film set; perhaps it was—maybe a 1960s film includes it. The T-shaped stones suggest deliberate fakery to me; the iconography is confused and I'd suggest possibly the skills of forgers were used—since the rediscovery of the past, fakes have been manufactured, sometimes in large numbers. The stones—assuming they are stone, and not some sort of modern composite—may have been placed into foundations of a badly-planned mosque; perhaps some far-sighted local European-educated Turk, impressed by the attention given to Tutankhamun and other excavational successes, tried his hand at architecture, but gave up and positioned these things, then covered them up. There are photo(s) of a bemused elderly local in his red headgear (sometimes compared to a tea towel...) with the claim he'd farmed the site, translated as 'Pot Belly Hill', all his life. Maybe. I'd date this site about 1920, personally. But I could be wrong.     Another possibility: Çatal Höyük (an archaeological site, not a person—Googling catal huyuk will find it) became famous world-wide from about 1960—Mohenjo Daro in what's now Pakistan was media-promoted beforehand—and may have suggested—particularly to an envious, cunning mind—or perhaps a shrewd mind, one that noticed the gullibilities and animosities between official experts and hangers-on—that another site could be conjured up. If so, a cover story may have been needed: perhaps a Hollywood set? All that would be needed would be a year or so to cut the stones, decorate them, and instal them by crane, then fill in with rubble to crudely suggest seating etc. Finally, the Hollywood film could be said to have been cancelled, and the whole thing covered, with some thought to making it seem old, but not too hard to rediscover. Evidence in the quarry would need to be removed—paper scribbles giving the rough heights and dimensions could not be left lying around.

    If I'm right, I'd guess this is the first large-scale archaeological fake.

    People new to the subject of fakes (especially where there's a huge financial incentive, as with e.g. Greece and Italy in the 'grand tour' era, and modern Chinese faked fossils) might like my review of Mark Jones: Fake? Art of Deception published by the British Museum Press.

    Wikipedia is of course a notorious source of bullshit. Here's what they claim for the Gobekli Tepe site. Note that the site is nine miles (not a huge distance) from a long-established significant town close enough for truckloads of building material.
    Gobekli Tepe Wikipedia entry

    National Geographic is a rather longer-established source of bullshit. Here's what they claim. Remember the National Geographic went along with the NASA moon landing fraud (see 1969 issues, and a few later years) and other frauds, e.g. a supposedly newly-discovered tribe. Quite apart from pseudoscientific articles for example on biology. And numerous political scams.

    view of Gobekli Tepe site - a hoax?

    Gobekli Tepe upright stone hoax? Gobekli Tepe - hoax carving?
    Note the highly unconvincing aspects of these photos.
    • The stone uprights are T-shaped, suggesting they were designed for placement by cranes or at least ropes.
    • The uprights are narrow, suggesting mass produced cutting with modern equipment.
    • There's an absurd contrast between the finish of the stones and the surrounding area, both floors and walls being non-existent or badly-finished.
    • Note the variety of iconography, some worn, suggesting amateur attempts to simulate ancient artefacts, some well-finished, some with modern motifs such as the straining arms and hands.
    • The irregularity and poor arrangement of the uprights
    The avoidance of information: where would the stone have been quarried? Geological identification of stone is excellent. How can they be sure of the date, since there are no strata even remotely able to be dated?
    Gobekli Tepe site - a hoax? Gobekli Tepe - is it a hoax?
    [I've noticed a rather sad website http://www.unexplained-mysteries.com has some unintelligent comments on this short piece. It looks like a typical Jew-controlled junk site, of the sort Americans don't have the wit to challenge. Perhaps some day the level of intelligence in the USA will rise, and trash will become rarer. Let's hope so.]

    Click here to e-mail
    To top of this page
    Click for To top of this page
    Click for Home page of entire big-lies.org site
    HTML Rae West - First upload 7th Feb 2013 (GMT)


    Genuine graffiti. © Rae West
    WARNING! Nasty language (not by me!) 15th May 2000

        big-lies.org     Top of this page     E-mail me

    Rae West's graffiti
    © Rae West 2000. "A magnificent commentary on recent modern history"—Prof. Richard Evans, official expert, Cambridge University, UK.
    EUROPE 1973 Nixon's father should have pulled out 63 years ago. Power borns from the barrel of a gunBefore judging the US, maybe you ought to go there all those people may not be wrong
      Eat shit - one billion flies can't be wrong
    Jean-Paul Sartre is a fartre The only good tory is a lava-toryNo politics! Just filth, please!
    I think, therefore I am. - I don't think, therefore I am not
    I thought Phuc Yu was a village in Vietnam
    LONDON UNDERGROUND 1977-1990We are fed up with fucking tourists in London.
      — A. Londoner.
    TRY FUCKING THEM SOMEWHERE ELSE THEN
    This earth will self-destruct in 5 - 10 years.Tourists, We'd rather not have to stand on the tubes, buses and streets while you decide where to spend your money. Why don't you go home? London's not that great anyway! bottoms are for spanking bottoms are for spanking bottoms are for spanking Don't write this shit
    [on top of Arabic script graffiti]
    Why worship God the father is cruel because he is Moslim Why accept this shit? Your life is so empty
    [on ad. for women]
    HAPPY BIRTHDAY LORD JESUS CHRIST ANNY YOU'RE SO PHY-SI-CAL. TROTSKY WAS RIGHT
      GO AND LIVE IN BLOODY RUSSIA THEN.
    We had Joy we had fun we had arsenal on the run
      But the fun could not last so we kicked them on the arse.
      by a Spurs supporter.
    Far away is close at hand in images of elsewhere
    Endel White looks like Bryan Ferry. Cor! THIS EXPLOITS WOMEN Commuters eat baked beansSarah H. Makes your morning.

    Sarah H. Makes your day.

    Two degrees in be-bop
      A Ph.D. in swing
    He's a master of rhythm
      He's a rock'n'roll king.
    Eat proper at the COMMUNITY CAFÉ jus around the corner. Hefty Lefty CFC VAMBO rools
    ShananaIt's frothy, man!Wayne and Nicky went to Arsenal v Forest in the cup and killed them Northern cuntsBLUE SCREVMING PEGASUSJ.A.M. woz ere on a shit sat night PS (we lost a party) PPS (we never found it)RASICM
    WAX SAGS
    David Bowie rules for Sue always if you have had an intuitive experience, then you are telepathic search the washerwoman and the greasemonkey [I couldn't find a cyrillic font...] Blow your mind - smoke gunpowder some men go for women, some men go for boys black and white yes. Jews no. Users just for money. what about a rebate for the poor? - your joking
    this caridge belongs to the Lords. Yeh man. money talks, people mumble Antigone woz ear 31-1-79Rae West graffitiWomen reclaim the nightShall I rape the
    virgin wall
    Paul Tizer is a scientific bastard on his skateboard
    Pop rivets are fun Keep on the grassThere are people living behind this self-imposed prison
    [on corrugated iron fence]
    GLC intrigue reaches all-time high
    End human sacrifice. Don't get married. Give the Kurds their WheyNAPALM
    DEATH

    Dung
    Mountain

    Electro
    Hippie

    Sore
    Throat

    ATLANTA GEORGIA 1980 If it wasn't for us dicks, you cocksuckers would be out of business The world's a rock and we are little pebbles. That's why we get stoned. Wango tango Baby! O=Asshole
    social security. designed to keep you poor but alive 'Ulster says no'
    -but the man from Del Monte says yes
    Spagnoli is queer You call that a cock. I call it a pee pee I don't hold a grudge - I get even Don't smoke Bebop a Lula
    Be my baby
    Bebop a Lula
    don't mean maybe....
    Roll Tide!!
    around the BOWL
    and down the HOLE
    ROLL TIDE ROLL
    ELIJAH MOHAMMED
    PORCH MONKEY
    Bullitan Board.
    Facts for the Fags
    Suck my 12 gauge shotgun, queer.
    Suck my 44 Magnum motherfucking faggot
    1
    -ASSIGNMENT-
    The next time someone
    asks you about Football,
    reply with a Non-Sequitur.

    2
    -ASSIGNMENT-
    Define Non-Sequitur.
    Use it in a Sentence.

    3
    -ASSIGNMENT-
    Describe your position in
    Society. State the Criteria
    by which you evaluate
    your position.
      Rate your importance
    in your society on a
    scale of 1 to 10.

    Come and give me a little kiss. I'm Puerto Rican, maybe I'll teach you a little SpanishDue to bizzare
    & ridiculous
    circumstances beyond our control
    <= Our Parking Lot
    * and thus (OUR LIVING)
    is being replaced
    by TREES! (called progress)
    If you can piss above this line
    ———
    the Atlanta fire dept wants you
    T
    A
    U
    N
    T
    O
    N

    M
    A

    There is some primo acid going around - white microdot - 300 ug!!Gay?
    Meet in 3rd Floor Student Ctr
    Mens Room M-F
    6.30 - 8.30
    Sa-Su 1-3.
    Come meet your friends!
    ZED LEPPLIN #1
    Hell, yeah!
    pi/4 = 1 slice
    Be nice to fairies - my little brother is one! Cocaine
    adds
    life
    Q. Why did the Polok trade his wife in for an outhouse?
    A. The hole was smaller and it didn't smell as bad
    I DonT Believe He would Like to have his name scribbled On bathroom walls
      Do you know where you would spend eternity if you were to die today? You had better consider it, because you wont have the opportunity once you have died. check Jesus out. He's the only real thing.
      6 feet underground like everyone else.
      tell me that when you stand at the white throne of judgement
      Does that have anything to do with the throne I just got up off of?
      Shut up
      Keep it up. We'll see how long you laugh!!
      I've already laughed longer and harder than you know how, Christian hypocrite.
    Would you fight for America? Why/Why not?

    Yes, but only if America was invaded.
    I'd fight - all the way to Earran
    No fucking way - I'd rather be a live coward than a dead one.
    Any time, day or night.

    grafitti, grafitti, grafiti, or graffitti?
    THE INTERESTING THING ABOUT LIFE
    IS THAT YOU CAN'T LIVE WITHOUT IT.
    What's green and carries a medical Bag?
    give up?
        Mucous Welby
    Get it
    FUCK, SUCK, BE FUCKED This graffiti sux
    -amen
    - Fuck all the EE fagots in this school.
    - That's what they want
    CC***** LIVES! In this stallAbolish
    Collegiate
    Football
    for
    Tech's
    Sake
    THANK ---- FOR DRUGS!
    It's up to you
    AYATOLLAH
    ASSATOLLA
    most nuclear power stations are built better than Jane Fonda.Have you ever been to electric ladyland?
      -Yes, it was the shock of my life!
    Reality is only a concept.
      ACID clears up any misconceptions.
    {man} (= {animals}

    What is the difference between a man and an animal?
    THE DIFFERENCE IS THAT A MAN CAN THINK AND AN ANIMAL CAN NOT.
    So, Why Americans do not think?
    BECAUSE THEY ARE LIKE ANIMALS.

    Is Dr. [Surname] dead?
    No - He just smells that way
    No - He just looks thAt wAy
    No - He just acts that way
      — Conclusion: he probably is that way!
    before 1941 the prevailing attitude in this country was of ISOLATIONISM. Since then we have grown steadily WEAKER till now a pipsqueak country like IRAN can push us around. Isn't it time we stopped minding other people's business and took care of our own?

      Hell, yeah!

    If you hate Housing make an "X"
    XXX"X"

    Hate is too nice a word
    Housing sux
    THERE IS NOT EVEN ENOUGH TO GO AROUND
    - SOUNDS LIKE THE WOMEN
    - I GOT MY SHARE

    I work for housing + get my choice of housing,so Screw all of you SAPS!! Ha!

    This person is an ASSHOLE!

    My dick is curved
    If you dont like America and Americans what iN the hell are you doiNg over heRe. what I Guess it just tells us you thiNk of YOUR COUNTRY!
      YOU FOREIGN FUCK UP
    Here I sit my buns a flexin'
    Bout to birth another
    Amerikin-hating Turkey!
    Go home to yo' mama, boah!
    If binary digits are bits,
    Then decimal ones could be dits,
    And when things get weary,
    Try something less dreary,
    Like playing with trinary tits.
    Strike a blow for freedom
    Buy US Bombs
    and get HIGH!
    IF YOU CAN'T MAKE YOUR VIEWPOINTS ANY WIDER THAN THIS, THE HONKY ESTABLISHMENT NEEDS YOUGive pot a chance!

    Give peace a chance!

    GIVE NIXON A CHANCE

    Shit! Give piss a chance

    Drop acid - on your balls
    Frat
    Fags
    Suck
    Nigger
    Dicks

    Iran
    sucks
    desert
    donkey
    dicks

    Vote Jimmy for farm hand
    its his first love
    J.B. STOWER
    FOR
    PRESIDENT
    OF
    U.S.A.

    nigger lover

    jealousy
    the bigot's choice

    A HOLIDAY THOUGHT

    IF MILES STANDISH WOULD HAVE SHOT A CAT INSTEAD OF A TURKEY WE COULD ALL EAT PUSSY FOR THANKSGIVING

    Why do Iranians stink?
    - so blind people can hate them too!
    If black is beautiful
    I just did something beautiful
    To hell with Georgia Tech - and they'll design a way to get out
    NATIONAL GALLERY, LONDONA SELF-CONFESSED HOMMOSEXUAL
    BISEXUAL
    TRANSEXUAL
    INCESTUAL
    Cunt
    GO TO
    ART SCHOOL
    YOU POOF

    GROW UP YOU
    IMMATURE DICK

    NORTH LONDON POLY, 1982Beware! White man exploits other races, and their natural resources.

    -Capitalism is an invention of honkies to suit their needs
    -And communism is also our invention, to suit yours!

    -Thanks RUSSIAN COMRADES FOR HElPING OUR PEOPLE'S Libertion and the BUILDING OF A NEW AND BETTER SOCIETY Without Discriminations
      -AgFHGAN PEOPLE (DEC'D)

    -BULLSHIT YOU BRAINWASHED COMMIE ZOMBIE

    UDA
    Quis sederabit.
    We'll not be mastered
    By no Catholic bastard
    Rae West graffiti Is incest the theory of relativity? Pythagoras is the root of all evil
    I fuck God's wife
      I know everything (signed) GOD
    Vote broad left - Cuts, unopposed quotas implemented, high hall rents (and crap gigs) and no nurseries.Imagination is juxtoposition to the cosmic & thus... Out there in the windy desert of my mind there are no oases. BRUNEL UNIVERSITY 1990-94 Redecoration is censorshipI've got this problem, I've got too many ladies
    <- you're problem is you're alone,
    <- still, not insurmountable, is it?
    OI!
    Why look up? Embarrassed about it?

    No, I'm trying to look over it

    Beergut problems too much?

    The prove of a prophet is his miraculous powers...

    Mohammed used to fuck prostitutes

    Why did the Walrus go to the Tupperware party?

    He wanted to find a tight seal

    How do you know your sister's on?
    A When your dad's dick tastes funny

    Q What's the best thing about having sex with a 10 year old?
    A You can pretend she's 5

    Q What's the best thing about having sex with a 5 year old?
    A When you hear her pelvis snap!

    Q What's the downside to having sex with a 10 year old?
    A When she tells you she's had better

    Q What's the downside to eating a bald pussy?
    A Putting the nappy back on

    Mohammed fucked his mistresses and made them cover themselves up so he could take them to Mecca.

      That's why he was bound for Mecca and that's why Paki women have to cover up their faces!

    Oedipus was a goddam motherfucker Where's the fuck'n graffiti?Q What do you call a UCL student?

    A A stuck up middle-class mummy's boy

    I think wallpaper would be nice next time! Vote Kane [1]
    -No Bullshit Hall [1]
    What's blue and fucks grannies?
    Hypothermia
    What do you call a woman with no legs? - Dirty cunt
    BRITISH MUSEUM 1989-1992Wogs out of white woman's cunt
    -or, as Mrs Thatcher put it, 'what people are afraid of is being swamped'. Remember that if you consider voting for her, affluent Asians, W Indians and other welcome immigrants
    Remember Stalingrad
    -Who's he?
    -What did he grad in?
    -What for?
    - Killing lots of Nazis a not insignificant achievement and an entirely laudable one
    Thatcherite SONDERABORT-SCHRIFTABTEILUNGEN are seeking art-loving British Library readers. Don't make their task too easy Fuck British Telecom and get a drum

    - You seem quite upset

    Immigrants have forced the wage of the working class down and delayed efficiency in the economy

    -blame the capitalist state not the immigrants

    Who wants to spank me
    - No thanks I'm not into gerontophilia
    - Delighted make a date
    - A cane is better
    - Both you wankers need 6 of the best
    - Unusual types use this place, don't they
    - They certainly do, Olly
    POUFF BOY COL WAS ERE

    MORON STRAIGHT GIT WOZ 'ERE

    Vulgarism or MongolismKinnock.. Nazi

    - NAZI?

    LAZY
    HAZY

    Rejoice in the beauty of the male body
    - Priapus Rules OK
    CONWAY HALL 1995"To be is to be the value of a bound variable" - N V O Quine
    "Do be Do be Do" - Frank Sinatra
    Rae West graffiti big-lies
    SUPPORT/ PAC!/ PLO!/ IRA!/ BCM!/ ANC!
    Musical maestros have come and gone
      From Yoko through to the young Lennon
    Hendrix, though, is here to stay
      And acid means it'll stay that way
    What Morrison said to Hendrix was "D'ya wanna blow job, ace"
      You see, they were friends
    Luck is an attitude
    Luck is good use of energy
    What self-indulgent/ confusing/ aware/ selfish/ selfless grafitti! o
    THE POLITICS OF CLASS WAR-
    EVERYBODY ELSE IS WRONG

    THEY'RE RIGHT
    WITHOUT RADICAL ACTION & CLASS UNITY WE'LL GET NOWHERE
    (END OF THE DISCUSSION)

    DON'T TALK ABOUT IT, DO IT!
    NOW!!

    NO, GOVERMEnT CANT DISSOLVe PROBLEMS THEy CREATE THEMSELVES

    SEARCHLIGHT
    =
    M.I.5
    KILL GAYS

    Why. You probably are one.
    Really, I mean is that the real you talking? Or just your FEAR?

    No, it's me, GAY SCUM MAN

    (Oh no it's a queer
    Quick before he tries to bugger me)

    Fuck off

    Red, White & Blue

    If you're not outraged you're not paying attention 1/3 of the world are or have been squatters
    - in this bog!
    Class War is canceled!

    Teacher is ill!

    BEDFORD COLLEGE 1991 Anarchy is not chaosHot sexy little dormice
    Free the Renault 5
    GLASTONBURY 1994YOU ARE THE FRAGMENT OF A MUCH GREATER ENTITY BUT INDEPENDANT OF IT.

    YOU CREATE FRAGMENTS TO!

    PEACE
    & ONELOVE
    23 B.C.
    THERE IS NO NEED TO LOOK FOR THE SOUL
    THERE IS NOTHING TO FIND, IT WAS NEVER LOST
    The Glastonbury Experience
    is a Capitalist One.

    Still.

    POSSESSED BY AN ASTAL ALIEN T.B.F.
    schit on tha rest
    DIJOSJELO!
    FOOD GOES IN
    SHIT COMES OUT
    STRANGE WATERS
    COME FROM MO SPOUT!
      - HENKE AGE 4 1/2
    NO MORE ROADS, PLEASE!
    I CAN'T BREATH!
    AND MY FURRY/ FEATHERY
    FRIENDS ARE TIE DYEING!
    PROTEST NOW!
    GET YOUR ARSES IN GEAR BEFORE IT'S ALL GONE —> SORRY
    If Jesus Saves - He's well behind with the payments!
    Newcastle Jim
    When freedom is outlawed

    Only the outlaws will be free.

    Miles does crap parties.

    Not only does he do crap parties but he's a horrible person as well.

    Today's hippy is tomorrow's tramp,
    & tomorrow's tramp is our future.
    You think you have problems,
    Spare a thought for Gaia

    "I'll say a little prayer for her"

    Grafiti, graffiti, graffitti - no. Grafitti!
    HTML Rae West. All graffiti genuine and unedited. ©Rae West. WARNING! Some nasty language
    Top of this page     big-lies.org     E-mail
    15th May 2000
    Feel free to link to any part of my site


    Jokes about Lawyers: Cartoon about money, classical quotations, and links

    Jokes about Lawyers

    Assembled by Richard Ennals & Rae West 1998

    Joke from Punch, 1920s.

    LAWYER: "Well, to defend you I shall want money. Have you any?"
    CLIENT: "Oh, yus—plenty."
    LAWYER: "Splendid. Now, what do they accuse you of stealing?"
    CLIENT: "Oh—money."

     
    "Wrong must not win by technicalities" - Aeschylus (c 460 BC)

    "If you do not have the basis for an argument, abuse the plaintiff" - Cicero

    "In law, what plea so tainted and corrupt, But, being seasoned with a gracious voice, Obscures the show of evil?" - Merchant of Venice

    "The law of England is the greatest grievance of the nation, very expensive and dilatory" - Bishop Gilbert Burnet (1723)

    "Let the laws be clear, uniform, and precise; to interpret laws is almost always to corrupt them" - Voltaire

    "God works wonders now and then: Behold! a lawyer, an honest man!" - Benjamin Franklin

    "If there were no bad people there would be no good lawyers" - Charles Dickens

    "The law is the witness and external deposit of our moral life. Its history is the history of the moral development of the race" - Oliver Wendell Holmes

    "The law courts of England are open to all men, like the doors of the Ritz Hotel" - Lord Justice Darling (1920)

    "Her husband is a lawyer; and an honest man" - "Bigamist!" - Punch (1920s)

    "An unjust law is itself a species of violence. Arrest for its breach is more so" - Gandhi


    Click below for more lawyer jokes websites.
    Update, 2013: Of seven sites with jokes about lawyers, only one survives at


        1995 homepage with series of jokes and an ad


    Email me
    Top of this page
    big-lies.org

    ©Rae West 1998-05-22 Revd 1998-10-27, 1999-09-30



    Leys (or 'Ley Lines') and Alfred Watkins as a Pioneer


    Watkins Old Straight Track Notes on what might be a serious discovery, a reshaping of perceptions of the remote past.

    This is a combination of three book reviews (from elsewhere on this site; also on Amazon): two of books by Alfred Watkins, The Old Straight Track (1925) and The Ley Hunter's Manual (1927). And a biography of Watkins by Ron Shoesmith. I've added very detailed notes following the reviews which I hope are clear and accurate. The Old Straight Track was a pioneering book, presenting a rational theory of prehistoric landscape awareness and mobility. But the book has been, and still is, misrepresented by both supporters and opponents.

    The Old Straight Track
    Fascinating if over-detailed book (Watkins' 'The Ley Hunter's Manual' is I think better). Poor Watkins is misrepresented by both friends and enemies—the latter mostly professional archaeologists.

    Trying to summarise: Watkins realised (he was among other things a commercial traveller around Herefordshire, and was well aware of the problems of finding one's way round, and the importance of landmarks) that prehistoric man had a problem of transport. To take one example: salt. There are local deposits of this in Britain; but projecting time backwards, how could the stuff be moved around? There were no motorways, or even roads; no tarmac; no motor traffic; no bikes; no maps; not even weedkiller to keep paths clear... obvious points which many people seem unable to grasp.

    Watkins' theory was simply that straight tracks were laid out by line-of-sight and marked by whatever method was feasible—dug-out notches on the skyline (early man could do earthmoving on quite a scale), upright stones arranged in pairs to point the way, perhaps church steeples (assuming site continuity), large stones by the pathside—of types not found locally, to remove doubt. Watkins thought some large flat stones marked with cup and ball marks might be in effect maps of local 'hill forts'. He thought Silbury Hill was built specifically as a landmark. Trees were another possibility, though obviously they would be visible now, if at all, only by traces.

    Another of Watkins's examples was water: springs of clean water were presumably a useful asset (and some contained health assisting minerals, though obviously we're in eras predating chemical knowledge). Paths to them might be marked out.

    And much more in this vein, including signalling by means of beacon fires.

    His SUPPORTERS have often taken a description by Watkins of a sudden insight into this possibility ('wires.. across the countryside') in an electrical sense, adding a whole assemblage of material on sacred sites, lights, currents, electric charges and shocks, and what have you. And of course there was a temptation to rule lines on the then-new Ordnance Survey maps. They also renamed as 'ley lines' what Watkins christened 'leys'.

    His OPPONENTS generally laid into the detail—place-names for example obviously are a high-risk source of evidence. So are buildings—many 19th century churches are built in mock-old styles, many manor houses aren't reliable indicators of archaeological precedents, etc.

    I think there was also a class element here: archaeologists like, or liked, to look at palaces, villas, military structures, cathedrals, massive megaliths, impressive graves, treasure hoards, and generally high status things. Watkins tried to redirect attention to humble practical tracks and paths.

    The Ley Hunter's Manual
    Brilliant book, amplifying Watkins' 1921 discovery. Full of speculative details.

    Watkins' view of the remote past is: Man in hunting phase: salt, flint only to be obtained from afar. He'd ascend a hill, seek farthest peak 'in the direction he wanted to go.' Two staves were the first surveyors instruments: cairns, stones etc. were markers.

    [Later note: the then-rather-new detailed ordnance survey maps of Britain allowed hypotheses to be checked, up to a point, without an enormous amount of field work trying to rediscover lost tracks. I suspect Watkins may have travelled on horseback, which may have made travelling away from roads easier for him. Pp 81 and 83 mention two leys, specifically decribed as short or 'Little'; the latter is eleven miles long. Conversely, the effort and difficulty involved must have put off many archaeologists from investigating. Note that a lot of his suggestions are still omitted by people who wish to stress mystery, the unsolved problems, etc. There isn't always hostility between official archaeologists and ley line enthusiasts: Chippindale of Cambridge and Devereaux for example were on good terms.]

    Ron Shoesmith's biography Alfred Watkins: A Herefordshire Man provides a verbal portrait along these lines:-

    Watkins is under-rated, mainly because he devised a new idea which academics hated, though they weren't very successful in opposing him. At least one book was written purely as an attempt at refutation.

    Watkins invented the idea of 'leys', *not* 'ley lines'. The idea was that lines of sight were important; in times before maps, roads, and big towns, not to mention sat navs and signposts. He invented the engaging idea that trading routes had to go long distances, and of course it was important not to get lost en route—not an easy trick when paper and ink, tarmac, road rollers, stone moving equipment, and weedkillers barely existed. Stone markers in lines, the 'gwlch'—a scooped-away path visible on the horizon—beacons, burial and other mounds—including Silbury Hill—and generally things exploiting the straight line aspect of light were in his view arranged and designed as early straight-line tracks.

    I suspect much of this was thought up by Watkins as he travelled around Wales selling and promoting some of his business ideas. (He was—inter alia—an early photographer, processing his own glass plates with their silver halide emulsions, and who patented his own exposure meter. His books are illustrated with his own black and white photographs of stone monuments, church spires as possible alignment markers, paths with suggestive directional features, stones with cup and ball marks, and similar details). He appears as a man in a respectable suit, middle-aged, solemn and serious, surveying the world through spectacles. He founded a club and his ideas led to enthusiasts with maps and rulers trying to find networks of lines in a probably unrealistic fashion. I would guess more attention will be devoted to him in time—not many people can invent a new way to picture the world. I think he may have influenced Belloc, who also wrote on trackways, though mainly to do with pilgrims' routes. I suspect Tolkien had some knowledge of his books, too; 'the road goes ever ever on'. I suspect also that Trevelyan of the Youth Hostels Association and other walkers and ramblers might have liked the idea of healthy outdoor exercise with unprofessional research into the past. Watkins extended his ideas abroad, even including stupas in India as perhaps markers, and ideas from National Socialist Germany, and even the lines at Nazco.

    This biography however, though affectionate, is a bit short. It isn't very detailed, but so far as I know is the only one available as a mass-market book.

    Shoesmith was (perhaps is?) Hereford City Archaeologist; his book was first published in 1990.

    Very Much More Detailed Notes on Alfred Watkins and Leys.

    [1] Historical Overview.
    The population migrations, or cultural changes, in British prehistory are believed to include 'ancient Britons' and Celts, in whatever sequence, then Romans, then Angles/Saxons/Jutes, then Normans. Each had their own languages and beliefs, and must have left some traces, but of course these are difficult to disentangle. We're looking at times when calendars were imprecise, but we can be all but certain that the days, seasons, years, animals, plants and climate resembled today's, apart from known importations. There may be linguistic clues, and Watkins was familiar with Welsh, which is related to such languages as Cornish (more or less extinct), and Breton. There may be clues in ancient writings, if these ever existed, and if they survived; and there may be tales, stories, myths which possibly encapsulate genuine events. Physical survivals from the past may include place-names, re-used sites of building, re-used paths, re-used mounds and earthworks and monuments; additionally professional archaeologists uncover evidence, often not easy to interpret. We also have potential DNA discoveries, air investigations, ground-penetrating radar, international comparisons, mostly since Watkins' time.

    Obviously there are endless complications. Archaeological remains may be difficult to interpret. Place-names might simply be reworked in a convenient form: 'Avon' means river in Welsh ('Arfon'), we call what sounds like 'Paree' Paris, and presumably place-names which sound Germanic might have been recognisable to earlier linguistic groups. Short names in particular can cause confusion between languages—they may resemble words of totally different meaning, or may resemble opposite meanings. Watkins has a set of examples around the words coel, coel, gole: Welsh 'coel' from gole may mean light, splendour, and coal may therefore have been named after its flame. 'Black' in Anglo-Saxon meant pale, or shining; in Slav languages black means blessed, or light giving. So black man, dodman, cole man, weyman are all possibly etymological track makers. Watkins discusses the confusions around 'black as coal' and 'perefectly balc' at some length. Another problem is trying to interpret site continuity: it may or may not be real: high points, spires, mounds, buildings may have originally had a line-of-sight significance, or may not.

    There are plenty of possible points of landscape significance. Let's see which ones Watkins noticed.

    [2] Thirty chapter headings in The Old Straight Track in sequence, grouped by myself to try to clarify Watkins' intentions:-
    MOUNDS/ ALIGNMENT OF MOUNDS/ LEYS IN RADNOR VALE - Intro on high viewpoints
    MARK STONES - Idea of big stones as once-recognised markers
    THE SIGHTED TRACK/ WATER SIGHT POINTS/ SIGHT NOTCHES - Idea of linked viewpoints on low-lying tracks
    INITIAL POINTS/ MARK TREES/ CAMPS - More on objects along trackways
    LEY-MEN/ SIGHTING STAFF/ TRADERS' TRACKS - How lines may have been surveyed and set up
    SUN ALIGNMENT/ BEACONS/ CHURCHES ON MARK-POINTS/ ORIENTATION - Light as an aid to finding the way
    CASTLES ON MARK-SITES/ ASSEMBLIES AT MARK-POINTS - Includes stone circles as likely meeting-places
    ROMAN ERA/ PLACE-NAMES/ FOLK-LORE/ HERMES AND HERMIT/ IN OTHER LANDS/ BIBLE RECORD - Traditions of leys perhaps included in old literature
    CONFIRMATION/ OBSCURITIES AND OBJECTIONS/ CHRONOLOGY/ ALPHA AND OMEGA - Watkins' overview of his idea
    AN OUTLINE - Summary

    [3] Some Examples of Watkins' Use of Multiple Sources and Types of Evidence
    MOUNDS/ ALIGNMENT OF MOUNDS/ LEYS IN RADNOR VALE - Intro on high viewpoints
        On mounds, Watkins considers that Silbury Hill (in what's now Wiltshire, near stonehenge and Avebury) was a landmark: it 'could not have been seen over an adjacent bank if it had been lower' (p. 24). He considered that mounds were positioned, not on top, but to be visible from the valley; i.e. built in a position tangential to the line of sight from the valley. He claimed mounds in valleys often had a ditch around, a halo of light, to make them stand out. Mounds could be locations for 'folk moots', local government, law courts in the open air, executions, amusements, fairs, markets. Watkins lists Hill place names, not found near hills, but in alignment with them (p 64)
        A 'barrow' may be etymologically related to earth-moving equipment. Watkins gives Skep, Hod, Kiver, Kipper, Barrow as equivalents. Note that 'borough' and 'barrow' may have the same root.
    MARK STONES - Idea of big stones as once-recognised markers
        Mark-stones: Size varies from a couple of feet to 22 feet high (p. 26). The size must have been heavy enough to discourage casual theft or shifting. Watkins cites folk memory of giants dropping such stones.
        Stones marked with cup-hollows may be maps showing lines and 'hillforts'. Dr Graves, Bishop of Limerick, believed this.
    THE SIGHTED TRACK/ WATER SIGHT POINTS/ SIGHT NOTCHES - Idea of linked viewpoints on low-lying tracks
        Water-sighting discussed on page 31. Watkins mentions lake dwellers, living in settlements on stilts in lakes, something found at the time by archaeologists (they appear in H G Wells's Outline of History). A period of history that's 'almost untouched'. Watkins is keen on water sighting features, and uses evidence which is hard to assess, such as a small pond being called a 'flash', and fords (p. 37), and real or supposed stone causeways through prehistoric ponds.
        Sky notches: ;as a rule show from one side only' (p 26). Place-names noted by Watkins include bwlch, gap, crack, nick, and scar.
    INITIAL POINTS/ MARK TREES/ CAMPS - More on objects along trackways
        Initial Points (p 34). Trees (p 35): the Scots pine, the only native pine, may have been used as a marker, and this may survive in place names e.g. Gospel Oak, Cold Elm. Obviously, Watkins was aware that evidence from trees must be hard to find.
        Watkins renames what are usually called 'hillforts' (or 'castles' as in Maiden Castle) as Camps. He says (page 37) that camps were 'made in the later days of the old track ... [there is] no evidence they were built for any other purpose than a peaceful enclosure for peoples or herds...' They may, says Watkins, include an older sighting mound, or have straight edges aligned with leys.

    Thus Watkins on the general appearance of leys. How were they surveyed and made?

    LEY-MEN/ SIGHTING STAFF/ TRADERS' TRACKS - How lines may have been surveyed and set up
    Wilmington long manWatkins considers track directions would be surveyed using upright rods, to prolong straight lines out of sight of their landmarks. As supporting evidence he notes the Wilmington Long Man (see photo), and a similar man with staves at Lake Onega, Russia. (This latter may not have survived the mass murders by Jews; I have yet to see an image of it).
        Watkins mentions a reference in Dickens, to a snail, nicknamed the 'dodman'; considering a snail's two 'horns' resemble two staffs used by his surveyors. The Welsh word dodi means to place, set, or plant; it may be related to dodge, doddering, north of England dod, and place names with dod. Be this as it may, Watkins gives a list of specific tracks, related to specific activities. These may (or may not - I don't know) predate horses in Britain. Here they are....
    SPECIAL TRACKS:
    - Just some notes from Watkins. I'm not aware that Watkins used geological maps (Britain was a pioneer in the production of these) though they would seem relevant when considering the distribution of flint, clay pots, salt and no doubt other things.
          Salt p61: Salt producing towns or areas end in wych./ Variation from -wick, to wyke, wych, week, not from Latin vicus, village./ Another, perhaps earlier, is white, whit, or wit. Whiteways, Whitman etc [Whitsun? - RW]/ Roads are called saltways or salters way as in Salford, Saltridge, Saltbox
          Flint chips p 62: chip, chap, cheap, chop, eg trading towns like Chipping Norton, trading streets like Cheapside/ Chapman trader/ Chepstow, Chipstead from trader/ Also knap, knapper/ 'Barrows often trading places .. quantities of flint flakes scattered through the earth of the mound'
          Pottery p63: 'Red wares' [on red tracks], Crock, crocker, and Kiln
          Trading p64: Huck, huckster, peddler/ Iron names, whetstone/ Mark = sighting point and gave name to market, held at such places
          Law tracks p66: Birlaw Court, folkmoot, gemot, hundred-moot, hustings-court, shire-moot, thing, tin, and ting [e.g. Tynwald Hill, I.o.M], Witenagemot./ Scotland: law hills or laws, and law-day / Law-day corrupted into Lady. Hence Lady Oak, Lady Mead, Lady Barrow, Lady Harbour, Lady Pool/ Laugh Lady Oak from Laughman = deputy judge at law-courts/ Lady or law names may mean lawyers passed through on the track
          Fairs, Amusements: St Giles Great fair/ village fetes, Whit-week dancing, Braun horse fair (p 64). Watkins quotes from Pilgrim's Progress '... a track through a business and pleasure fair, a thing of ancient standing'.
    SUN ALIGNMENT/ BEACONS/ CHURCHES ON MARK-POINTS/ ORIENTATION - Light as an aid to finding the way
        It's worth noting that the conception of stonehenge as a calendar or astronomically-related feature, attributed to Norman Lockyer, an astronomer, was ridiculed for years by archaeologists.
        Seasons (p 68): note the importance of the Summer solstice, the winter solstice, and the two equinoxes, and 'half-quarter days' in May & August, and Feb and Nov 'because there was no calendar, and information was needed for farming purposes'.
        There were beacons fired throughout Europe on St John's day (Midsummer), and Beltane day (early May) with a few remaining place names as a mute record
        Orientation of churches (as the name suggests, they face east) and mounds and leys. There's some suggestive evidence related: Watkins's examples include: Sunrising, Midwinter and other small places once near Truro; Welsh phrase 'sunset goes down behind his camps'; May Day at Oxford, when choristers sing on Magdalen Tower; gold or gole possibly meaning sunrise, splendour; sun in Cornish is howl, in Welsh haul, perhaps related to the stone monument 'the hurlers'.     Beacons (pp 19 & 75): Beacon = beckon in Anglo-Saxon. Leye = flame or fire. Shenley=bright ley, Shirley = clear shining ley. Glade is clearing from glaed, bright. Beacon, Bacon means on the track. Watkins think 'tan' means 'fire'; so that, for example, St Ann's Hill is a Christianised version of Tan Hill, a hill with a beacon on top. Watkins says Brent is 'position of the fire station'
        Watkins suggests Lucifer, the bringer of light, seems to have been confused with the devil, or a magician, or man of power, as well as the planet Venus.
        Watkins states (p 42) that the Roman policy on 'pagan' sites was to re-use them. Roman altars were dedicated to local gods; later, under Christianity, churches were built on old sites, aligned with tracks or in lines. Lincoln Cathedral (it occurs to me, RW) is in a very prominent raised site). Foundation stones were a mark stone. Steeplechase suggests the church was a marker; iron fire holders in church towers exist and suggest the same.
    CASTLES ON MARK-SITES/ ASSEMBLIES AT MARK-POINTS - Includes stone circles as likely meeting-places.
        Watkins suggests some folk attitudes are related to leys: Castles have an old meaning as earthworks (p 52); the later meaning as 'Norman motte and bailey' is 'woefully in error - it is certain that the Normans built their keeps on pre-existing .. sighting mounds.'
        Crosses by the wayside, and in churchyards, sometimes with a view hole, were often near mark stones (p 53)
        Crossroads: usually had a mark-stone, and were always treated with reverence, e.g. for burying suicides, or witches potions, or setting down coffins for prayer. Significant names include Iron Cross, White Cross, Baron's Cross, Crow's Ash...
    ROMAN ERA/ PLACE-NAMES/ FOLK-LORE/ HERMES AND HERMIT/ IN OTHER LANDS/ BIBLE RECORD - Traditions of leys perhaps included in old literature
        Note that topography has to be taken into account. Ancient Egypt navigated mostly by the Nile, and perhaps had little need for leys; if they'd had some well-defined track, perhaps leys would be generally accepted.
    CONFIRMATION/ OBSCURITIES AND OBJECTIONS/ CHRONOLOGY/ ALPHA AND OMEGA - Watkins' overview of his idea
        Watkins found many possible Biblical references and mistranslations or misunderstandings: 'narrow straight path' as something desirable. 'Those who rebel against the light, they know not the ways thereof, nor abide in the paths thereof'. 'I will lead them in paths they have not known; I will make darkness light before them, and crooked things straight' and many other passages.
        Light as a guide: Bunyan has a 'shining light' as a guide, leading through a pond. An Egyptian inscription about Ra and Nut sounds like 'Lead Kindly Light' [My note - RW]. Burns' poem about the narrow path, the wider libertine's path, and - a metaphor for hi-jacking of ley lnes by mystics? - the erratic and twiddly faery path
    AN OUTLINE - Summary
        He says, perhaps fortified by then-new aerial observations, (p 57), that there are tracks still visible or underground in mountain and moorland: there are ghosts of tracks when crops ripen, dandelions come out, there are exceptionally dry summers, or they are uncovered by earthmoving or trench cutting. 'Zigzags in modern roads always significant, as indicative of old straight track crossing at the point' (p 90).
        It seems to follow that regions with abundant vegetation—jungle, dense woodlands, wet tropical areas—Could not have had such a system, since tracks could not be laid out, and even if they were, would quickly grow out; and stones and other markers would be difficult to move.



    Academic Fight Back: Williamson & Bellamy's book Ley Lines in Question (1983)

    Ten chapters, posing as a serious investigation. Glyn Daniel, a sort of official Pelican book and BBC-style archaeologist, read their MS. It's amusing to note their maliciously derogatory tone throughout this book: '... traipsing around ... to photograph stones. ... often told he was 'derided' and 'ridiculed'.. more true to say that the discovery [sic] was ignored by the archaeological hierarchy.. Contemporary academics doubted that prehistoric savages had either the desire or the ability to establish a unified and elaborate network across the entire country... On 7th April 1935 the grand master of ley studies finally gave up the ghost...'

    Williamson & Bellamy conflate Watkins' ideas with (for example) those of Devereux & Thompson, Janet and Colin Bord, and John Michell. What's also irritating is that they have no idea that Watkins' folk or fairy tales, e.g. of giants dropping stones, are partly explanatory tales, not, presumably, to be taken literally. Any more than Normans emerging from their castles were regarded as genuine giants. Possibly this is a similar error to assuming "Thomas Wolsey built Hampton Court" meant Wolsey was a superman. At any rate, the reader has to tolerate e.g. 'not all believers in leys think ancient Britons could levitate' and comments on stones revolving or dancing. There's detail on 'zodiacs' as far as I know all post-dating Watkins' death. The comment on a 'unified network' is the same style of misrepresentation. I'm not so sure about 'dowsing' which Watkins would no doubt have heard of, and may, or may not, have believed in, but which in any case is of no relevance to trackways.

    I'll just bullet-point some failings of this book:-
      • The authors don't appreciate the point about a spire as being a thing visible from some distance; potentially therefore the site of a long-term landmark. Instead there are folk tales about churches moving overnight and so on
      • 'Foundation stone' is not in the index, or anywhere in the text, despite Watkins on the symbolism
      • The words notch, gap, scar, and even skyline are not in the index; yet, if leys existed, man-made cuttings would be one of the few surviving pieces of direct evidence as opposed to indirect inference
      • The authors don't appreciate that evidence of a long trackway, if one existed, no doubt overlain by relatively new buildings and other features, may almost entirely have vanished; geological and historical change would need to be considered. It isn't just a trivial matter of going out for a look; as here: 'A ley-line can easily be found and confirmed in a week-end'
      • Watkins tried to generalise overseas: he mentioned claims of similar tracks in Indian North America, India, Biblical countries, Uganda and elsewhere. None of these is indexed
      • Watkins' claim that Silbury Hill was deliberately arranged so its top is visible from surrounding areas is not brought up at all by Williamson and Bellamy; they make an irrelevant point about the Jewish fraud of 'orgone energy', 'discovered by the scientist Wilhelm Reich'. They also make an alarming mistake about the structure of Silbury Hill, claiming it had an internal chamber
      • 'Hillforts': Watkins claims that, originally, their sites (or some of them) were arranged to be serially visible to travellers below, so that as one disappears another suddenly becomes visible. He considered hill forts to be a late development. Williamson and Bellamy made no attempt to verify or check this claim. It may be worth quoting them at some length to see the irrelevance of their attitude to Watkins, and their naive cocksureness: (p 68) 'There is nothing particularly mysterious about hill forts; excavation unequivocally shows that they were built for purposes of defence, and the current claim that they were unoccupied is false. Watkins used twelve Herefordshire hill forts in his leys, and of these four have been extensively excavated, and two have been subjected to small-scale probing. It seems reasonable to accept the results of these .. as representative of others in the area. One, Croft Amburey, is a hill fort on the first ley that Alfred Watkins ever discovered. .. the interior contained rows of rectangular huts, implying a dense population of as many as 70 people per acre. Two, Credden Hill Camp, the ramparts of which Watkins found to be determined by three leys, was excavated in 1963. It was permanently occupied from about 390 BC until AD 75 approximately, with a population at any one time of about 4000. Three, Midsummer Hill and Sutton Walls were clearly permanently occupied villages. The former may have had a population of up to 2000. For Dinedor and Akenbury, though not extensively excavated, both revealed evidence of permanent occupation such as storage pits, domestic refuse and internal buildings. .. These results from 'Antiquity' and some of them are privately published.. The vast majority of excavated hill forts have shown Iron Age occupation to have been the first on the site, and of the excavated Herefordshire hill forts mentioned above none produced evidence of earlier activity. The same is true of all the hill forts in our sample of leys. ...'
      • On the word 'ley'; Williamson and Bellamy seem unaware that Watkins christened them with that name, and was perfectly aware that it may not be what people called them at the time. But whatever the name was, the things may have existed anyway, and in Watkins' view they did
      • Statistical arguments related to points and straight lines. This sort of material seems to have considerable longevity; one of Britain's junk newspapers, the Guardian, has occasional articles on the numbers of buildings in Britain and the numbers on straight lines. This of course completely misunderstands the whole point about laying out paths which can be reliably followed
      • Light as a device to attract attention: this was an important part of Watkins' work, and the idea of man-made moats to reflect light, as an obviously artificial feature, is credible, given the earthworking abilities of ancient peoples. The town of Beaconsfield and others, and the possible use of light and reflecting circles of water, 'beorhs' and 'haloes' and so on, is simply ignored completely; it's just not mentioned anywhere, except as 'beacons are not as popular as they used to be.'
      • Watkins' surveying idea, with the 'dodman' as his word for such persons, is mentioned just three times in this book. There is no consideration, pro or con, of how such a surveying technique would operate in practice.
      • Plenty more. However it's clear the authors wanted to side with what they call 'educated professionals' and had no serious interest in investigating Watkins' hypothesis.

    Alfred Watkins: Proof of Ancient Track Alinement [sic] (1931)

    It has to be said that Alfred Watkins was not his own best advocate. This 1931 piece consists largely of extracts from 'The Ley-Hunter's Manual' of a few years earlier, but is mostly mathematical: he attempts to prove there's a very remote possibility of points being in a line but he seems to have got a bit overwhelmed with maps - '51 churches, practically all ancient, on an Andover map' and with a ruler rather than actually going out to see. He draws little crosses on a paper to estimate probabilities with random dots. A very empirical thing, not impressive. A better approach would be to use contour maps with some sort of tangents constructed from possible sighting points, something possible with computers but not very practical at the time.

    Here's Watkins' own statement on Proof:
    'The proof is chiefly to be found in the fact of certain classes of what are now called ancient monuments aligning with each other, and in fragments of present-day roads or paths being occasionally found on such track-lines. In some cases, however, the alignments have no indications of having been made for track purposes. ... The deduction of an organised system of straight tracks in prehistoric Britain is denied by many critics who put it down to imagination and accidental coincidence and infer [sic] that the theory was formulated first and the facts then selected to fit it. The inference is not correct in my case, for it was not until a large number of alignment facts had been observed that any theory or outline for further investigation was formed as a deduction. ..'


    Email me
    Top of this page
    big-lies.org

    ©RW 2013-10-04 Book review of Watkins first uploaded 2010-10-07; Shoesmith review 2009-02-19. Williamson & Bellamy review uploaded here 2013-10-06. Other material mostly written before 1997.



    'Lunar Wave'
    A New Artefact of Video Cameras

    What are 'Lunar Waves'?
        [1] The screen shot (right) shows a frame from a Youtube video, by crrow77, which allegedly shows a 'lunar wave' travelling down the moon. The phenomenon isn't very obvious in a still picture; I select this one because the red arrow marks the horizontal position of the 'lunar wave' at one instant.
        [2] The 'lunar wave' is clearer in videos in motion: a more-or-less horizontal wave, like a single water ripple, appears to move down the image.
        [3] Typically there is a high magnification; the image may be zoomed in 50x, with the camera presumably on a secure tripod, so that the image doesn't move.
        [4] Refraction caused by air currents is common is such conditions: this is not what's under discussion here.
        [5] The moon appears to move through the sky, mainly because the earth rotates; in one hour it will move through roughly 1/24 of the entire sky, or 15°. That is, 1/4° per minute, or 1/240° per second.
        [6] Video cameras typically save 25 or 30 entire frames per second. One frame therefore allows about 1/7000° of lunar motion. Depending on the number of pixels and the magnification, the entire lunar image will shift 1 pixel in its direction of motion in some calculable time.
        [7] Because the sun, moon and earth are in the same plane, the moon's motion will appear to be perpendicular to the sun's shadow on the moon.
        [8] The pixels appear to be scanned one by one; very fast, but not simultaneous. Some pixels will happen to be on the point of changing to their neighboring pixel; and clumps of these pixels will be in lines. Above the line will show an image 1/25th or 1/30th of a second before or behind the image below the line, depending on the way the image scans.
        [9] I conclude the 'lunar wave' is an artefact of the way video cameras work. (As are 'rods' - see below). This is testable. Using the same camera in the same way, but turned through an angle, for example upright, at a right angle rather than the natural horizontal position, is predicted to give a wave at whatever angle the camera is tilted.
        To check it's not lunar, what's needed is high magnification of an object which is almost static, but not quite; a shadow thrown by the sun on a striped fabric should do the trick. Again, a wave should be visible as the pixels scan horizontally in the camera.

    supposed lunar wave from Youtube

    Moon as Back Projection?

    Related idea based on the wrong idea of the moon as being subject to linear waves.

    Rob Skiba (right) has a competent piece on Youtube debunking NASA's images of the earth from space: his arguments include the absurdly small number of such images, the use of a round dark window (see picture, from FLAT EARTH CONSPIRACY EXPOSED) to convincingly simulate a planetary outline, the obviously cut-and-pasted repeats of bits of clouds, and an image of the earth, rotating, in which the clouds remain completely static—even though the rotation time exceeds one day!

    However, he goes on to speculate about the moon being a back projection in the sky of a flat earth, and uses the digital refresh argument (above) as a possible confirmation. Which, of course, it isn't. His site is a Biblical site: the devil, or Satan, being a patient person, and the Bible being regarded as a scientific compendium. Oh, well. At least he's not an obvious fraud, like NASA.

    'Flat Earth' Promotion - Why?

    Skiba's non-American name, and this odd nonsensical idea, seem to be a small part of a push for a flat earth. I can't decide why: poking fun at stupid whites? Part of the de-education function of anti-white activity? Time-wasting activities to help destroy whites in the Bible belt USA? Is there Jewish money in it? Maybe someone has a good idea, out there, what if anything is behind this? Here's my article; apologies for it being in another file:-
    Flat Earth Promotion; Why?



    [ Top of page ]
    HTML and Image capture and comment on 'lunar waves' - Rae West/ Uploaded 1st Dec 2014.
    Rob Skiba and 'flat earth' promotion - upload 15 July 2105. Airplane window image 14 Nov 2015.
    Rob Skiba debunker of NASA planet images
    round airplane window view

    The Case Against the Monarchy

    Case Against the Monarchy

    Souvenir from Mayday 2000.
    © Movement Against The Monarchy
    (I believe four people were arrested on the day).



    Top
    big-lies Home Page
    • Criticism, or for that matter plain description, of the monarchy is absent from the academic world. This is Tom Nairn (a Scot) in his book The Enchanted Glass: Britain and its Monarchy (1988):
      Middle-brow ... reflection functions to preserve the national totem-system; the sense of proportion thus expressed is then refracted upwards to the high-brow or academic sphere as simple avoidance—an integrated intellectual elite's chosen form of allegiance. Hence the remarkable result: the British Monarchy, one of the sociological wonders of the contemporary world, Europe's greatest living fossil, the enchanted glass of an early modernity which has otherwise vanished from the globe, has received next to no attention from British social theory. .. such attention as it has got consists mainly in acts of worship rather than examination.


      Nairn, with the contorted writing-style induced by academic sociology, naively seems to assume this is unique; but what has 'British social theory' to say on public school education, or world empires and arms, or the Church of England, or law, or the military etc?
              Nairn's book gives little evidence as to how much power (or money) the monarchy actually has—not of course easy to estimate; nor does he situate it historically. He describes in a piecemeal way things like gawping uncritical public, royal speech habits, clothing and travel habits.
    • In Britain, to avoid the dangers of thoughtful comparisons in this area, little is published about the Japanese monarchy and its myths. (The Japanese had a coronation, broadcast for the first time on television, at about the same time as the much-trumpeted coronation of Elizabeth in Britain in the 1950s, no doubt accompanied by similar absurdities and nationalistic mythologies. I can't remember a single commentator pointing this out.) Or how the Italians got rid of their monarchy (they voted them out after the Second World War), or how the Swedes and others tamed theirs. There's little on the Thai monarchy, South African black monarchies, or the various more or less manufactured Arab monarchies.
    • Nairn quotes an amusing remark by Laurie Taylor, a sort of pop journalist sociologist, to the effect that criminals regard the Monarchy as supreme rip-off artists. 'It's marvellous the way they kid people. Honestly, it's incredible. I watched the Duke of Edinburgh the other night talking about the Royal Yacht. It's an ocean-going liner..'
    • Nairn also quotes from Dreams about Her Majesty the Queen, and other members of the Royal Family by Brian Masters (1972). 'Up to one third of the country' has dreamt about the Queen, usually [female dreamers] coming for a cup of tea and becoming miraculously ordinary or 'hopeless with money' or [male dreamers] having to be saved heroically from snarling assassins.
              A novel by Emma Tennant, Hotel de Dream (1976): 'Miss Briggs dreamed she was at the Royal Garden Party. As always the Queen was quick to notice her in the crowd and, pushing past through the officious and over-protective equerries, made her way through the throng of eagerly waiting subjects to reach Miss Briggs's side..' She is the Queen's 'adviser from the common people', secretly helping her to restore a sense of meaning to life..'
    • A little-known fact is the non-nativeness of the Royals; in other words, they weren't even British. (Somewhere I've seen a brief note on this subject, which seemed authoritative, but I can't relocate it). Thus the various Anglo-Saxon monarchies (and occasional Danes) were headed by invaders. The Norman conquest was from France (the Normans being something like Vikings). The Plantagenets derived largely from Anjou. The Tudors were Welsh, James was Scottish, (but originating in France) and Germans predominated later—in the Houses of Brunswick and Hanover, for example, with Albert a prominent example, responsible for introducing Christmas Trees and German bands.
              Edgar Wilson in The Myth of the British Monarchy (Journeyman Books, 1989) wrote:
      As to the Britishness of the Monarchy, that is a black joke. Geoffrey Bocca has interestingly pointed out that the present Queen is the first British sovereign to have British blood in her veins; and that through her Scottish mother. [G Bocca, The Uneasy Heads: A Report on European Monarchy. Note that this is 1959.] The dynastic name 'Windsor' was chosen only in 1917 at the height of the First World War by the Hanover-Saxe-Coburg-Gothas, .. to deflect anti-German feeling. When the Kaiser heard that his cousins had changed the family name, he commanded a performance of 'The Merry Wives of Saxe-Coburg-Gotha'. Prince Philip .. abandoned his traditional name of Schleswig-Holstein Sönderberg-Glücksberg for similar reasons of pubic relations expediency in 1947, and assumed the name Mountbatten, which is just an anglicisation of Battenberg.. ever since the Revolution Settlement of 1689, the British Monarchy has been the instrument of the plutocratic establishment of Britain, .. deployed to legitimise an unjust and inequitable social structure. For this purpose it has always been more convenient to have mediocre and tamed foreign princelings, 'Hanoverian Mercenaries', on the British throne. That is the real tradition..


    • Republicanism in Britain reached some sort of high point in about 1870, with Bagehot's The English Constitution (1867), including remarks on the Prince of Wales as 'an unemployed youth', W. M. Thackeray's The Four Georges (1869), and Charles Bradlaugh's booklet An Impeachment of the House of Brunswick (various dates given: 1871, or 1874). Dilke battled Gladstone in Parliament. Frederic Harrison (later a professor of jurisprudence and international law) wrote an article in Fortnightly Review (all reference to which is omitted from the Oxford Companion to English Literature).
              There's an idea that one of the most important British traditions is radicalism, but it is suppressed: '.. a set of values based on the ideas of freedom, equality and democracy.. [but] the very fact that an alternative tradition has been in existence for many centuries is simply not known to many people' (Benn, intro. to Writings on the Wall (1984).
    •  
      Philip in GermanyCaption: 'Throughout his married life, Prince Philip has made secret trips to visit his German relations on their Estates. Here he is photographed with his brother-in-law, Berthold, after a wild boar hunt at Zwingenberg in 1959.'
              [From Unity Hall's book Philip, the Man Behind The Monarchy (1987) Michael O'Mara Books Ltd, London © News Group Newspapers]

      Despite his name, Philip's relatives were royalty in Greece; after the Second World War they just survived a plebiscite and were permitted to return. (After the First World War, when Turkey sided with Germany, Prince Andrew of Greece, widely regarded as a pro-German traitor, was condemned to death, but was saved by British intervention.)

      Philip's occupation during the Second World War (I believe) was supervising painting of ships of the far east fleet.

    • Cannadine
    • Edgar Wilson's book makes considerable efforts to deal with journalistic ideas about the monarchy. One such idea is that the monarchy is good for British business and tourism. His chapter can't be included in full, but typical passages include:-


    • Edgar Wilson, Spain
    • Edgar Wilson wrote:
      Not even strict legitimacy has been maintained.. In proposing The Impeachment of the House of Brunswick.. Charles Bradlaugh was able to appeal to the fact that, out of 33 monarchs in the succession from William the Conqueror to Victoria, only 13 had succeeded by straightforward hereditary right. Students of Constitutional Law at Oxford used to be entertained by Maitland's demonstration that the House of Saxe-Coburg-Gotha had no legal title to the throne of England. Only by changing the rules could it be legitimated. [Heuston, 1964, Essays in Constitutional Law.] One monarchist, Charles Petrie, recognises that the present dynasty, 'the Hanoverians, were usurpers.. depending on a minority whose fortunes were linked to theirs, for both in 1715 and 1745 the English people had shown .. that it was not prepared to lift a finger to keep them on the throne.'


              On the subject of legitimacy, an interesting possibility involves Queen Victoria—and her numerous descendants—and the rather absurdly-named genetic disease haemophilia ('love of blood'). Geneticists use Royalty to research into human genetics, because there are centuries of relatively detailed records. In about 1995 it was suggested, possibly not for the first time, that Queen Victoria could not have been the child of her 'father', who did not carry the gene, but was a substitute, her ambitious 'parents' pretending to have produced her, as a child was needed quickly to get priority. These modern journalists actually found a descendant of the duke who would otherwise have become the monarch. I think I'm right in saying this story was the province of the low budget newspapers.
    • Kingsley Martin The Magic of Monarchy (1937), largely dealing with Mrs Simpson... Edward VIII ideas and The Crown and the Establishment (Penguin Special, 1962)
    • Lead in water and Bryce-Smith
    • Queen and commonwealth meeting
    • One sometimes meets pro-monarchists who are aristocrats; their support for monarchy seems a little dishonest, like the support given by hangers-on, property managers, lawyers, and other beneficiaries. Presumably the idea is that one big absurdity shelters and prevents people noticing many lesser ones. I've seen what I take to be this psychology in Nikolai Tolstoy (who has a pro-monarchy website.....) and in Burford, the Oxfordian.
    • Willie Hamilton, son of a coalminer from Durham, north-east England, and one of four children, autobiography in 1992 Blood on the Walls was anti-monarchical all his life.
              My Queen and I (1975) was, he claimed, a best-seller: but 'some well-known booksellers in London and the provinces refused to stock it. My brother tried to buy it in Newcastle, but was told by the bookseller that he had no intention of selling it. .. that shop was still selling Karl Marx's Das Kapital and Hitler's Mein Kampf.' A passage in his autobiography looks at the Queen's assets:
      From time to time 'guesstimates' have been made of the Queen's private wealth. The latest have quoted astronomical figures up to £6,000 million. In 1971 the Queen's official spokesman told our Select Committee that the estimate of £50 million then being made was 'wildly exaggerated'. He must have been told to use these words by the Queen herself. Pressed to be more specific, he refused to go any further. That Committee was probably the most powerful ever set up in Parliament. The Chairman was the Chancellor of the Exchequer. The membership consisted of a former Prime Minister, Ministers and ex-Ministers, Privy Counsellors [sic] and senior MPs. The Crown refused to supply that Committee which information which it felt it had the right to have.
              Parliament meekly accepted that rebuff. Unless and until some Government and some Parliament has the courage and guts to deal with the financing of the monarchy based on principles of openness, fairness, and honesty, the present unsatisfactory situation will get worse. .. The royal wealth, and the financing..., remain among the most tightly guarded secrets in the world...
              The mythology surrounding the Crown Estate is one of the more obvious examples. .. we are asked to believe that virtually the whole of central London is the property of the Queen. We are further asked to believe that the profits made are 'voluntarily' surrendered by her in exchange for the Civil List, and because the profits of the Crown Estate are greater than the publicised cost of the monarchy, then we are actually making a profit out of our long-suffering royals. The Establishment has brainwashed us into accepting this bunkum.

    Top of this page
    big-lies.org
    2000-May-8th


    • The Hossack Suspension Motorbike Redesign

    Norman Hossack's redesigned motorbike suspension; a Warning to Inventors

    © Rae West 2013



    I heard about Norman Hossack, through a remote car industry connection, and spoke to him, about fifteen years ago. He was and no doubt still is an inventor. One of his projects was a redesign of motorbikes; his idea was to make the chassis flexible, and introduce spring suspension horizontally, for example under the saddle. This would remove the need for the elaborate and expensive technology of front forks and springs, and remove the plunging effect caused by this crude suspension. The resulting bike would be lighter, nimbler, safer, and far more fuel efficient. Instead of a hefty machine which could only be lifted with difficulty we'd have light, cheaper, and less dangerous motorbikes, far more useful to average consumers around the world, and far more fuel-saving. (It doesn't seem to me very different from many mountain bikes now, pivoting at the pedal point and with horizontal springing, so the front and back wheels are not linked by a rigid frame). This would also be 'third-world' and difficult terrain friendly; I'm faintly reminded of carts in India which look as though they'd wobbling to the point of falling apart but in fact are designed that way.

    Norman produced prototypes and asked German Standards (DIN - notoriously stringent) to test them, which they did. I'm told he was awarded a certificate that his design was completely safe and satisfactory.

    As far as I know, nothing useful to him ever resulted; when we spoke, he was exasperated, annoyed, and distraught. And he was keen to warn other inventors to be careful. He had numerous stories to reinforce his point, such as the inventor who lived in his car (with wife and child), the 'Prince of Wales Award' for inventors which he regarded as phoney, and a Japanese company that photographs their executives returning inventors' submissions unopened.

    Here's his website Hossack Design (opens in a new window).

    And here's a bike of, or based on, his design.





    His other designs included a two-stroke engine with a one-piece, pivoting, piston. Top of this page
    big-lies.org


    ©Rae West 5 May 2013. Bit added 16 Oct 2013.   Every possible right reserved.     E-mail.


    The Truth About Muesli!!
    muesli yogurt health food

     

    Top of this page
    big-lies.org

    Muesli—the Horrifying Truth !!

    © Rae West 2000


    You will be sold packages of oats, grains, dried fruit, powdered milk, nuts—and sugar—as ‘muesli’. BUT the horrific fact is: this is not muesli!!     No!! Muesli was invented (or popularised) by a Swiss, Dr Bircher-Benner. Hence the correct name, Bircher-muesli. His recipe for a health-giving breakfast was grated or chopped fruit, topped with a small amount of grain or nuts. The stuff in packages is an impostor!     The reason it's come to be called ‘muesli’ is simply the technical difficulty of packaging squashy fruit. Not only that; the pronunciation of the word is usually wrong. It should rhyme with “fiercely”.


    ©Rae West 11 May 2000.   Every possible right reserved.     E-mail.


    Orbs

     

    Top of this page
    big-lies.org

    'Orbs': More Misinterpreted Artefacts of Photo Equipment

    © Rae West 2015

    Two types of 'Orb':

    orb
    [1] Effects of intense light source, usually the sun, reflecting inside the camera lens. (See picture). Many people I suppose don't know that camera lenses are complicated, including internal lenses; some of plastic, some, for moving pictures, with image stabilisation. It would seem obvious enough from the way the image moves that they are connected with the sun's position. The shape may be affected by the iris, the device which varies the amount of light allowed through. Some video editors have this effect as something that can be added to your video.

    [2] Out of focus light source (not illustrated), where for example automatic focussing hasn't time to work, or is viewing though a window or some atmospheric condition which prevents focussing.
    crap

    Sun or Moon Nearer than Clouds? Another misconception


    The sun is of course enormously bright; bright enough to shine through thin clouds. Some people see this, and think the sun is closer than clouds. Despite the fact that thick cloud always hides the sun. There seems to be a cottage industry of junk Youtubes on this issue; maybe it's training for propagandists. I recently noticed a similar example, with a full moon. Sigh....



    Orion's Belt: Was this in fact Orion's Penis?

    An addendum to Robert Bauval's Theory on Orion, Sirius, and the Great Pyramid
    © Rae West 1998, 1999

    Click for Top of this page   |   Click for Home page of entire big-lies.org site
    Summary: This short article makes a case for what's now called Orion's belt in fact having been perceived by the ancient Egyptians (or at least the priestly ones) as a penis. As I'll show, this fits very well with the theories originating with Robert Bauval as to the function of the Great Pyramid, the so-called pyramid of Cheops.
    Orion elevated in the southern sky at Giza
    This (< image, left) is the way Orion is generally represented (illustration from the program Skyglobe.) In this full, more fanciful, version, Orion brandishes a club and holds up a skin or shield. Sirius is below and left of Orion.

    Robert Bauval was the first known person to suggest that the groundplan of the three Giza pyramids and their relation to the Nile and some other pyramids imitated Orion's belt, the Milky Way, and some other stars in Orion.

    Bauval and Hancock maintain (I think; my information's from a lecture) that in 2450 BC, a month before the spring equinox, the sun rose (in the east) after Leo had risen between the paws of the sphinx. And, in the southern sky, Orion was simultaneously positioned with its belt at exactly 45 degrees to the horizon. These and other alignments are explained by Bauval and Hancock as being involved in a ceremony involving the dead Pharaoh, whose essence or soul (in Egyptian) was, they say, believed to be expelled through one of the four shafts from the Great Pyramid, to become permanently resident as a star. The 'opening of the mouth' ceremony was part of this.

    This illustration shows Orion (Sah, apparently, to the Egyptians) as it would appear in 2450 BC - though I have to confess my Skyglobe gives it an impossible afternoon time.

    The Egyptians' perception of this part of the sky was different from ours; Duat was Orion plus Sirius, and other stars, considered as a mobile unit; Sirius was called Sopdet, a goddess, later Graecised/Romanised to Sothis.


    modern view of 'Orion'
    The 'opening of the mouth' (image right) (with a tool shaped like the constellation we call the great bear) allowed air to inspire the corpse; or simulate feeding; or at any rate do something related to life. The dead Pharaoh is believed to have had an artificial phallus attached, as the expulsion mechanism.

    The phallic motif seems to have been strongly present in Egypt (though of course largely censored by the Victorians and more modern archaeologists). Min, or Amun-Min, one of the manifestations of the ram god, is the outstanding example.


    Orion as seen by the Egyptians?
    With their fantastic mixture of analogies and coincidence, and projections of nature into cosmology, one would imagine the priests could not believe the 45 degree elevation of the three stars could be insignificant. Just as some stars vanished for nine months before 'rebirth', or the sun seemed to be feeble at dawn and evening and strong in 'middle age', or meteors sometimes left the mysterious substance iron, or the moon might look like the sun seen through the belly of the goddess Nut, I'd suggest the configuration here is what the Egyptians had in mind.

    After all, what's so fascinating about a belt? Why build an elaborate shaft from the King's chamber to look at a belt?


    This shows the painted interior of a sandstone shrine or chapel at Deir el-Bahari/Der el-Bahri, dedicated by Tuthmosis III to the cow goddess Hathor. The king makes an offering to Amun (or Amun-Ra - accounts vary!).

    I'd draw your attention to the triangular skirt or kilt of the king; this shape was fashionable for a long while and is frequently shown being worn (e.g. by Tutankhamun). Is it possible this is a reflection of Orion's shape? Perhaps the triangular shoulder arrangement represents Orion too. One might also speculate about the nature of the offering depicted here.


    Tuthmosis' shrine to Hathor
    Incredibly durable image: 3000 BC image of 'smiting an Asiatic'
    Incredibly durable image (left): this shows ‘King Den smiting an Asiatic’, dated by the British Museum at about 3000 BC. Virtually identical images occur in Ptolemaic times, e.g. at Edfu, dated about 70 BC. Possibly based on the Orion (and Hercules) image.

    However, the ancient Egyptians seem to have recorded no accurate star diagrams; if so, it's impossible to be certain how they interpreted the star patterns they saw.


    'Cerne Abbas giant'
    ‘Cerne Abbas giant’; (image right) could this be Orion? Current Archaeology (#156) has Rodney Castleden investigating the figure. On its date, he says there is no documentary reference before the 17th century. On its shape, Castleden found no evidence of a dog, or a horned god, perhaps therefore ruling out Celtic origins. (He also found evidence for a shorter penis, topped by a navel). However, there is evidence suggesting a face or head once existed below the outstretched arm (which may have had a fist, not an open hand). Castleden adds: ‘Comparable images can be found in the Iron Age, in a belt extending.. from Britain to Romania.’ So if it is a relatively recent folly, there are nevertheless similar authentic images elsewhere.


    Some information here is taken from a talk by Bauval and Hancock at Waterstone's Bookshop, Canterbury, 29 May 1996. Also from several books jointly-authored by Bauval. There's a TV programme on the subject, introduced not inappropriately by Emma Freud, first shown in 1994, with Robert Bauval and Adrian Gilbert, of The Orion Mystery. I should make it clear that 'Duat' meant something like the Underworld in Egyptian; Bauval and Hancock say the same word applies to a section of the sky. I'm pleased that Bauval & Gilbert and others did their astronomical work; but I ought to add that, of course, I have reservations about it.
          NB: the supposed superimposition of the three stars of the belt with the apexes of the pyramids looks slightly unconvincing, with the stars shown overexposed, suggesting the fit mightn't be as good as is implied. If somebody checks this, could he/she also see whether the original version of the phrase ‘Orion's belt’ has an ambiguity or possible other meaning? Thanks. Incidentally this piece is meant entirely seriously.


    E-Mails

    Wayne Hay [July 98] e-mailed: 'Rae West asks if the belt might be a penis....well it probably is....because one of the functions of the Pharaoh on special holy days was to enter the Temple and ritually masturbate....this was treated recently by an archaeological presentation on educational television....and since generation was through the essence of the god, all creation was supposed to have sprung from the god in this way....refer to masturbation as a sacred art in Egyptian religious hierarchy...' [His dots-RW]

          Yes, I was delicately hinting at this. I think you may mean a BBC 'Timewatch', titled 'Karnak, a Hidden History', with voiceover by Andrew Sachs, better known as Manuel of 'Fawlty Towers'. The huge set of buildings at Karnak may have had such a ceremony in its inner 'sanctum', a masturbation ceremony supposedly related to the daily copulation of the sun with his mother the moon, plus an annual boat ride by the Pharaoh to sister smaller temple at Luxor. But the ceremony very secret, and these things were never written down. The evidence appeared to be a woman, the wife of god, translated also as 'the hand of god', suggesting a masturbation link; someone (Osiris?? - I forget) 'making love to his fist'. The images found (none in Karnak) naturally were subject to censorship by the Victorians.


    Stephen R Wilk of Saugus, MA, April/May 1999: '.. Orion's Belt being a penis. I must congratulate you on this discovery, which I believe to be correct. ... [my dots-RW] I originally believed that the "sword" of Orion represented his penis, but your explanation of the belt being the penis is a far better explanation (even though proposed for the case of Egyptian Osiris), and fits in very nicely with my interpretations of the astronomical significance of the myth of Orion. I can provide further detials if you are interested.'
          I haven't received further details, but Stephen Wilk's interest is ancient Greek mythology and variable stars, suggested by a 1979 piece by a Prof. Lettvin of MIT: 'This is a connection I think most people have overlooked. I have a book forthcoming on the topic. "Medusa: Solving the Mystery of the Gorgon" is coming out in December of 1999 from Oxford University Press, and deals with connections between the constellations of Perseus, Andromeda, Cepheus, Cassiopeia, Pegasus, and Cetus with the myth of Medusa and Perseus.'
          Wilk's idea is that 'the variability of Algol was known in pre-classical Greece, and that knowledge of the period is reflected in the myth of Perseus. Moreover, knowledge of the variability of Algol, Mira, delta Cephei, and gamma Cassiopoeia accounts for all their parent constellations being associated in the same myth as antagonists of Perseus.' His book is not yet published, but the sample he sent me includes the suggestion that the immortality of two of the three gorgons corresponds with the two bright days of Algol, the third, eclipsed, day [of its 70 hour period] being represented by Medusa. The Perseid meteor shower 'appears to originate from the arm of the constellation of Perseus. It is very easy to see in the display Perseus hurling the eye of the Graeae into Lake Tritonis.' Wilk has many interesting related ideas: 'the most peculiar image associated with the myth—the birth of Chrysaor and Pegasus from the neck of Medusa.. [can be explained by] the constellations of Perseus (with Medusa's head) and Pegasus. If we interpret Hesiod's words to mean that Pegasus and Chrysaor sprang from the stump of the neck attached to the head, rather than from the stump attached to the body, then the scene is pictured in that grouping of stars.'

          Comments: I have a few miscellaneous suggestions which may or may not be original—I'm not sure:

    Greeks, Constellations, and Human Genetics—Mnemonics?

        [1] It strikes me one of the purposes of myths may have been as a mnemonic in memorising star patterns. Personally I think—you may disagree—many of the constellations have such vague outlines that they could be redrawn arbitrarily (especially the long sinuous ones). There are exceptions, like Cassiopeia and I suppose the bears. However, in a period when reading the stars was an important navigational device, it would make sense to pass on the interpretation in the form of stories, rather than just listing the patterns and flatly stating which is which. Also of course it's more memorable to give them striking and anthropomorphic names. So myths may have had a serious teaching purpose, which nobody took literally.
        [2] On the same subject, I wondered whether you've looked into cross-cultural attitudes to the stars? Possibly there are completely different collections of stars used e.g. in Mongolia. For that matter, I wouldn't be surprised if e.g. mariners at one time emphasised different stars from land-based people. However, I admit this is very difficult to study!
        [3] As I understand it, although nobody seems to word it like this, the Egyptians used stars as a sort of clock—Sirius rising being so to speak a large example; on a daily basis other stars were used to time what we'd call 4 hours, or 6, or whatever. So they may have had a different idea of what a constellation is—i.e. a string of bright stars stretched out like a long necklace with just a few things on it, different from our localised clump of stars.
          '.. if you look into the astronomies of other cultures you usually find the constellations are very different. One of the headaches of this sort of study is finding the constellations of other cultures set down anywhere. .. In most cases we don't really know what the constellation looked like. Even for the case of Egyptian constellations, for which we have many depictions, the identification of actual star patterns with constellation names is still tentative..
        In some cases the constellations suggest a form, so we can see why the ancient people gave it the name they did, or the attributes they did. One particularly clear case is that of Taurus. The "V" shape defined by the Hyades pretty clearly suggests the horns of a bull. Another case is Scorpio, where the J + T shape of the stars suggests a scorpion's coiled stinger. .. Curiously, one case of interest to us both shows that our expectations are not always fulfilled. The constellation of Orion seems clearly defined, with the large rectangle of stars, marked by the three stars of the belt/penis. Yet most cultures do not consider the four stars of the rectangle part of the constellation at all! The three "belt' stars are seen as an arrow, or as cooking fires, or some such figure, and Betelgeuse, Rigel, Bellatrix are not even considered. This, by the way, is one reason I find Bauval's pyramid thesis convincing -- considering the belt apart from the other stars as a constellation is the way most of the world sees the constellation.'
        24th April 2000: Stephen Wilks has set up a website www.medusamystery.com (this may no longer exist).

    Greek Mythology as a Guide to Human Genetics?

    Just as mythological stories could have been a guide to the stars—fixing them in the mind, and for example providing markers for such things as the signs of the zodiac—quite an intellectual achievement! A scribbled note of mine, originating from consideration of the Greek Goddess Ate, indicates Tantalos fathered Pelops, who fathered Atreus and Thyrsites, with Agamemnon a later twig of the family tree. For some reason, possibly the difficulty of typesetting family trees, these structures seem relatively hard to find in older references: Lempriere says Ate, the goddess of all evil, and daughter of Jupiter. ... raised such jealousy and sedition in heaven among the gods, that Jupiter ... banished her forever from heaven.... Brewer says much the same. Greekmythology.com says with the opulence of cheap text: Ate was the goddess of mischief and ruin in Greek mythology, daughter of Eris, goddess of strife, or in some accounts, daughter of Zeus. She had numerous siblings, including Horcus, Ponos, Algea, the Hysminai, the Makhai, the Phonoi, the Androktasiai, the Neikea, the Pseudologoi, the Amphilogiai, Dysnomia, Limos, and Lethe. They were all personifications of wrong doings or negative [sic] situations, such as pain, fights, murder, lies and forgetfulness. ... They remind me of some family trees—perhaps a symbolist version of the Jukes family?
          Is it possible that mythical family trees might contain helpful mnemonic indications of genetic tendencies? Just a thought.


    Disclaimer: I noticed, in Feb 1999, that 'Orion' is occasionally used as an acronym for a slogan 'Our Race is Our Nation', an obviously inaccurate claim (except perhaps for the Chinese?) At any rate, no racial significance was or is intended by this article - RW [writing in 2000]


    Top of this page
    Click for Top of this page
    Click for Home page of entire big-lies.org site

    HTML Rae West. First uploaded 98-04-08 revised 98-04-30, 2000-05-25. Cerne added 96-06-15. Emails 99-09-24. Wilks link 2000-04-24. Re-uploaded as standalone file (reformatted) 2016-07-30



    Just a brief comment on Peter Merlin Cane, of petermerlincane.wordpress.com who has a theory, dating from 2012, about (almost literally) graffiti or sgraffiti (I think that's more or less right) in Renaissance paintings and murals. My only observation is that, in http://www.thehistoryblog.com/archives/25920 I found a note on Michelangelo's hiding place under the basilica of San Lorenzo. A comment, 2013-10-18 21:25:20, by Peter Baker, is n exactly the same style. I'd suggest 'Peter Merlin Cane' is in fact Peter Baker. The nickname may be partly suggested by the interest 'Peter Merlin Cane' shows in Arthurian myths/legends and perhaps truths. The 'Cane' part may be a dog reference, as in Mondo Cane, an Italian film, Dog World. Peter Merlin Cane shows a lecturer's facility with Italian and its pronunciation.
    Rae West 30 Dec 2016. Posted here because the tedium of logging into clueforum.info


    Why You Should Avoid the Phrase 'Political Correctness'. Please.

    by Rae West © 1998


    Summary: Anyone sensitive to the use of language must be irritated by the adoption, which is still going on, of 'political correctness' and 'politically correct' by third-rate journalists ...
    ... having difficulty finding a subject. Other rather sad Americanisms include 'feisty', which seems to have hit the UK after being prominent in the US in about the 1950s. And the strange 'noddy shot' US mannerism, useful for TV, of accompanying banal assertions with head nodding, useful for TV. And the anomalous rising intonation at the end of a statement. One is reminded of Richard Dawkins' word 'meme', itself a meme, a mental object infecting the brains of the unwary.

    In 'Year 501', Noam Chomsky says the phrase 'politically correct' was coined as far back as 1991. This was to forestall critical comments on the 1992 Columbus celebrations; i.e. in simple language, to take the piss out of people taking the piss out of Columbus. ‘Its extent is truly something to behold, .. stream of best-sellers with anecdotes, many concocted, about alleged horrors in the universities, .. gushed forth suddenly, as if on command; .. one six-month period found over a mention per day in the Los Angeles Times.’

    A computer search reveals:‘.. Extraordinary deceit has been required to conceal the fact that it has been primarily the US, secondarily Britain, that have vetoed Security Council resolutions and generally undermined the UN for over 20 years... The hysteria about "political correctness" is an interesting domestic analogue; to the totalitarian mentality, even the slightest loss of control is an unimaginable catastrophe, and evokes the most impressive frenzy. ...’

    ‘.. this [Univ of Virginia] is after all Thomas Jefferson's university, and he had some thoughts on that topic too. His thought, .. was that the university should guarantee the men of virtue, those who were going to govern the country, only have correct thoughts. They have to be indoctrinated in political correctness. It would be extremely dangerous to allow them to hear heretical doctrines. In fact part of the reason for founding the University of Virginia was so that bright young people in the South who were going to be the governing class not be infected by heretical doctrines they might hear in places like, say, Harvard. ..’

    [Note: I know this isn't very well written. After all, who wants to waste time on this tripe? Where's the beef? ...]

     [Note added January 2013: 'Political correctness' appears to have been a translation of an expression used after Jews took over Russia. Each Red Army unit had an attached person, no doubt Jewish, to make sure the military units did what Jews approved, and report back].

    Top
    big-lies.org

    Rae West First uploaded 98-01-21 Revn 98-06-21




    Trying to Solve the Arabic or Egyptian Puzzle Ring

    © Raeto West 1998

    FOUR-PART PUZZLE RING.   Click here for 8-part ring (below)
    Top interesting, if perhaps trivial, things
    Contents of entire big-lies site

    Picture of a four-part puzzle ring


    schematic arrangement of sub-ringsThis drawing shows how the sub-rings of a four-part ring are arranged. Note that the two outermost sub-rings form the two blobs on each edge of the centre of the ring. Note also that they don't overlap; if you imagine the two shaded sub-rings vanish, the V and inverted-V sub-rings don't interlock (and in fact are held together by the inner sub-rings).

    Now, looking at the inner pair of sub-rings, note that these, although overlapping in an X arrangement, are also in fact independent - and are held together by the other sub-pair.

    These drawings show the two pairs of sub-rings as though separated; note that neither pair interlocks with its partner.

    The trick is to fit the pair shown below with their X in front of the pair shown above, and with its rings sandwiched between those of the ring on top, which are shown opened out as though to allow this.

    You should be able to identify the top pair easily; usually there's more wear on the outside, which helps reassure you you've got the pair right. You have to judge which way up the other two sub-rings have to go to fit into the gaps made by the top pair.

    Because they're interlocked, all this is a bit tricky.

    Drawing of two sub-pairs of ring


    However, the arrangement above is NOT what's wanted; the correct method, or anyway my method, is to match two pairs of sub-rings in the way they actually link, i.e. an outer ring with its neighbour, and, located opposite, the other outer ring with its neighbour.

    The two pairs should be arranged so they're in the same plane, i.e. in principle all that's needed is to twist one pair around and all four parts will nestle together.

    .. And in fact this is what you do! Clearly, though, since the ring pretty well holds together, it's essential to open up the two outer rings, then juggle the other pair into place, and close the outermost ones neatly on the other two. (This stage isn't illustrated - it's no fun if it's too easy, is it?)

    And voilà! Congratulations on solving your ring. Don't forget to tie the rings together rather tightly.


    EIGHT-PART PUZZLE RING

    Eight part puzzle ring


    schematic arrangement of eight sub-ringsThis drawing shows roughly how the sub-rings of an eight-part ring are arranged - I haven't attempted to show the overlaps accurately. As you can see, it's something of a cheat: in effect, it's the same as the four-part ring, except that the outer rings are each split into three, which, with two cross-over rings, make a total of eight.

    In this arrangement, the two rings with the X arrangement are special: holding up any sub-ring will show up the clump of six sub-rings. It's easy to identify the two groups of three (numbered 1,2,3 and 6,7,8 in the diagram) by checking their shaped parts.

    This picture shows the two pairs of three rings and the pair which cross in front, on a couple of fingers; you may find it easiest to use tape to fix the sets of three together.

    The next stage (not shown, mainly because it's difficult to scan in) is to interleave the two sets of three rings; they have to be arranged with their shaped regions facing each other, then interleaved one at a time; this is fairly easy since the sub-rings have depressions marked on them. If you can do this, you'll have...

    Picture showing parts of ring on different fingers

    six of the eight rings solved...... a ring which looks almost solved, with six pairs fitted together, but with a gap between, and two sub-rings hanging loosely, which are an obvious fit; as with the four-part ring above, the trick is to get these two sub-rings across the front of the arrangement, with their flat parts touching and sandwiched between the outer stacks of sub-rings. If you haven't yet done this, you might tape together the pair of three sub-rings.

    Unfortunately, it's difficult to describe the next stage. Clearly it must be possible to insert the two spare rings into the six - since, when the ring was taken apart, the reverse process happened. All I suggest is that you try to work out how one ring must be positioned so that it simultaneously has its narrow end where it should be, and the wavy end correctly orientated. There are several ways of doing this and (unless the sub-rings were marked in some way) I don't think you can know in advance the correct way. (If the parts are the wrong way round, the complete ring is unlikely to fit properly, and will look slightly wrong). Open the interlaced sets of rings and try to insert the sub-ring; jiggle it, and if it fits snugly, grip the four rings together and work the final ring into position. (It's possible - I've done it!)

    And voilà! Congratulations, again, on solving your ring. And don't forget to tie the rings together...


    Note: I haven't been able to find the official name of these rings, which seem to have peaked in popularity in the 1970s, nor whether these rings are ‘Arabic’ in any genuine sense; the four-part type illustrated I'm told is mostly made in India, of unhallmarked silver, i.e. presumably silver plus low melting-point metal or (much more likely) the cheap alloy which is used to imitate silver. The eight-part type is obtainable from jewellers in the UK and is a standard stock item under the name of 'puzzle ring', along with an equivalent slender four- and six-part style, the six parts being made by splitting each X sub-ring into two.
          Checking at a number of jewellers revealed there seem to be no three-part rings, though I thought I'd seen one, and I think it must be possible to make one.
          I've never seen a topological treatment of these in any maths text.


    Top of this page
    www.big-lies.org

    HTML Rae West First uploaded 98-04-08 Revision with 8-part ring 1998-09-15.


    Three Razor Blade Myths

    Three Razor Blade Myths

    © Rae West 1998

    These examples suggest that anything hard to measure - in this case, the sharpness of a razor blade - can have popular myths invented around it.
        What happened in the 1980s and 1990s? One thing I found is ‘AIDS tainted razor blades’ - RW

    SHARPENING THROUGH RESTING (UK 1950s)
    Charles Hill was the ‘Radio Doctor’ known for his portentous voice, and such remarks as “Kissing is a mutual exchange of salivary bacteria.” He later became Secretary of the BMA, the British Medical Association. His valuable advice dispensed on the BBC included a suggestion on preserving razor blades: he said if you rest razor blades over the weekend they'll recover by Monday.

    SHARPENING THROUGH REPACKAGING (US 1960)
    Vance Packard's book The Waste Makers (1960) included a bit of market research on razor blades: if used blades were carefully cleaned and repackaged in the paper envelopes, their users judged them to be new.

    SHARPENING THROUGH PYRAMID POWER (SOUTH AFRICA 1973)
    Lyall Watson's 1973 book ‘Supernature’ has something on the Cheops Pyramid as a Razor Blade Sharpener. (Page 98). I think he must have helped popularise this, rather than invent it. I met someone who actually said that if you put a razor blade under a pyramid, it sharpens!



    Top of this page
    big-lies.org

    HTML Rae West First uploaded 1998-04-26 Revised 1998-08-03 and 2013-01-18.


    'Reverse Speech': The Brain as Pattern Recognition Software

    Just a brief note on 'reverse speech', which, like rods, is an artefact of technology, in this case audio recording. Digital recording is the updated version, better and easier than tape recordings.

    Note that moving images have a similar possibility: no doubt Eadweard Muybridge experimented with his successive images in reverse order.

    Experimenters (or people just having fun) might try the free Audacity program, which will record voices, and has an option to reverse the audio traces. That is, it replaces the recording with the same waveform back to front, and they can be played in the usual way; so far as I know it doesn't play them from the end to the beginning.

    Spoken English is split into phonemes, though of course these vary with context, speaker, and running together of words and phrases. Experimenters could try pure vowels, diphthongs, and consonants, playing them backwards to see what they find. Any that resemble other phonemes could be noted; with luck you may find a single sound which resembles another sound backwards; or syllables which resembles other syllables, backwards; or words which are roughly the reverse of each other.

    The lips, airways, throat, tongue and head shape collectively determine how sounds are formed; it seems likely (I haven't checked) that some generating methods are likely to be more reversible than others; for example labial and breathy sounds, though perhaps not stops and fricatives.

    Considering palindromes (e.g. 'Madam, I'm Adam' and 'Raw & snug was I, e'er I saw guns & war') may suggest useful abbreviations and short-cuts—such as some aural equivalent of '&' to get around the difficult of reversing 'and'.

    This might be a useful exercise for people who've been told about hidden reversed messages, either deliberately inserted or unconscious. It is of course perfectly possible to include reversed messages (and they can be stretched, compressed, etc easily enough with modern software). Maybe these brief notes will help perplexed people understand the physics.

        Top of this page
        big-lies website
        Rae West - Uploaded 2013-04-21 (after listening to a breathless Valley Girl type claiming Paul-MacCartney-is-Faul)


    'Rods': Artefacts of Moving Picture Technology

    Just a brief note on 'rods', promoted in the late 1990s as 'paranormal' objects, generally out-of-focus lines with a regular pattern, found on video images.

    Every observational device produces artefacts: coloured diffraction with lenses, Newton's rings with thin films, an eyelash seen in an eyepiece, stretched-out (or compressed) moving objects with cameras that have focal-plane shutters, and the appearance of double lines in a single membrane with electron microscopy are examples in ascending order of likelihood of a mistake.

    Insect wings come in several designs; 100 to 600 beats per second are common with flies, mosquitoes, and midges; the smaller the faster, generally. A video camera operating at 30 frames per second, each frame taking (say) 1/100 of a second, will record six beats of an insect with 600 beats per second, run together on the same frame. In fact the number of wing-beats per second can be calculated from such videos. Butterflies and moths have much slower wingbeat rates which don't show as 'rods'; probably this is the reason for the uninteresting colouring of 'rods' generally.

    Insects aren't generally well-lit, so good videos of 'rods' usually have a dark background, the camcorder itself happening to be brightly-lit by sunlight or a night security camera. (Or they may be dark against a bright sky). Because of the insect connection, these images are often made at dusk and in country areas. Obviously the camcorder focusing is usually on mid- or far-distant subject-matter, giving the impression of fast speeds.

    rod artefact of video camera     Top of this page
        big-lies website

    HTML Rae West First uploaded 2013-Jan-21 'Rod' image from a Youtube by HSWT2009



    'Ropeworms' 18 May 2016

    This idea has been around for several years; I only became aware of it through a chance Youtube-suggested video, on enemas. The mechanism seems to be (I'm not certain) that clean warm or hot water, introduced anally into the guts, by an enema, precipitates or loosens gut contents (complete with acid, breakdown products, mucus and what have you) to generate artefacts somewhat like tapeworms. It's a similar process to 'diagnosing' 'Morgellon's disease' by a process (staining oral food detritus with red wine) which is misinterpreted.

    What interested me as much as anything else is the inability of medical professionals to explain what these things are, and why they form. I couldn't find well-written statements anywhere online.


    Salt in Diet: Another Demonisation Project!

    Since 2008 'WASH' ('World Action on Salt and Health') campaigned against salt in food; and 'CASH' ('Consensus Action on Salt and Health') seems to be a Britain-only variant. This seems largely driven by Graham MacGregor, Professor of Cardiovascular Medicine at the Wolfson Institute of Preventive Medicine. Neither of the above websites give any evidence relating to the actual biochemical effects of salt; or not that I could find. This is a highly contentious area; please be aware there is no general agreement. Please be aware also that it could be another quasi-scientific fraud. And it could be another Jewish fraud. (Jeremiah Stamler appears to have been a leading self-publicist and promoter of salt, and other diet, errors). Those organisations are trying to implement a 6 gram per day limit on consumption of salt for adults.

    Click here for an article on the need for salt in diet on this site, presenting scientific evidence for the necessity of salt in food, with material on quantities needed.



    Added 2014-03-09


    How dangerous is smoking?

    How Dangerous is Smoking??

    There is a diet link with smoking and lung cancer which is still not appreciated after very many years.

    This is a link to a recording of a talk by David Horrobin, the founder of Efamol, which stands for 'Essential Fatty Acid Molecules'. Horrobin, who unfortunately is now dead, researched into human and animal nutrition, and especially the types of fat in diet and their possible health links. As outlined in the talk, one man who was very influential on Horrobin's thought was Hugh Sinclair, a nutritionist. In the 1940s it was believed that almost everything to be known about nutrition was already known, or soon would be. Sinclair had the distinction of having the longest-ever letter to the Lancet published (in 1956); it was a letter, not an article, because the editor felt it may too 'controversial' to be included as an article. The subject was food processing and its relation to health; Sinclair claimed that hydrogenating fats, which made them saturated with hydrogen and less prone to become rancid, had unappreciated health risks, including increased incidence of lung cancer.

    tobacco pipe smoking
    Horrobin's talk here deals with the question of eczema, which in some cases is (he says) treatable with essential fatty acids, the detailed metabolic pathway of which is known. Among other things, Horrobin states that the lung cancer rate in Japan is far lower than in the USA, which he attributes to a diet high in fatty fish. Horrobin also looks at a paper critical of Ancel Keys, the originator of most popular beliefs on cholesterol, heart disease, and fats.
        Since writing this I note that Ancel Keys' parents were 'Russian Jews'. Keys knew Jeremiah Stamler, another Jew; see Salt in Diet: Another Demonisation Project

    Click for
    Talk by David Horrobin at the Institute of Chemistry in 1995; the material has been known about for decades.

    This suggests it's highly likely that a more oily diet, of the correct type of unsaturated oil, protects against lung cancer and other diseases.

    To be continued...
    Very important note It's been known for years that male mammals need far more EFA than female. There was no known reason for this; probably nobody knows why even now. But EFAs, which ought to be regarded as vitamins, are marketed for women, when in fact men, especially smokers, are much more likely to be deficient in these oils.
        Evening primrose seeds contain large amounts of one member of a metabolic pathway (starflowers were found later to contain even more); Horrobin went into business selling the oil, packaged in capsules to prevent oxidation.
    It's strange that tobacco companies seem to have made no attempt to investigate all this in view of the health dangers associated with smoking!
    Note added March 30 2014: there's a well-suppressed idea that diesel smoke, mostly from trucks, causes lung cancer. This is an aspect of the particulate hypothesis: small, often invisible, particles may penetrate to the lungs; the cleaning mechanisms, usually with gluey material exuded from cells and moved with cilia, not being well adapted to supersmall particles. Dr Kitty Little was one of many who believed this; here's a not-well-recorded informal talk of hers. The case seems to have been left unexamined; as with fluoride in drinking water, the real motive was hidden, and 'public health' propagandists took over.
    HTML Rae West. Uploaded 2013-Jan-21 male deficit added 2013-Jan-27 -- though the material was collected around 1995. Mobile tinkering 2016-10-23



    ‘Shapeshifters’ and ‘Reptilians’
    Just a few banal comments on some youtube videos. The shapeshifter videos I've seen are disappointingly banal. There's no 'shapeshifting' at all. Instead, American TV is filmed (the digital feed is not used), preferably at high speed to include partial frames. This of course adds RGB pixel artefacts, and artefacts caused by poor focus and re-establishing RGB artefacts. And when zoomed in, more artefacts intrude. All that's needed is to watch the recordings of TV for something eye-catching.

    Reptilians are usually videos of eyes, lips, or hands. With suitable processing artefacts, single frames may show oddly-shaped eye pupils, hands shaped like claws, or whatever.

    I wouldn't bother with such low-grade stuff; but possibly some people are worried by it. Maybe this may help them.

    [ To top of this page ]   |   2017-03-14


    New Star Trek theory: James Kirk plot ideas, Voyage etc copied from Captain James Cook?

    Star Trek; New Theory?

    Rae West © 1998, 2000


    This idea struck me (in Jan 1994!) and I don't think I've heard it anywhere else. There's a belief that Captain Cook's voyages as recorded in log-books and journals include a passage in which Australian aborigines could not perceive the ships as they hove into view - they were literally unable to see them. Unfortunately I wasn't able to verify this attractive idea, at least with my Everyman copy: they just seemed cautious, rightly so, in fact, in view of their forthcoming 'holocaust'. (NB: this year, near Lake Victoria in Australia, tens of thousands of skeletons were discovered..) But several parallels with Star Trek (early version) occurred to me as I read:-

        The name: James Kirk sounds like James Cook (it's surprisingly difficult to check Cook's first name is 'James'; he almost always is brusquely called just 'Cook'. Only in an obituary notice in my book is he addressed as 'Captain James Cook'; one imagines he spent his whole life stiffly being called 'Mr Cook'.)

        He was always called 'Captain' (in fact his title was 'Lieutenant Commander')

        Cook in the Endeavour, with a lieutenant, gunner, carpenter, surgeon, and others, voyaged for four or five years, not at all unlike the Enterprise '..a five year mission to explore..'

        The Star Trek vocabulary is oddly past-regarding and nautical in many ways: 'Ship to ship', 'your vessel', Captain Kirk's 'yeoman', 'Admiral', 'hailing frequencies open', 'engines', 'shore-leave', 'tractor beam', the 'ship's bridge'. I seem to remember they even had a ceremony of piping people 'aboard'. The only reason I can think of for using ships as models is that they were the only really big transport machines when science fiction was developing.

        One of the ridiculous features of 'Star Trek' is the way in which hyper-developed technology is supposed not to apply to weapons - there was a similar absurdity in Star Wars, and of course it's probably necessary to the plot, which otherwise would come to a sudden stop. However, it is applicable to the sort of situation Cook was in. (Similarly, H G Wells's War of the Worlds could be considered a possible parable of the impact of modern weaponry on undeveloped countries).

        I found a 'James Scott' listed as one of the ships officers. There are 'Sulu Islands' somewhere in the area.

        The (supposed) missions sound similar. That is, Cook observed the odd eclipse of the sun and transit of Venus, and collected botanical information; but probably the main motives for his voyages were empire-building. (Incidentally, according to Jillian Robertson, despite the many references of Australians to Cook, Cook had no love for nor any special interest in Australia). Similarly, although the Enterprise is supposed to 'explore strange new worlds', in fact virtually no exploration is done - I suppose Trekkies are too dim-witted to notice this.

        There are parallels for pinching ideas for science fiction; Arthur C Clarke based his main series of stories on Gibbon's Decline and Fall..

        It seems possible that the sort of adventures recorded by Cook - icebergs, waterspouts, poisonous fish, scurvy, trading with natives in canoes, real or supposed cannibalism and human sacrifice, ships losing contact, kings of 'great majesty', shootings of the occasional 'native', language differences, volcanic eruptions, dexterity with spears, strange medical practices, everlasting snow, occasional sexual topics - were used to provide the basis for single episodes.

        There's an amusing filmic parallel with Hollywood films involving ships, namely that the really expensive bit is filming people getting on or off the boats. See for example the not very convincing computer graphics in the film Titanic. Similarly, Star Trek cuts down the expense here with its low-budget transporter.


    NEWS!! Aficionados of the absurd will be pleased to see that the British Science Museum is to have an exhibition, apparently 'created by the Oregon Museum of Science and Industry in association with Paramount Pictures.' '.. a range of Star TrekTM related mechandise will be on sale ..'

          Their handout (©Paramount Pictures) repeats the ridiculous lie that 'science and technology in STAR TREK were based on sound scientific principles.' May their exhibition fail!

    Star Trek - The Next Generation. New Theory!

    © Rae West March 30, 2014

    'The Next Generation' was late 1980s and early 1990s; as far as I know the full green screen and 3D computer graphics and character simulation were not yet developed. So the special effects now look unspecial. As regards plots, I suspect some of the outline *may* have been taken from Khazaria, for reasons dear to the hearts of people from that area. The Khazars became partly or wholly converted to Judaism; there were Muslims nearby, and the Byzantine Christian Empire, with its hints of Roman origin. To the north were many tribes, notably the Rus. There were Turks, Huns, and others.

        Without wishing to delve into immense detail, the Varangian Rus sound like the 'Ferengi'; the trader characters must have had real-life approximate equivalents; the Romulans sound a bit like Romans, and the Klingons like brutal Christians of the Jewish mind set. Perhaps the fighters were loosely based on Hollywood films of gladiators? Cardassians might have been suggested by other groups of the early middle ages; I'm not interested enough to compare and contrast. But maybe.

    Top

    Home Page of big-lies.org

    If you have the misfortune to be a 'Trekkie', feel free to email a comment by clicking here

    HTML Rae West First uploaded 1998-04-08 Revd 1998-07-27 Science Museum 2000-10-18



    The Taj Mahal

    Yes, the Taj Mahal has a 'conspiracy theory'.

    The received view is that the building is Muslim, erected as a mausoleum and symbol of love by a Muslim. However, there's a Hindu opinion that, in fact, it was built by Hindus, and appropriated later by invading Muslims. Why not try to check it out?

    Top of this page
    big-lies.org site


    The Psychology of ‘UFOs’.

    © Rae West 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001

    Click for: unedited emails (this page, below)   | Click for Top of this page | Click for Home page of entire big-lies.org site

        At the outset I should say that I accept the conventional view that the distances between stars are so great that space travel by 'aliens', and human beings, over such distances, is virtually impossible. Also that some objects in the sky are unquestionably 'unidentified'—especially if only one person's claim is the entire evidence. Personally, I also accept the view that governments routinely lie—at least about important things—so their claims can't be assumed to be reliable where evidence is missing. So what's going on here? Some notes...
    new jews UFOs This small section added 8th October 2014 There are connections with Jewish media control and lies, and UFOs. After uploading my youtube Edgerton, Germeshausen, and Grier: Official Fakers to the Atomic Energy Commission! (8 Oct 2014; click, below, to watch), and thanks to chance Googling, I realised that Jews had several reasons to promote UFOs:
    1 UFO sensations made it seem that remote galaxy visitors were concerned with the serious threat of 'nukes'! In other words, UFOs could be used to reinforce belief in nuclear weapons and power.
    2 UFO claims made increasing security and secrecy and money seem necessary.
    3 Given Jewish media control, there was money in publishing books and films by Jews. Spielberg for example has a large output of Jewish lies: why would he be concerned with Close Encounters and ET?
    4 Reasoning backwards, Jewish media control is so intense, and censored topics so many, that it may be assumed anything in the Jewish media is there because of some specifically Jewish interest, real or supposed.
    Edgerton, Germeshausen, Grier and nuclear films
    Jews and UFOs reflections in nuclear truth site.
    [NB Googling 'Jews UFOs' found me this First Light Forum but its frantic references to Nazis, scams, UFOs, niggers etc makes it easy to ignore]

        Adamski flying saucer; early 'UFO' No moving parts: when jet engines were invented about the end of the second world war, an air motor with no moving parts—or no visible moving parts—existed for the very first time. Futuristic films made before that war show planes as projections of what then existed—similar, but bigger, and with more and bigger propellers thrashing the air often somewhat like combine harvesters. I'd guess that before the invention of jet aircraft, hardly anyone could have believed in 'flying saucers', because they had no experience of a jet engine. Rockets (I think) were less important, since they were recognised as being difficult to fly inside in a safe routine way—a prejudice, if it is a prejudice, that still exists.
        Adamski flying saucer; early UFO Change from 'fast' to 'manoeuvrable': an article in the Skeptic pointed out that, when flying saucers were first seen [term coined June 1947—followed by the Roswell incident in July 47], all the emphasis was on speed: this seemed at the time the important feature. Later—after planes broke the sound barrier, and rockets became better known—this seemed less spectacular, and more emphasis was put on manoeuvring—they were described as being able to hover, for example, although I think probably this wasn't as important as erratic changes in direction, since helicopters and some planes could hover. This still seems to be true: a satisfactory media flying saucer has to shift fast and erratically.
    hairless chimp or real spaceman?
    Hairless chimp, or genuine spaceman?
        Adamski flying saucer; early UFO Animal experiments: it's not very well known, despite the obvious believability, that monkeys were used as 'pilots' in experimental planes and cockpits: for one thing, they're small, and can be used in reduced-scale models; and there's less fuss if they're killed. Since they tend to be hairy, an obvious thing to do is shave them: this makes medical examination of the results easier. My own guess is that some reports of little spacemen are based on this. A hidden bug might present us with this taped conversation: Journalist: "So what did you see, Mr Redneck?" "Why, I saw a li ol' mayun." "Can you describe him?" "Why, just a lil ol' mayun, kinda hunched an wrinkled?" "Thanks. Er, you've been very helpful." "Say, that makes me feel real good." [Well, I thought it was funny. Polyphthongs suggested by Kingsley Amis.]
        If this seems far-fetched, consider that there was a well-known, presumably true, incident in the Napoleonic wars in which a monkey from a French shipwreck was hanged by seaside villagers who thought it was a French spy.
        UFO Roswell Bomb?Roswell Record 8 July 1947 flying saucer headline. Bomb? If the Roswell object was just bits of a high-flying weather balloon, how could it be so misidentified at the time? Perhaps the emphasis on flying hid the possibility it might have been a bomb—perhaps a mother bomb casing, or experimental flying bomb. The attraction of this idea is that it would give a powerful motive for lying, since local people mightn't be enthusiastic about loose bombs falling around them. (There was considerable fuss when a hydrogen bomb was supposed to have been dropped in Spain, presumably in error, a couple of decades later). The 'Roswell Record' said Maj Gen Nathan F Twining said "Neither the AAF nor any other component of the armed forces had any plane, guided missle [sic] or other aerial device under development which could possibly be mistaken for a saucer or formation of flying disks." So the bomb theory can't be right, can it?
        Ignorance and UFOs Poverty of language: It's an amusing possibility that the now-standardised 'alien' (bald, big eyes etc) might just reflect the linguistic poverty of over-propagandised and under-educated people. All the short words (face, hands, eyes, nose) have their iconic equivalent in the supposed image, but the more difficult ones (pupils, nostrils, earlobes, eyelashes) have no counterpart. 'Bug-eyed' should mean having compound eyes, not just big ones. Questions such as "Did it have an exoskeleton?" or "How were the mandibles hinged?" or "Did it have adaptations for high-pressure surroundings?" are presumably excluded when 'debriefing'.
        Optical illusions and UFOs Lack of appreciation of photography/ videography: most people have little feeling for such things as depth of field and depth of focus, and even of reflection and refraction. There have been photos presented as UFOs which were taken from inside buildings, and show reflections of lights in the windows. There are videos taken in bright daylight, with little insects on the lens (kept relatively sharp by the small aperture) moving in a way suggesting a zig-zagging craft, and others with refracted parts of objects which give erratic visual effects. An interesting case is a report by Patrick Moore (famous in Britain as an astronomer, thanks to the BBC's promotion) who observed strange slowly-moving blurred dots through a telescope. He took a day or so to realise these were pollen grains drifting across the field of view. All this is quite apart from the much greater ease of faking pictures and videos thanks to computer editing.
        Optical illusions and UFOs Lack of appreciation of visual perception and optical illusions: the few visual clues in the sky (especially at night) make judgement of size difficult, as anyone can see by looking up at a clear sky, which appears to be dome-shaped, for some complicated perceptual reason. An odd example of this is quoted somewhere, I think in a book by Hynek, in which someone thought the full moon, low over the horizon, was a UFO: the moon near the horizon does seem exceptionally large. My guess is that the cylindrical flying things seen in Mexico at convenient times exploit this, and are a hoax using some ultra-high-powered centrifugally-stable rotating devices, used, as with Filipino healing, in effect, to extract money from US citizens. (What happens to the objects as they lose power seems never to be recorded).
    Racehorses before photography. (From E Gombrich)
    How horses were believed to gallop, before photography was invented
        Perception and UFO sightings Lack of appreciation of physical phenomena. Things behave in odd ways (see for example the debunking—if we're right—of 'superfluid helium' by Phil Holland and myself).
        Another expert error is the case of 'poly-water', starting in the late 1960s, when it wasn't realised that hot glass is reactive in a way cold glass isn't, and hundreds of papers were written on what turned out to be silica solution in water (something like 'waterglass'). Another example, hardly yet known about, is the assumption that clouds are all made of droplets of water.
        Yet another example is the possibility of rolling waves in Loch Ness caused by wind starting disturbances which are reflected from the very long parallel sides of the loch. Another unexpert example: I recall being assured by a builder that he'd seen concrete burning. It's impossible that people without experience of flying objects could predict their behaviour; and it's very likely that experts will be wrong when faced with new phenomena. I doubt, for example, whether the behaviour of fly-by-wire airplanes, designed to be unstable, could be guessed at by people who'd only seen older machines.
        Alien abduction by UFOs? 'Abductions': Presumably the psychology here is similar to that of people showing 'stigmata': first there has to be a self-dramatizing (or money-making) impulse, and second there has to be a framework which isn't disprovable too easily. There's a Darwinian process by which disprovable aspects are pruned away: so it happens that people show stigmata rather than (say) attempting to walk on water or see through opaque objects—having first worked out some mechanism for causing wounds in the officially approved places. (I recall a TV presentation showing a woman secretly making a cross on the skin of her arm with bleach put on by her fingers). And similarly to show contact with 'aliens' obviously it's impossible to produce actual evidence (photos, objects) and the event has to be invisible: hence 'abductions' seem to be almost the only available methodology for getting into 'UFOs', perhaps assisted by Star Trek with its low-budget way of moving around, avoiding the tricky business of filming landing/take-off sequences with doors or hatches opening/closing.
          The 'medical experimentation' fear seems to be a semi-permanent modern neurosis. Cf. for example the X Files film, which has antiquated material on AIDS despite this having been exposed years ago. However, possibly this just reflects the strength of the medical/pharmaceutical lobbies and the desire to evade other possibilities.
        UFOs/alien abduction Influence of films/ books/ comics: A caption under a reproduced cover of Astounding Stories comic (1935) in John Spencer's UFO Encyclopedia says: 'Those who believe that stories of abduction reported by witnesses must be literally true because there is no cultural image from which to draw the story should consider some of the early science fiction. This illustration, has all the main features of the abductions reported in the 1960s and beyond.' [Picture shows 'bug-eyed' man-like thing with pale female body on an operating table, admittedly in a stone building, while another man-like thing grips the half-dressed hero trying to save the woman.] Another caption states '.. modern day stories.. are remarkably similar to the fairy abduction stories of Celtic myth' although the text only lists 'reality distortion', time lapses, and 'changelings' as similarities.
        God and UFOs What's the impulse behind the belief? Is there a need to believe in superior beings, or a hope that there are such beings who might perhaps save the world? Is it a similar feeling to the belief in 'God', a transfer of parental feeling elsewhere, when parents are found to be sadly lacking in omnipotence? Maybe.
          Even your doctor doesn't have all the answers is supposed to contain pearls of US wisdom. Perhaps UFOs are an unofficial subject, in a world where knowledge is parcelled up between countless experts, or supposed experts. The now-discredited Cyril Burt quoted, somewhere, a schoolboy whose main interest in life was ghost stories. When he was asked why, the boy said "because I know more about them than the school inspector".
        Fear and UFOs Fear: The site http://www.magonia.demon.co.uk/ethbull/mms28.html had Phantom Airship Scares 1909-1918, the title of a book by Nigel Watson and others. Click for the review (it opens in a new window; you must scroll down past other items). Invasion scares, war fears, foreign threats, rumours of terror weapons have played their parts in impairing sense and humanity.
        false witnesses and UFOs Problems with Witnesses: and with their presentation. Typical (but this example was accessible only to UK people) was a 4 November 1999 BBC1 TV programme, Mysteries. This was a New Zealand case, with the unusual feature that a UFO was filmed by a 'genuine film team'. The genuine film in fact showed just a detail-less dot, which the camera operator had had difficulty focussing on; the clip only lasted a few seconds. The cameraman was not interviewed, so it was impossible even to tell whether the camera was pointing up, down, or across. And yet the eye witnesses, or actors playing them (it wasn't clear which), said for example that there was a 'large light' and that it moved up and down 'thousands of feet'.
        Motive for cover up about UFOs Purpose of blurred distinction between 'UFOs' and 'Extra-terrestrials': these things are often blurred together; many people speak of them in the same breath. And there seems to be an official movement to legitimise both (for example, Yahoo!'s site on the subject has at least nine out of ten sites in favour, in a section linking 'extraterrestrial life'—for which there's minimal evidence—with 'UFOs'. Just one example.) But, obviously, it's possible that there may be true UFOs, unidentified flying objects, piloted by people (or unpiloted), with absolutely no 'alien' connection.
        The best explanation I have is that it's a cover for testing experimental aircraft, in slightly the same way that English smugglers used to spread stories that the countryside they operated in was haunted. Thus (e.g.) Concorde and other supersonic planes have engines developed in the 1950s. You might view this as showing how slow progress has been since then—or how large progress under secrecy might be.
        The SR71 'Blackbird' Mach III spyplane, designed after the U2 incident, was designed to be so fast it couldn't be shot down. An observer interviewed on a TV program recently identified a modified refuelling tanker he'd seen, and added behind it was a black triangular craft the like of which he'd never seen. Other technologies presumably must have been tried. What new designs of flying objects may have been developed? And what for?
        (Since writing this I found a remaindered book, Projekt UFO, by W A Harbinson, first published in 1994, which is subtitled The Case for Man-Made Flying Saucers. It appears to be entirely based on other books, which are listed as Sources but appear not to have been very reliably checked. Unusually, Ernst Zündel of the Zundelsite is described and quoted—and misspelt.)

     
    Click for Top of this page
    Click for Home page of entire big-lies.org site
    Comments or ideas on UFOs? Click to e-mail
    Click for other peoples' unedited emails on UFOS, directly below.

    HTML Rae West. First uploaded 98-10-06. Revd 99-02-27, 99-06-18, 99-09-13, 99-09-23, 99-10-30, 99-11-10. Cosmetics 2000-04-12. Magonia link, Harbinson 2000-11-01. Patrick Moore 2001-03-31.


    Unedited UFO emails

    Click for Top of this page
    Click for Home page of entire big-lies.org site
    Return-path: <JAdams7730@aol.com>
    Date: Fri, 17 Sep 1999 13:22:58 EDT

    Very nice work.

    However, next time I suggest that you make your studies of ufos and other-worldly visitors a thorough one. Your arguments are pathetic and weak. A skeptic such as yourself, can do a vast amount of damage in the minds of unsuspecting people who are just now starting to awaken from this spell of ignorance that has dominated man's thoughts for thousands of years.
    You assume that there is not a civilization anywhere in the universe that can travel these so called great distances. But, my narrow minded friend, technology advances in just this galaxy alone are not currently in position to be measured for their age.

    To: JAdams7730@aol.com
    Subject: CASTER. What?
    Date: Fri, 17 Sep 1999 22:58:42

    >However, next time I suggest that you make your
    > studies of ufos and other-worldly visitors a thorough one. Your
    > arguments are pathetic and weak.
        ** Why don't you produce a strong argument then, such as evidence? All that's needed are a few reasonable photos, samples, specimens etc etc.

    > starting to awaken from this spell of ignorance that has dominated man's
    > thoughts for thousands of years.
        ** Why should these stories suddenly start now? If 'aliens' existed, they've had thousands of years to say hello. For that matter, why should they only appear in areas where people watch silly US TV? Why not in big cities? Why not in other parts of the world?

    > in the universe that can travel these so called great distances. But, my
    > narrow minded friend, technology advances in just this galaxy alone are not
    > currently in position to be measured for their age.
        ** I assume the distances are far, because they certainly seem to be - the fastest moving things take millions of years, and of course there's no way of knowing exactly how big the 'universe' is. So your comments, such as they are, appear rather feeble. Why don't you try to develop some feeling for weighing evidence? You might become less narrow-minded.

    Regards
    Rae West

    X-From_: JAdams7730@aol.com Sat Sep 18 19:23:22 1999

    Do not dance with unknown forces. You have no clue as to whom you are conversing with. The e-mail adress is a far cry from my actual designation.

    We use simple, and suttle means to get the point across. There is no possible way for you to win. We have inbedded ourselves in every aspect of your culture, and all of the others around this dark, and severly repressed planet.

    Remember, you are the ones who set up this period of time with it's luxuries, crimes, passive brain-washings, and so-called myths designed to be thrown into the realm of impossibility forever.

    But, the ignorance will not thrive forever. Nothing ever does.

    We were here before your kind, and we will remain after your kind has been destroyed by there own hands.

    Have nice dreams this week fool.

    X-From_: JAdams7730@aol.com Sat Sep 18 19:42:17 1999
    Return-path: <JAdams7730@aol.com>

    Look between the lines for the important spelling.

    I can arrange a moon landing for your brain while you sleep. I work better in my own domain. As I said, have nice dreams this week fool.

    From: JAdams7730@aol.com
    Date: Thu, 21 Oct 1999 18:39:11 EDT
    Subject: Re: moonland
    We play game, no?       Moonland fun!!!!       Know me, you do!!!!

    Delivery-date: Sat, 18 Sep 1999 03:27:57 +0100
    Date: Fri, 17 Sep 1999 22:27:34 EDT
    Subject: ufos

    Dear mind controller,

    You seem to want to under mind many people and you are not good at it.

    What you said about u.f.o.s. is not true, just because there is life out there does not mean you will control it. If some finds out that no one person can control them, then you are in trouble of loosing your.

    jms marrujo.

    Delivery-date: Sun, 19 Sep 1999 20:25:51 +0100
    From: JMSMarrujo@aol.com

    A moon landing is a moon landing, people who had an opportunity to land on the moon. You seem to for get who runs the world. The few people that enjoy total freedom have the freedom to enjoy new things. They are never under mind and they always stay beside you. We live in a world of control the mind, always living in the world appointed to you. Just pretend Mother Earth is a 7-11 we are just a pit stop.   Just pretend that life in space is like the water at sea, try to live with your immagination. Then just pretend you are going through the motions. To live is to live with freedom when teachnology passes immagination, You end up in a world of trouble.

    JMS MARRUJO.

     

    From: DSu2025715@aol.com
    Date: Sat, 18 Sep 1999 20:19:25 EDT
    Subject: Nice Web Site

    UFOs do exist. However, not quite the way people have portrayed them OR the entities they call ETs. Furthermore, UFOs are NOT the remote prolific strange things people have made them out to be. While theologians have long since accepted that Ezekiel was taken into heaven by a UFO, it is not something that they would like to share with its congregation.

    Keep up the good work!

    White Thunder

    From: ONEhotBIKE@aol.com
    Date: Sun, 19 Sep 1999
    Subject: (no subject)

    Believe it or not i spotted around 15 ufo's in Brooklyn New York at incredable heights at 11.15 am sunday morning. My partner and i were watching a migration of Monarch butterflys when we've noticed these small oval shiny reflecting objects glittering in still, then move in formations. This was in broad daylight for approximately ten minutes. Heights were way above clouds and no planes were flying when these objects were present. Some moved at incredable speeds in straight lines so i ruled out balloons or birds. At moments they formed to what it appeared to us to be horoscope like figures so i thought we were watching stars because they glittered, but again stars dont move. Whoever i told this to thinks im nuts and my partner is just excepting this sighting if it is one. I wish i had pictures or video because i believe i will never see that again. The military must have something up there sleeves.

    From: Rrumble
    Date: Thu, 21 Oct 1999 09:29:00 EDT
    Subject: UFO's....naturally
    To: ufos@littleton.prestel.co.uk

    Well, I can't imagine anyone devoting so much energy to debunking something, but for what its worth...

    First..you obviously have never seen one of these objects, or your main theme would be (as those who have seen one) one of wonder as to what you'd seen. I'm 52, have flown in the military during the Viet Nam war, commercially, privately, and in flight test. I own a home, am retired and raising a four year old. I am degreed in science, and I am listed in the who's who of business and finance..a publication which honors only 1500 individuals. I say this only to underline..I'm not your stereotyped "Southern Hick Chewing Straw" which seems to get giggles from "Limeys"...I dated a girl from Newcastle on Tyne for 7 years..I got tired of her putting everyone down.

    Apparently if you speak Cockney everyone looks down on you..so coming here was her way of "moving up in class and being respected..which never would have happened in UK.. You don't need to put a class of people down to prove a point..it only shows a character flaw, and weakens your position.

    That being said..the first problem in viewing UFO's is that we use a "present" state of technology to try to explain them, and also place their ability to travel either through space or interdimensionally in the pigeon hole marked "impossible", simply because we, ourselves cannot do it. So I am going to start right there...

    We presently have the ability to surpass light speed. In fact, music has been sent at a rate of 3.5 times light speed by a French scientist. So right there we have the old Einsteinian theory of the speed of light being an "absolute", is no longer true. We have just not been able to aply it to spaceflight...yet.

    Let's see, we've had flight only since 1903..and in the late 1960's we landed on the moon. Suppose another planet in our Solar system, or another, evolved thousands of years before we did. Let's also presume their planet has different chemical compositions on their world to work with that we do not. They may have evolved differently, use entirely different metals, different propulsion systems, and may have even learned to use gravity. We have discovered there are two types of gravity. Gravity is created in "waves" just like sound, and they can be "amplified" and "lensed" as waves, and could at a later date be used as a propulsive force.

    Of course our limited thought processes say.."we can't do it..so they must not be able to."

    I have seen a number of UFO's..up close and personal..like watching one hovering over a beach in Malibu only a hundred yards away for three minutes, and then watching it depart silently in an instant. This isn't "our" stuff. What I have seen makes our technology pale in comparison. We aren't even close.

    Say what you will...make fun of others who actually have seen something beyoun their ability to describe it..it's out of their frame of reference..and when you do see one you're awestruck.

    We are like Aboriginees trying to grasp the concept of Orbital Dynamics or Lunar Orbital Insertion Parameters...and that's just on our own planet.

    You need to broaden your perspective...and this is WORLD WIDE, friend...not just in the deep South of the USA.

    To: Rrumble

    Thanks for your e-mail. I'm reminded of Nazi Germany, when (it's reputed) people like you believed in astrology, ice theories of the earth, and so on.

    Let me explain why your email is so unimpressive. First of all, you show no awareness of the psychology of perception or of anything to do with the design of flying objects. There seems no more reason to suppose you capable of assessing such objects than a bus driver is of assessing some new vehicle.

    On the subject of southerners etc, you miss the point. Cockneys are (or were) part of a major city and had developed their own outlooks, views etc. In the far areas of the US, people are subject to relentless modern propaganda. This may, or may not, be something new in human experience, but is the point at issue.

    It's true that flight has developed in the last 100 years. It's also true that not everything is known, although you can presumably not expect anyone to be impressed by your popular quasi-science. The key issues, such as why the earth appears to have been untouched for billions of years, or why UFOs should appear only to single observers or people in remote places, aren't addressed by you.

    The final question is whether your testimony is worth anything.

    Regards
    Rae West

    From: DAnde10285@aol.com
    Date: Mon, 25 Oct 1999
    Subject: Vast distances.

    You're devotion to the belief that stars are just to far apart to travel to is the same unintelligent belief the roman catholic church had when they believed the earth was the center of the universe.

    To: DAnde10285@aol.com
    Subject: Re: Vast distances.

    > You're devotion to the belief that stars are just to far apart to
    > travel to is the same unintelligent belief the roman catholic church
    > had when they believed the earth was the center of the universe.

    Then why has there been no evidence of interstellar traffic for the last few billion years? If it's easy or possible to travel, why aren't there bases, shops, trading posts, all over the universe? [NB the official dogma also is that the speed of light is a limit; if so, galaxies a few million light years away would take at least a few million miles in travel time]

    Regards
    Rae West

    Envelope-to: RaeWest@littleton.prestel.co.uk
    Delivery-date: Wed, 27 Oct 1999 20:46:13 +0100From: DAnde10285@aol.com

    I am not saying that it is easy to travel from star system to star system. I am saying that it is possible and that it does not have to take millions of years. As far as having no evidence of star travel; how would we know what evidence to look for? Do you have to see the wind to prove that it is there?
    Perhaps dimensional side stepping is a possibilty. Perhaps advanced civilizations use ships that nullify all the effects of traveling faster than the speed of light on the inside of the craft. Perhaps these ships have the capability to instananeously be somewhere else as they travel through space, meaning they can be a step ahead of the effects of mass versus speed.
    Regards, Dave

    Another way to put it, is how would the ancient Egyptians know how to build a computer.

    From: Raeto West <Rae West>To: DAnde10285@aol.comSubject: Vast distances and other things
    Date: Thu, 28 Oct 1999 09:11:28 +0100

    > I am not saying that it is easy to travel from star system to star
    > system. I am saying that it is possible and that it does not have to
    > take millions of years. As far as having no evidence of star travel;
    > how would we know what evidence to look for? Do you have to see the
    > wind to prove that it is there? Perhaps dimensional side stepping is a
    > possibilty. Perhaps advanced civilizations use ships that nullify all
    > the effects of traveling faster than the speed of light on the inside
    > of the craft. Perhaps these ships have the capability to
    > instananeously be somewhere else as they travel through space, meaning
    > they can be a step ahead of the effects of mass versus speed.
    > Regards, Dave

        ** Yes; maybe these things are possible, or not - it's impossible to be certain. (I mean, if everything were known, presumably it would be possible to state unquestionably whether quick interstellar travel or whatever could be done). But you seem to want to have it both ways. The usual UFO claim is that, now, and particularly in almost unoccupied parts of the US, there are definitely 'ships' controlled by non-earth life. These 'ships' are visible in the usual way and are recognisably 'ships' in some sense - I think it's fair to say that. If you broaden the argument to 'anything is possible' etc why have such a modest claim? I think these people are a bit like followers of the Bhagwan (?) who think that 'flying' means jumping in the air a bit. They haven't realised that if they really could nullify gravity, they'd fly off forever. It's their limited imagination, not mine, or presumably yours. So we're down to the question of evidence, and so far as I've seen in my survey of popular books etc it shows the same sort of fingerprint as e.g. 'satanic abuse', spoonbending, ESP, and church miracles, i.e. careful investigation of any one case demolishes it. What I'm saying in my piece is that there are various psychological mechanisms, all pretty obvious, which investigators ought to be aware of.
    Regards
    Rae.

    From: DAnde10285@aol.com
    Message-ID: <0.14e7bbaf.2549ca3b@aol.com>
    Date: Thu, 28 Oct 1999 11:48:11 EDT
    Subject: Re: Vast distances and other things

    I am not quite sure I understand your position. You say that all ufo sightings are explainable in one way or another. This is the standard skeptic line and I understand that your type are sick and tired of all the claims, photo's and the like., But what I do not understand is your lack of openmindedness on the possibilty that there is evidence all around and we may not be able to recognize it. We need to open other doors of research and investigative processes in regard to this matter. Most science is also closed minded to this approach. I do not understand how we are supposed to produce evidence of E.T. and space travel when we do not have the tools or the experience to do so. I am engaged in this type of new way of thinking. I have worked for the U.S. military on this subject and believe me they are extremely interested in solving the E.T. problem. Regards Dave.

    To: DAnde10285@aol.com
    Subject: Re: Vast distances and other things

    Date: Fri, 29 Oct 1999 11:09:33 +0100

    > I am not quite sure I understand your position. You say that all ufo
    > sightings are explainable in one way or another. This is the standard
    > skeptic line and I understand that your type are sick and tired of all
    > the claims, photo's and the like., But what I do not understand is
    > your lack of openmindedness on the possibilty that there is evidence
    > all around and we may not be able to recognize it. We need to open
    > other doors of research and investigative processes in regard to this
    > matter. Most science is also closed minded to this approach. I do not
    > understand how we are supposed to produce evidence of E.T. and space
    > travel when we do not have the tools or the experience to do so. I am
    > engaged in this type of new way of thinking. I have worked for the
    > U.S. military on this subject and believe me they are extremely
    > interested in solving the E.T. problem. Regards Dave.

    >Another way to put it, is how would the ancient Egyptians know
    >how to build a computer.

        ** I get a bit tired of people accusing others of not being open-minded. I'm completely open-minded about the possibility. It's the complete lack of evidence of any contact of any sort that's relevant.

    For all you know, the earth might be controlled by a giant elephant positioned under the Atlantic. Or half the people in the world might be dinosaurs in disguise. Or sheep might be planning a revolution in the year 2000. Or a can of beans might weep genuine tears of blood. Or the laws of physics might be preparing to change themselves. Or ice might cease to be solid if three magic words are spoken. Or there may be exactly 173 gods, and a big fight is scheduled to break out tomorrow. Or time might begin to work backwards. Any number of hypotheses can be invented, and looking at evidence seems to be the only way to check whether they're likely. If evidence can't be recognised, it's difficult to see how your 'new way of thinking' can have any effect, isn't it?
    Regards
    Rae West

    I'm not sure what your comment on the Egyptians is supposed to prove. So far as I know, nobody has claimed they had CPUs, floppy disks, monitors etc. But perhaps your special method can detect these.

    Delivery-date: Fri, 29 Oct 1999
    DAnde10285@aol.com
    Date: Fri, 29 Oct 1999 11:33:34 EDT
    Subject: Re: Vast distances and other things

    Your answer is very amusing but it really doesn't help much to think that way. I am glad that you have an open mind on the subject. I do not think that you really understand what I'm Trying to say, I propose that the evidence IS there but we do not have the tchnology to discover it. Just like we did not have the technology 50 years ago to find dark matter, just like we did not have the technology 50 years ago to start the S.E.T.I. project. We need new ideas to hunt for evidence. I believe our communication capability compared to advanced cultures is in the smoke signal era and there is no way we are going to be able to talk to any advanced people unless we upgrade our technology in this matter. I do not believe that physics have to change to accomplish this task. I would like to see more web sites dedicated to this possibility. Most people are tired of the same old rhetoric from both sides and a new approach is needed. What input do you have on this changing way of looking at the subject? Regards Dave.
        P.S. I believe the sheep revolt myself.

    Received: from DAnde10285@aol.com
    From: DAnde10285@aol.com
    Date: Mon, 1 Nov 1999 10:58:48 EST
    Subject: Re: Vast distances and other things

    I completely disagree with you. By creating new technologies through aggressive research you can open up new worlds of science, thanks for answering my questions but I think I will move on to other people with more vision than yourself. Goodby.

    From: DRAGONSTONEFARM@aol.com
    Date sent: Thu, 25 Nov 1999 09:01:46 -0000
    As far as the "psychology of believers" goes, what have you to say about the equally interesting stand of skeptics such as Phillip Klass, who have written at great length about such cases as the Travis Walton case (i.e. 6 people cannot pass a lie detector test identically)??

    Are you familiar with this case? As to the lack of physical evidence, isn't Walton himself physical evidence?

    What goes through the mind of a skeptic who puts so much energy into debunking cases?

    What is there to be protected by debunking? Status Quo? What is the agenda? What service do you provide?

    Thanks for your email. If you have any evidence for extra-terrestrials, please let me know it!
    Thanks.
    Rae West.

    From: DERWOLFE@aol.com
    Date sent: Wed, 15 Dec 1999 19:11:51 EST

    IF THERE WAS REALLY A CRASH THAT TOOK PLACE AT ROSWELL, WHERE DO YOU THINK THAT THE SPACE CRAFT, OF THAT SIZE COULD BE HIDDEN ALL THIS TIME. PLEASE REPLY. IT IS HARD TO PICTURE A SPACE SHIP STILL HIDDEN ACCORDING TO SOME PEOPLE.

    THANK YOU
    MICHAEL GROSS

    From: Raeto West, Rae West
    To: DERWOLFE@aol.com

    ** Please reply? OK. My view on UFOs is that (i) in a sense, they exist - there must be experimental planes, satellites, flying objects which people can't identify; (ii) the supposed connection with 'aliens' is almost certainly nonsense, and muddies the water, either deliberately or through sensationalism.

    On Roswell, I suspect the may have been some sort of experimental aircraft, but of course it's hard to know. But I don't think there would be any difficulty in hiding whatever was found. There are plenty of large storage facilities in the US! I don't believe for a minute anything 'alien' was found. But, if it had been, it wouldn't be difficult to hide it, either, would it.

    Regards
    Rae West

    From: MarutKhan@aol.com
    Subject: Re: Not Bad considering.....
    Date sent: Sat, 8 Jan 2000

    But one must take into account the nature of the events prior to 1947.
    It is apparent that this has been going on for quite some time, in the order of many 1000's of years.
    Yet despite what should be clear an incontrovertible proof, we are no closer now than when this whole thing started, and I think that therin lies the answers.

    I think that UFO's are terrestrial, but not human I think that they are intelligently built designed, and operated, but for the express purpose of hiding the nature and origin of the intelligence behiond them.
    I think that all UFO's are fakes, only some of which are done by humans.
    I will be willing to explain if you so desire
    marutkhaniDarkAngel

    To: Marutkhan
    It is apparent that this has been going on for quite some time, in the order of many 1000's of years.
      ** In fact, this is not so; perhaps you can produce some evidence that there have been 'UFOs' for thouands of years?

    I will be willing to explain if you so desire
      ** I'd be perfectly happy to hear your explanation. In fact, I may add it to my email collection.

    From: "stan mcgee"
    Date sent: Fri, 22 Jan 1999

    Your site is really cool I was looking for this kind of site for a while.It  would be perfect if some was in french because i need to translate some  of this.

    If you know a French translator willing to do some of it, let me know!
    Rae West

    From: JLackman@about-inc.com
    Subject: UFOs Resource
    Date sent: Fri, 18 Feb 2000Hello,
    I was browsing the Web and came across your email address and thought you might be interested in checking out About.com's UFOs site (http://ufos.about.com/).

    Here are some highlights:

    - Articles & news updates
    - A guide to UFO terms, places, and events
    - A timeline of major UFO events from 1897 until now
    - A database of sightings, updated regularly
    - Active forums and chat rooms
    - Polls of current beliefs about UFOs and aliens
    - Annotated links to 100s of the best UFO sites
    - An email newsletter

    Perhaps the best thing about the About.com UFOs site is its attention to detail. Your Guide, experienced UFO researcher Loy Lawhon, has meticulously sifted the available information on UFOs to bring you the most revealing resources and the most objective analysis around.

    I'd like to invite you over to take a look at http://ufos.about.com. We welcome your feedback, and if you find our site of use, please pass this note on to your colleagues and consider linking to us from your site. In anycase, thanks for checking us out.

    I should mention that, if you're interested, About.com offers anaffiliate program that will pay you 5 cents for every visitor that clicks through to our site - sign up at http://affiliates.about.com

    Thanks,
    Jon Lackman
    Science Editor, About.com... each site is created by a qualified About.com Guide, a company-certified subject specialist who's responsible for helping you get the most out of your time online.

    From: Tcscousin@aol.com
    Date sent: Thu, 9 Mar 2000
    Subject: nice sceptical talking

    Your type of site is very uncommon, because people are in the pursuit of self fulfillment and money. One example is an english man who video taped the shuttle coming in, he moved around to make the shuttle look like it was moving sideways. There is proof governments test and use secret air craft, and the possibilities of other life are very high. But that has nothing to do with little grays from zeta reticula and all this other fantasy. You can't be arrogant or gullible, or a LIER as many are, or you'll never know forsure. I do believe in God, but because I read the bible, some believe Jesus was an alien and all the bible stories are told right in english, but they don't even read it. Thank you, but don't close your mind, just filter it of all the trash.

    From: SLicKVick1465@aol.com
    Date sent: Sat, 11 Mar 2000

    u suck rip offs

    From: OZZY***@aol.com
    Date sent: Sat, 25 Mar 2000
    Subject: ufo's

    my  name is  ryan Lee

    im 16 years old living  in la,ca
    i have red book after on people's theries on  this "fling disk".
    i  know i will never come to  a conlution but i need more info on this matter. so if  have any info on this  please  send  it to me.
    ryan

    Hello, Ryan.
    Do yourself a favor and try to find some well-written books (not the usual sort of mass-produced junk) and try to teach yourself to read and write English. It will be an investment for you.
    Regards
    Rae West
    yeah!!!!
    that sounds like info ill look into a good book.
    i really think they are real but everyone has thare  belefs on how they fly,how do you think they fly?Or do you know of any kind of perpalltion i dont know of ?
    from: ryan


    Click for Top of this page
    Click for Home page of entire big-lies.org site
    WAS http://www2.prestel.co.uk/littleton Uploaded 99-11-10. Rev 2000-04-12. This standalone version more or less identical first uploaded 29 July 2016

    Unedited UFO emails

    Return-path: <JAdams7730@aol.com>
    Date: Fri, 17 Sep 1999 13:22:58 EDT

    Very nice work.

    However, next time I suggest that you make your studies of ufos and other-worldly visitors a thorough one. Your arguments are pathetic and weak. A skeptic such as yourself, can do a vast amount of damage in the minds of unsuspecting people who are just now starting to awaken from this spell of ignorance that has dominated man's thoughts for thousands of years.
    You assume that there is not a civilization anywhere in the universe that can travel these so called great distances. But, my narrow minded friend, technology advances in just this galaxy alone are not currently in position to be measured for their age.

    To: JAdams7730@aol.com
    Subject: CASTER. What?
    Date: Fri, 17 Sep 1999 22:58:42

    >However, next time I suggest that you make your> studies of ufos and other-worldly visitors a thorough one. Your > arguments are pathetic and weak.
        ** Why don't you produce a strong argument then, such as evidence? All that's needed are a few reasonable photos, samples, specimens etc etc.

    > starting to awaken from this spell of ignorance that has dominated man's
    > thoughts for thousands of years.
        ** Why should these stories suddenly start now? If 'aliens' existed, they've had thousands of years to say hello. For that matter, why should they only appear in areas where people watch silly US TV? Why not in big cities? Why not in other parts of the world?

    > in the universe that can travel these so called great distances. But, my
    > narrow minded friend, technology advances in just this galaxy alone are not
    > currently in position to be measured for their age.
        ** I assume the distances are far, because they certainly seem to be - the fastest moving things take millions of years, and of course there's no way of knowing exactly how big the 'universe' is. So your comments, such as they are, appear rather feeble. Why don't you try to develop some feeling for weighing evidence? You might become less narrow-minded.

    Regards
    Rae West

    X-From_: JAdams7730@aol.com Sat Sep 18 19:23:22 1999

    Do not dance with unknown forces. You have no clue as to whom you are conversing with. The e-mail adress is a far cry from my actual designation.

    We use simple, and suttle means to get the point across. There is no possible way for you to win. We have inbedded ourselves in every aspect of your culture, and all of the others around this dark, and severly repressed planet.

    Remember, you are the ones who set up this period of time with it's luxuries, crimes, passive brain-washings, and so-called myths designed to be thrown into the realm of impossibility forever.

    But, the ignorance will not thrive forever. Nothing ever does.

    We were here before your kind, and we will remain after your kind has been destroyed by there own hands.

    Have nice dreams this week fool.

    X-From_: JAdams7730@aol.com Sat Sep 18 19:42:17 1999
    Return-path: <JAdams7730@aol.com>

    Look between the lines for the important spelling.

    I can arrange a moon landing for your brain while you sleep. I work better in my own domain. As I said, have nice dreams this week fool.

    From: JAdams7730@aol.com
    Date: Thu, 21 Oct 1999 18:39:11 EDT
    Subject: Re: moonland
    We play game, no?       Moonland fun!!!!       Know me, you do!!!!

     

    Delivery-date: Sat, 18 Sep 1999 03:27:57 +0100
    Date: Fri, 17 Sep 1999 22:27:34 EDT
    Subject: ufos

    Dear mind controller,

    You seem to want to under mind many people and you are not good at it.

    What you said about u.f.o.s. is not true, just because there is life out there does not mean you will control it. If some finds out that no one person can control them, then you are in trouble of loosing your.

    jms marrujo.

    Delivery-date: Sun, 19 Sep 1999 20:25:51 +0100
    From: JMSMarrujo@aol.com

    A moon landing is a moon landing, people who had an opportunity to land on the moon. You seem to for get who runs the world. The few people that enjoy total freedom have the freedom to enjoy new things. They are never under mind and they always stay beside you. We live in a world of control the mind, always living in the world appointed to you. Just pretend Mother Earth is a 7-11 we are just a pit stop.   Just pretend that life in space is like the water at sea, try to live with your immagination. Then just pretend you are going through the motions. To live is to live with freedom when teachnology passes immagination, You end up in a world of trouble.

    JMS MARRUJO.

     

    From: DSu2025715@aol.com
    Date: Sat, 18 Sep 1999 20:19:25 EDT
    Subject: Nice Web Site

    UFOs do exist. However, not quite the way people have portrayed them OR the entities they call ETs. Furthermore, UFOs are NOT the remote prolific strange things people have made them out to be. While theologians have long since accepted that Ezekiel was taken into heaven by a UFO, it is not something that they would like to share with its congregation.

    Keep up the good work!

    White Thunder

     

    From: ONEhotBIKE@aol.com
    Date: Sun, 19 Sep 1999
    Subject: (no subject)

    Believe it or not i spotted around 15 ufo's in Brooklyn New York at incredable heights at 11.15 am sunday morning. My partner and i were watching a migration of Monarch butterflys when we've noticed these small oval shiny reflecting objects glittering in still, then move in formations. This was in broad daylight for approximately ten minutes. Heights were way above clouds and no planes were flying when these objects were present. Some moved at incredable speeds in straight lines so i ruled out balloons or birds. At moments they formed to what it appeared to us to be horoscope like figures so i thought we were watching stars because they glittered, but again stars dont move. Whoever i told this to thinks im nuts and my partner is just excepting this sighting if it is one. I wish i had pictures or video because i believe i will never see that again. The military must have something up there sleeves.

     

    From: Rrumble
    Date: Thu, 21 Oct 1999 09:29:00 EDT
    Subject: UFO's....naturally
    To: ufos@littleton.prestel.co.uk

    Well, I can't imagine anyone devoting so much energy to debunking something, but for what its worth...

    First..you obviously have never seen one of these objects, or your main theme would be (as those who have seen one) one of wonder as to what you'd seen. I'm 52, have flown in the military during the Viet Nam war, commercially, privately, and in flight test. I own a home, am retired and raising a four year old. I am degreed in science, and I am listed in the who's who of business and finance..a publication which honors only 1500 individuals. I say this only to underline..I'm not your stereotyped "Southern
    Hick Chewing Straw" which seems to get giggles from "Limeys"...I dated a girl from Newcastle on Tyne for 7 years..I got tired of her putting everyone down.

    Apparently if you speak Cockney everyone looks down on you..so coming here was her way of "moving up in class and being respected..which never would have happened in UK.. You don't need to put a class of people down to prove a point..it only shows a character flaw, and weakens your position.

    That being said..the first problem in viewing UFO's is that we use a "present" state of technology to try to explain them, and also place their ability to travel either through space or interdimensionally in the pigeon hole marked "impossible", simply because we, ourselves cannot do it. So I am going to start right there...

    We presently have the ability to surpass light speed. In fact, music has been sent at a rate of 3.5 times light speed by a French scientist. So right there we have the old Einsteinian theory of the speed of light being an "absolute", is no longer true. We have just not been able to aply it to spaceflight...yet.

    Let's see, we've had flight only since 1903..and in the late 1960's we landed on the moon. Suppose another planet in our Solar system, or another, evolved thousands of years before we did. Let's also presume their planet has different chemical compositions on their world to work with that we do not. They may have evolved differently, use entirely different metals, different propulsion systems, and may have even learned to use gravity. We have discovered there are two types of gravity. Gravity is created in "waves" just like sound, and they can be "amplified" and "lensed" as waves, and could at a later date be used as a propulsive force.

    Of course our limited thought processes say.."we can't do it..so they must not be able to."

    I have seen a number of UFO's..up close and personal..like watching one hovering over a beach in Malibu only a hundred yards away for three minutes, and then watching it depart silently in an instant. This isn't "our" stuff. What I have seen makes our technology pale in comparison. We aren't even close.

    Say what you will...make fun of others who actually have seen something beyoun their ability to describe it..it's out of their frame of reference..and when you do see one you're awestruck.

    We are like Aboriginees trying to grasp the concept of Orbital Dynamics or Lunar Orbital Insertion Parameters...and that's just on our own planet.

    You need to broaden your perspective...and this is WORLD WIDE, friend...not just in the deep South of the USA.

    To: Rrumble

    Thanks for your e-mail. I'm reminded of Nazi Germany, when (it's reputed) people like you believed in astrology, ice theories of the earth, and so on.

    Let me explain why your email is so unimpressive. First of all, you show no awareness of the psychology of perception or of anything to do with the design of flying objects. There seems no more reason to suppose you capable of assessing such objects than a bus driver is of assessing some new vehicle.

    On the subject of southerners etc, you miss the point. Cockneys are (or were) part of a major city and had developed their own outlooks, views etc. In the far areas of the US, people are subject to relentless modern propaganda. This may, or may not, be something new in human experience, but is the point at issue.

    It's true that flight has developed in the last 100 years. It's also true that not everything is known, although you can presumably not expect anyone to be impressed by your popular quasi-science. The key issues, such as why the earth appears to have been untouched for billions of years, or why UFOs should appear only to single observers or people in remote places, aren't addressed by you.

    The final question is whether your testimony is worth anything.

    Regards
    Rae West

     

    From: DAnde10285@aol.com
    Date: Mon, 25 Oct 1999
    Subject: Vast distances.

    You're devotion to the belief that stars are just to far apart to travel to is the same unintelligent belief the roman catholic church had when they believed the earth was the center of the universe.

    To: DAnde10285@aol.com
    Subject: Re: Vast distances.

    > You're devotion to the belief that stars are just to far apart to
    > travel to is the same unintelligent belief the roman catholic church
    > had when they believed the earth was the center of the universe.

    Then why has there been no evidence of interstellar traffic for the last few billion years? If it's easy or possible to travel, why aren't there bases, shops, trading posts, all over the universe? [NB the official dogma also is that the speed of light is a limit; if so, galaxies a few million light years away would take at least a few million miles in travel time]

    Regards
    Rae West

    Envelope-to: RaeWest@littleton.prestel.co.uk
    Delivery-date: Wed, 27 Oct 1999 20:46:13 +0100From: DAnde10285@aol.com

    I am not saying that it is easy to travel from star system to star system. I am saying that it is possible and that it does not have to take millions of years. As far as having no evidence of star travel; how would we know what evidence to look for? Do you have to see the wind to prove that it is there?
    Perhaps dimensional side stepping is a possibilty. Perhaps advanced civilizations use ships that nullify all the effects of traveling faster than the speed of light on the inside of the craft. Perhaps these ships have the capability to instananeously be somewhere else as they travel through space, meaning they can be a step ahead of the effects of mass versus speed.
    Regards, Dave

    Another way to put it, is how would the ancient Egyptians know how to build a computer.

    From: Raeto West <Rae West>To: DAnde10285@aol.comSubject: Vast distances and other things
    Date: Thu, 28 Oct 1999 09:11:28 +0100

    > I am not saying that it is easy to travel from star system to star
    > system. I am saying that it is possible and that it does not have to
    > take millions of years. As far as having no evidence of star travel;
    > how would we know what evidence to look for? Do you have to see the
    > wind to prove that it is there? Perhaps dimensional side stepping is a
    > possibilty. Perhaps advanced civilizations use ships that nullify all
    > the effects of traveling faster than the speed of light on the inside
    > of the craft. Perhaps these ships have the capability to
    > instananeously be somewhere else as they travel through space, meaning
    > they can be a step ahead of the effects of mass versus speed.
    > Regards, Dave

        ** Yes; maybe these things are possible, or not - it's impossible to be certain. (I mean, if everything were known, presumably it would be possible to state unquestionably whether quick interstellar travel or whatever could be done). But you seem to want to have it both ways. The usual UFO claim is that, now, and particularly in almost unoccupied parts of the US, there are definitely 'ships' controlled by non-earth life. These 'ships' are visible in the usual way and are recognisably 'ships' in some sense - I think it's fair to say that. If you broaden the argument to 'anything is possible' etc why have such a modest claim? I think these people are a bit like followers of the Bhagwan (?) who think that 'flying' means jumping in the air a bit. They haven't realised that if they really could nullify gravity, they'd fly off forever. It's their limited imagination, not mine, or presumably yours. So we're down to the question of evidence, and so far as I've seen in my survey of popular books etc it shows the same sort of fingerprint as e.g. 'satanic abuse', spoonbending, ESP, and church miracles, i.e. careful investigation of any one case demolishes it. What I'm saying in my piece is that there are various psychological mechanisms, all pretty obvious, which investigators ought to be aware of.
    Regards
    Rae.

    From: DAnde10285@aol.com
    Message-ID: <0.14e7bbaf.2549ca3b@aol.com>
    Date: Thu, 28 Oct 1999 11:48:11 EDT
    Subject: Re: Vast distances and other things

    I am not quite sure I understand your position. You say that all ufo sightings are explainable in one way or another. This is the standard skeptic line and I understand that your type are sick and tired of all the claims, photo's and the like., But what I do not understand is your lack of openmindedness on the possibilty that there is evidence all around and we may not be able to recognize it. We need to open other doors of research and investigative processes in regard to this matter. Most science is also closed minded to this approach. I do not understand how we are supposed to produce evidence of E.T. and space travel when we do not have the tools or the experience to do so. I am engaged in this type of new way of thinking. I have worked for the U.S. military on this subject and believe me they are extremely interested in solving the E.T. problem. Regards Dave.

    To: DAnde10285@aol.com
    Subject: Re: Vast distances and other things

    Date: Fri, 29 Oct 1999 11:09:33 +0100

    > I am not quite sure I understand your position. You say that all ufo
    > sightings are explainable in one way or another. This is the standard
    > skeptic line and I understand that your type are sick and tired of all
    > the claims, photo's and the like., But what I do not understand is
    > your lack of openmindedness on the possibilty that there is evidence
    > all around and we may not be able to recognize it. We need to open
    > other doors of research and investigative processes in regard to this
    > matter. Most science is also closed minded to this approach. I do not
    > understand how we are supposed to produce evidence of E.T. and space
    > travel when we do not have the tools or the experience to do so. I am
    > engaged in this type of new way of thinking. I have worked for the
    > U.S. military on this subject and believe me they are extremely
    > interested in solving the E.T. problem. Regards Dave.

    >Another way to put it, is how would the ancient Egyptians know
    >how to build a computer.

        ** I get a bit tired of people accusing others of not being open-minded. I'm completely open-minded about the possibility. It's the complete lack of evidence of any contact of any sort that's relevant.
    For all you know, the earth might be controlled by a giant elephant positioned under the Atlantic. Or half the people in the world might be dinosaurs in disguise. Or sheep might be planning a revolution in the year 2000. Or a can of beans might weep genuine tears of blood. Or the laws of physics might be preparing to change themselves. Or ice might cease to be solid if three magic words are spoken. Or there may be exactly 173 gods, and a big fight is scheduled to break out tomorrow. Or time might begin to work backwards. Any number of hypotheses can be invented, and looking at evidence seems to be the only way to check whether they're likely. If evidence can't be recognised, it's difficult to see how your 'new way of thinking' can have any effect, isn't it?
    Regards
    Rae West

    I'm not sure what your comment on the Egyptians is supposed to prove. So far as I know, nobody has claimed they had CPUs, floppy disks, monitors etc. But perhaps your special method can detect these.

    Delivery-date: Fri, 29 Oct 1999
    DAnde10285@aol.com
    Date: Fri, 29 Oct 1999 11:33:34 EDT
    Subject: Re: Vast distances and other things

    Your answer is very amusing but it really doesn't help much to think that way. I am glad that you have an open mind on the subject. I do not think that you really understand what I'm Trying to say, I propose that the evidence IS there but we do not have the tchnology to discover it. Just like we did not have the technology 50 years ago to find dark matter, just like we did not have the technology 50 years ago to start the S.E.T.I. project. We need new ideas to hunt for evidence. I believe our communication capability compared to advanced cultures is in the smoke signal era and there is no way we are going to be able to talk to any advanced people unless we upgrade our technology in this matter. I do not believe that physics have to change to accomplish this task. I would like to see more web sites dedicated to this possibility. Most people are tired of the same old rhetoric from both sides and a new approach is needed. What input do you have on this changing way of looking at the subject? Regards Dave.
        P.S. I believe the sheep revolt myself.

    Received: from DAnde10285@aol.com
    From: DAnde10285@aol.com
    Date: Mon, 1 Nov 1999 10:58:48 EST
    Subject: Re: Vast distances and other things

    I completely disagree with you. By creating new technologies through aggressive research you can open up new worlds of science, thanks for answering my questions but I think I will move on to other people with more vision than yourself. Goodby.

     

    From: DRAGONSTONEFARM@aol.com
    Date sent: Thu, 25 Nov 1999 09:01:46 -0000
    As far as the "psychology of believers" goes, what have you to say about the equally interesting stand of skeptics such as Phillip Klass, who have written at great length about such cases as the Travis Walton case (i.e. 6 people cannot pass a lie detector test identically)??

    Are you familiar with this case? As to the lack of physical evidence, isn't Walton himself physical evidence?

    What goes through the mind of a skeptic who puts so much energy into debunking cases?

    What is there to be protected by debunking? Status Quo? What is the agenda? What service do you provide?

    Thanks for your email. If you have any evidence for extra-terrestrials, please let me know it!
    Thanks.
    Rae West.

     

    From: DERWOLFE@aol.com
    Date sent: Wed, 15 Dec 1999 19:11:51 EST

    IF THERE WAS REALLY A CRASH THAT TOOK PLACE AT ROSWELL, WHERE DO YOU THINK THAT THE SPACE CRAFT, OF THAT SIZE COULD BE HIDDEN ALL THIS TIME. PLEASE REPLY. IT IS HARD TO PICTURE A SPACE SHIP STILL HIDDEN ACCORDING TO SOME PEOPLE.

    THANK YOU
    MICHAEL GROSS

    From: Raeto West, Rae West
    To: DERWOLFE@aol.com

    ** Please reply? OK. My view on UFOs is that (i) in a sense, they exist - there must be experimental planes, satellites, flying objects which people can't identify; (ii) the supposed connection with 'aliens' is almost certainly nonsense, and muddies the water, either deliberately or through sensationalism.

    On Roswell, I suspect the may have been some sort of experimental aircraft, but of course it's hard to know. But I don't think there would be any difficulty in hiding whatever was found. There are plenty of large storage facilities in the US! I don't believe for a minute anything 'alien' was found. But, if it had been, it wouldn't be difficult to hide it, either, would it.

    Regards
    Rae West

     

    From: MarutKhan@aol.com
    Subject: Re: Not Bad considering.....
    Date sent: Sat, 8 Jan 2000

    But one must take into account the nature of the events prior to 1947.
    It is apparent that this has been going on for quite some time, in the order of many 1000's of years.
    Yet despite what should be clear an incontrovertible proof, we are no closer now than when this whole thing started, and I think that therin lies the answers.
    I think that UFO's are terrestrial, but not human I think that they are intelligently built designed, and operated, but for the express purpose of hiding the nature and origin of the intelligence behiond them.
    I think that all UFO's are fakes, only some of which are done by humans.
    I will be willing to explain if you so desire
    marutkhaniDarkAngel

    To: Marutkhan
    It is apparent that this has been going on for quite some time, in the order of many 1000's of years.
      ** In fact, this is not so; perhaps you can produce some evidence that there have been 'UFOs' for thouands of years?

    I will be willing to explain if you so desire
      ** I'd be perfectly happy to hear your explanation. In fact, I may add it to my email collection.

     

    From: "stan mcgee"
    Date sent: Fri, 22 Jan 1999

    Your site is really cool I was looking for this kind of site for a while.It  would be perfect if some was in french because i need to translate some  of this.

    If you know a French translator willing to do some of it, let me know!
    Rae West

     

    From: JLackman@about-inc.com
    Subject: UFOs Resource
    Date sent: Fri, 18 Feb 2000Hello,
    I was browsing the Web and came across your email address and thought you might be interested in checking out About.com's UFOs site (http://ufos.about.com/).

    Here are some highlights:

    - Articles & news updates
    - A guide to UFO terms, places, and events
    - A timeline of major UFO events from 1897 until now
    - A database of sightings, updated regularly
    - Active forums and chat rooms
    - Polls of current beliefs about UFOs and aliens
    - Annotated links to 100s of the best UFO sites
    - An email newsletter

    Perhaps the best thing about the About.com UFOs site is its attention to detail. Your Guide, experienced UFO researcher Loy Lawhon, has meticulously sifted the available information on UFOs to bring you the most revealing resources and the most objective analysis around.

    I'd like to invite you over to take a look at http://ufos.about.com. We welcome your feedback, and if you find our site of use, please pass this note on to your colleagues and consider linking to us from your site. In anycase, thanks for checking us out.

    I should mention that, if you're interested, About.com offers anaffiliate program that will pay you 5 cents for every visitor that clicks through to our site - sign up at http://affiliates.about.com

    Thanks,
    Jon Lackman
    Science Editor, About.com... each site is created by a qualified About.com Guide, a company-certified subject specialist who's responsible for helping you get the most out of your time online.

     

    From: Tcscousin@aol.com
    Date sent: Thu, 9 Mar 2000
    Subject: nice sceptical talking

    Your type of site is very uncommon, because people are in the pursuit of self fulfillment and money. One example is an english man who video taped the shuttle coming in, he moved around to make the shuttle look like it was moving sideways. There is proof governments test and use secret air craft, and the possibilities of other life are very high. But that has nothing to do with little grays from zeta reticula and all this other fantasy. You can't be arrogant or gullible, or a LIER as many are, or you'll never know forsure. I do believe in God, but because I read the bible, some believe Jesus was an alien and all the bible stories are told right in english, but they don't even read it. Thank you, but don't close your mind, just filter it of all the trash.

     

    From: SLicKVick1465@aol.com
    Date sent: Sat, 11 Mar 2000

    u suck rip offs

     

    From: OZZY***@aol.com
    Date sent: Sat, 25 Mar 2000
    Subject: ufo's

    my  name is  ryan Lee

    im 16 years old living  in la,ca
    i have red book after on people's theries on  this "fling disk".
    i  know i will never come to  a conlution but i need more info on this matter. so if  have any info on this  please  send  it to me.
    ryan

    Hello, Ryan.
    Do yourself a favor and try to find some well-written books (not the usual sort of mass-produced junk) and try to teach yourself to read and write English. It will be an investment for you.
    Regards
    Rae West
    yeah!!!!
    that sounds like info ill look into a good book.
    i really think they are real but everyone has thare  belefs on how they fly,how do you think they fly?Or do you know of any kind of perpalltion i dont know of ?
    from: ryan

     

    WAS http://www2.prestel.co.uk/littleton Uploaded 99-11-10. Rev 2000-04-12





    The 'World Tree'

    (Someone must have thought of this; but in case they haven't...)

    The earth must have been known, or strongly believed, to have been more or less spherical for millennia. But the problem of how it was suspended must have been a puzzle, just as with the sun and moon. The flat earth idea may have had tortoises and elephants in some groups. I'd like to suggest the idea of an axle was fairly familiar—for example, from spinning yarn, and from wheels—where these had been invented. So possibly the 'world tree' was an axle round which the earth would spin every 24 hours. This of course begs the question of how the tree was itself supported; but, if we don't go into that, the idea of a damn great tree as an axle has some appeal.

    Top of this page
    big-lies.org site

    24 May 2013




    Y2K. RCW. 1999.
    Y2K
    [The graphic above was taken from a free site]
    ©Rae West 1999
    Top
    big-lies.org
    • Story   The Year 2000 problem has a long pedigree. I once asked a systems analyst whether, once really efficient software was written, programmers wouldn't be unemployed. Wouldn't their programs never go wrong? He replied that there would never be a problem with unemployment, because, as the year 2000 approached, lots of people would be needed to alter programs. Such is the power of the fear of unemployment. I even remember who told me this—someone called Roger Emmens. I wonder where he is now. This little interchange took place in 1975.
    • What computer departments do   Commercial computer departments spend their entire time, in between playing bridge/ doing crosswords/ smoking, trying to solve problems—typically every year brings new accounting or tax standards, new companies to be processed or disposed of, new product-lines to be incorporated, new standards to be applied, new hardware and software to be examined and made to operate. Every new part of a system has to be tested. Date processing is just a tiny part of all this. If the systems more or less work now, there's no reason to suppose they won't continue to more or less work.
    • Chips   in some few cases have a time processing function (notably in personal computers). Most don't—if you want to control a lift or freezer, the absolute time of day is an irrelevance. Any competent hardware manufacture will have anticipated something as obvious as the end of the century in their specifications. (If the hardware is dangerous, the dangers exist anyway, and rational political action would seem sensible.) Old PCs have two-digit years, presumably on the theory that they weren't expected to have a working life into 2000. Whether the advice to use 1972 (or for that matter 1916 or 1944) will prolong their lives seems rather unimportant.
    • Hysteria   The site http://www.borderlands.com/journal/millenni.htm dealt with Y2K Hysteria.
    • Sensationalism   How is the feeling of worry generated? Looking at a website—which I won't identify—we see how this trick might be done. The approach is: (1) Make your comments seem authoritative by producing ponderous self-written CVs. If anybody wants to check what 'Background in embedded systems. Leading role for many years' or 'he worked in computing for twenty years' really means, don't tell them! (2) Repeatedly assert that there may be a danger, without producing any evidence. Is there, for example, a risk that planes might crash, or cash terminals fail? The obvious thing would be to ask the people who design them—but the correct approach is to quote a 'survey' which says, say, 40% of the general public are worried about safety of planes. Or what about nuclear power? Merely quote an article in a newspaper by a journalist, not someone who knows what he's talking about. (3) Intense repetition of this latter technique, with luck, will prevent readers from noting you haven't produced evidence. It's important not to quantify any aspect of the 'threat'. Would disruption be cleared up quickly? Slowly? What's the general record of the computer industry? No such information must be given. (4) If, or rather when, your material starts to look thin, supplement it with other material of the same sort—badly-worded surveys by other people are useful, since you can then divert attention by criticising the survey; make liberal use of such expressions as 'major problem', 'mission critical', 'spectacular misunderstanding'. (5) In your conclusion, after hinting at disruptions unequalled since world wars and the Black Death, add a book list including 'Fixing Year 2000 for Dummies', 'How to Enrol Computer Staff', and a few novels.

    HTML Rae West. Uploaded approx last day of November 1999.
    Top of this page



    At last ... the truth about yoghurt!!


        As with muesli, processed for the average consumer's bland taste, most supermarket ‘yogurt’ is a feeble imitation of the real thing, which swarms with lactobacilli, which presumably were found empirically to compete with other bacteria and fungi, but be harmless to human beings, and therefore a pre-refrigeration preservative. Just as blue cheese has harmless (or beneficial: penicillium notatum) bacteria or fungi.
        Lactobacillus bulgaricus is the uncrowned real king of power yoghurt, but it gives far too strong a taste for many consumers. The commercial versions of yogurt have gone through several metamorphoses—ingredients including starch, gelatine, different bacteria and so on—making it ever more remote from the genuine article. I mention this because I once met a Russian (or east European) at a meeting of microscopists; he looked about 55, but claimed to be 85, and I had no reason to doubt his word. He assured me his longevity was helped by his diet, largely vodka and yoghurt, and that faith in Lactobacillus bulgaricus (or written L. Bulgaricus) is widespread in eastern Europe.
        Campaign for real food!

    Top of this page
    big-lies.org site

    20 October 2013

    big-lies.org



    HTML Rae West. Most of this material was in separate files at the dates recorded. This joint upload of files in one (plus new Rods, Smoking, Taj Mahal) uploaded 2013-Jan-21 as part of big-lies, partly (to be honest) as bait to surfers. Gobekli Tepe added 7 Feb 2013. Fairies, leys, motorcycle inventor, yoghurt late 2013. Salt link (site grabbed CASH and WASH support) 2014-03-09. Lunar waves added 2014-12-01. 'Trivial' as in 'Trivial Pursuit'—players may google this site. Background design is based on William Morris' Honeysuckle, 1876. 'Infinite meanness' quotation from H. G. Wells. The smoking and essential fatty acid material is entirely serious. The 'artefacts' note added 2014-12-01. Lunar wave - look and see. 'Orbs' 2015-10-21. 'Ropeworms' 2016-05-18. Jews as hostile takeover of early Christians first added 2016-08-17. I may have forgotten some thing(s). 'Fun' subdirectory 2015-10-21 might help mobiles. 'Tutankhamun' TV Jew prop 2016-11-09. Twelve Days of Christmas 2017-01-18